Centos7 Samba won't accept password from Windows 10 Pro, Home OK

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  1. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
       #1

    Centos7 Samba won't accept password from Windows 10 Pro, Home OK


    My NAS (a D-Link running Samba under alt-f firmware) is getting old and slow, so I built a new fast server and installed Centos 7 and Samba 4 on it. I can see the server on the network from my Windows 10 professional desktop, but it won't accept my user name / password when I try to connect to it. However, when I try from my wife's desktop running Windows 10 Home, it accepts the exact same credentials my box won't. I can see and connect to my old NAS from both desktops, no problem. Extensive online research has failed to solve the problem. Any suggestions on troubleshooting greatly appreciated.
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  2. lehnerus2000's Avatar
    Posts : 1,809
    W7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), LM 19.2 MATE (64 bit), W10 Home 1703 (64 bit), W10 Pro 1703 (64 bit) VM
       #2

    SMB1 fix


    It might be due to issues caused by the SMB1 fix.

    I had to alter my smb.conf file when I was testing Linux Mint 19, because I couldn't connect to W7.

    I used the info from this article:
    https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/ubuntu-beaver-samba-shares.html

    I'm not sure if it will work with CentOS.
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  3. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,589
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #3

    Hi folks
    Absolutely no problems with CENTOS 7 solid and stable as a rock servers multi-media just fine.

    been using it on a "rescued" HP ProLiant GEN 8 Microserver for a few years now --zero problems


    Showing Network map from W10 X64 Pro running insider build 17746

    Centos7 Samba won't accept password from Windows 10 Pro, Home OK-server.png

    cheers
    jimbo
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  4. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #4

    lehnerus2000 said:
    It might be due to issues caused by the SMB1 fix.

    I had to alter my smb.conf file when I was testing Linux Mint 19, because I couldn't connect to W7.

    I used the info from this article:
    https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/ubuntu-beaver-samba-shares.html

    I'm not sure if it will work with CentOS.
    The article refers to accessing a Windows share from Linux, my problem is the opposite i.e. accessing the Linux share from Windows. Nonetheless, I tried the suggestion in the article, with the following results:

    with client max protocol = NTI in the /etc/samba/smb.conf file, I get the error message on my Windows10 Pro desktop "\\CENTOS is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource.....A device attached to the system is not functioning." However, I'm still able to connect from my wife's Windows10 Home desktop.

    with client max protocol = SMB2, I'm back to my original problem, i.e. I click on the Centos icon in file manager, it asks for a user name and password, but when I enter the same info that gets me in from my wife's desktop, it comes back with the same Windows security box asking me to enter my network credentials, saying the username or password is incorrect.

    with client max protocol = SMB3, I get the same results described above for client max protocol = SMB2

    I had seen a suggestion elsewhere that Windows 10 connectivity problems were solved by adding "max protocol = SMB3" to the smb.conf file (as opposed to client max protocol". With this I got the same result of being able to connect form my wife's computer but not mine. Changing this to NT1 gave me the "Windows cannot access \\CENTOS" error described above from both desktops.

    Currently, I have all max protocol entries in smb.conf commented out. The fact that I can get in from my wife's desktop but not mine seems to suggest that the problem is not so much in the server configuration end as in the security settings on my desktop, but I don't know what to make of the observation that I can get into the samba shares on the NAS but not the server.

    As before, any suggestions welcome.
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  5. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #5

    jimbo45 said:
    Hi folks
    Absolutely no problems with CENTOS 7 solid and stable as a rock servers multi-media just fine.

    been using it on a "rescued" HP ProLiant GEN 8 Microserver for a few years now --zero problems


    Showing Network map from W10 X64 Pro running insider build 17746

    Centos7 Samba won't accept password from Windows 10 Pro, Home OK-server.png

    cheers
    jimbo
    Yeah, I see the same thing. The problem is, when I click on the samba share, it asks me to enter my network credentials, but won't accept the username and password I enter, although it will accept them if I enter them on my wife's desktop.
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  6. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,589
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #6

    Hi there

    on the Linux system :

    try and add your windows user name to the smbpasswd file

    as root : smbpasswd -a username password
    will prompt again to re-enter password

    now try again.

    You probably will need an account also on the Linux system too.

    You probably also need to remove any reference to SMBLEVEL in the samba config file -- and on Windows ensure SMB is enabled at SMB1 (add features to windows)

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer

  7. lehnerus2000's Avatar
    Posts : 1,809
    W7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), LM 19.2 MATE (64 bit), W10 Home 1703 (64 bit), W10 Pro 1703 (64 bit) VM
       #7

    someotherguy3 said:
    The article refers to accessing a Windows share from Linux, my problem is the opposite i.e. accessing the Linux share from Windows.
    My bad.

    My friend's Arch Linux machine won't allow me to connect my W7 PC to it, using its network name (it used to).
    I can still connect using it's IP address.

    someotherguy3 said:
    Currently, I have all max protocol entries in smb.conf commented out. The fact that I can get in from my wife's desktop but not mine seems to suggest that the problem is not so much in the server configuration end as in the security settings on my desktop, but I don't know what to make of the observation that I can get into the samba shares on the NAS but not the server.
    Have you compared the smb.conf files (line by line) from both of those machines?
    Last edited by lehnerus2000; 28 Aug 2018 at 21:07. Reason: Additional
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  8. Posts : 913
    CP/M
       #8

    someotherguy3 said:
    I can see the server on the network from my Windows 10 professional desktop, but it won't accept my user name / password when I try to connect to it. However, when I try from my wife's desktop running Windows 10 Home, it accepts the exact same credentials my box won't.
    Are your Pro stations members of Domain? If yes, try to replace <username> in logon dialog with one of the following:

    .\<username>
    <username>@targetservername
    targetservername\<username>
    targetip\<username>

    Similarly if you use Microsoft account.
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  9. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #9

    muchomurka said:
    Are your Pro stations members of Domain? If yes, try to replace <username> in logon dialog with one of the following:

    .\<username>
    <username>@targetservername
    targetservername\<username>
    targetip\<username>

    Similarly if you use Microsoft account.
    I'm in a workgroup, not a domain. I had been logging on to my computer using a Microsoft account. My wife logs on to hers with a local account. I recently saw someplace a post where someone said that using a Microsoft account ups the security expectations, so I changed mine to a local account. No joy. I tried every combination of user names and passwords I could think of following your advice; again no joy.

    I had previously seen something elsewhere about the setting the Local Security Policy - Network Security :Lan Manager authentication level to "Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 security if negotiated". When I checked I found that was where my setting already was. However today I found a post where someone said they were able to solve a similar problem by changing that setting to something else and then back again. I changed my setting to "Send NTLMv2 response only - Refuse LM & NTLM", and found I was immediately able to see the shared folders on the server; it no longer asked for a user name / password. I changed the setting back, and it still works. I can enter the anonymous folder, but not the one I plan to use, so I still have work to do regarding user name password authentication, but this represents a major step forward.
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  10. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #10

    someotherguy3 said:
    I'm in a workgroup, not a domain. I had been logging on to my computer using a Microsoft account. My wife logs on to hers with a local account. I recently saw someplace a post where someone said that using a Microsoft account ups the security expectations, so I changed mine to a local account. No joy. I tried every combination of user names and passwords I could think of following your advice; again no joy.

    I had previously seen something elsewhere about the setting the Local Security Policy - Network Security :Lan Manager authentication level to "Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 security if negotiated". When I checked I found that was where my setting already was. However today I found a post where someone said they were able to solve a similar problem by changing that setting to something else and then back again. I changed my setting to "Send NTLMv2 response only - Refuse LM & NTLM", and found I was immediately able to see the shared folders on the server; it no longer asked for a user name / password. I changed the setting back, and it still works. I can enter the anonymous folder, but not the one I plan to use, so I still have work to do regarding user name password authentication, but this represents a major step forward.
    Latest info:
    I've had a couple of instances where I can no longer see the server on the network. In the first instance, I restored the connection by going in and changing the network security policy again. This time I left it on the more restrictive setting. The next time it happened I tried re-booting the Windows 10 desktop, which also worked. It's all highly annoying, and I have no idea why it happens, but at least now I have good idea of how to deal with it when it happens.
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