Windows 10: Any easy tool to deploy GPT layout for a fresh install Solved

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  1.    29 Nov 2017 #1

    Any easy tool to deploy GPT layout for a fresh install


    Hello.

    I am still sticking to good ole MBR layout partitioning because it works fine for me (and for my backups) and I admit I do not understand GPT layout that much. I have been reading about it but the concept still escapes me. It seems weird for me and I feel it lacks flexibility. I might be completely wrong though. I ALWAYS use a partition for booting, where the OS and apps reside, and another one where all personal data is stored. This is mandatory for me, because it makes things a lot easier when there is a sudden os change or disaster strikes. It's also a lot more comfortable for making OS backups.

    So. If I wanted to install w10 on a new fresh pc/hd/ssd, is there a graphical easy-to-use util to do the GPT layout for you?

    If so, can you recommend any?

    Thanks.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 13,466
    Windows 10 Pro
       29 Nov 2017 #2
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 2,774
    3-Win-7Prox64 2-Win10Prox64
       29 Nov 2017 #3

    Hi,
    Yeah 10 if installed with a flash drive with it's media creation tool will indeed install and switch a ssd.. to gpt automatically
    10 does this because it loves the ability to create as many 450mb system restore partitions as it needs or has too in the future when large builds are installed.

    Personally I've been using dvd installs so it stays as mbr disk
    Most installs are on small ssd's so there is no need for more than 3 partitions and even that is one too many really

    But one does have to manage and remove the extra 450mb system restore partitions in the future because 3-4 is max on mbr disk sort of why 10 is installing or changing disks to gpt now.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  4. Posts : 2,253
    Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64 Win10Prox64
       29 Nov 2017 #4

    Yeah 10 if installed with a flash drive with it's media creation tool will indeed install and switch a ssd.. to gpt automatically
    This is not true. Here's why people got confused:
    It does not matter if you use USB or DVD to install Windows.
    If you want to install Windows using GPT partition scheme:
    1. Set the BIOS to UEFI. Disable Secure Boot so you won't have trouble with unsigned drivers.
    2. There are 2 modes from the USB/DVD to boot from, select UEFI-USB or UEFI-DVD (USB/DVD usually the name of the Manufactuter)

    If you want to install using MBR scheme:
    1. Set BIOS to LEGACY/MBR/enable CSM (The wording is different from BIOS to BIOS)
    2. Boot up Windows installation without the UEFI prefix.

    Here's an example boot screen:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    10 does this because it loves the ability to create as many 450mb system restore partitions as it needs or has too in the future when large builds are installed.
    Again, this is also not true. If you install Windows with all partitions layout correctly. No extra partition will be created. I updated 3 of my PC's from 1607->1703->1709 and no extra Recovery partitions were created.

    Also if you upgrade from Win7/Win8 where the System reserved or Recovery partition are too small in size then Windows upgrade will create extra Recovery partition.

    Whether you install Windows using MBR or GPT. The best way is to have only the HD/SSD connected, wipe out the disk, leave it unallocated and let Windows creates all necessary partitions.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    29 Nov 2017 #5

    A big thank you to you guys. Lots of juicy nice information here.

    Thanks for the guide, Kari. Ahhh, good ole command-line diskpart...

    But the big question still remains for me. Is there any advantages for using GPT over MBR (I only need 2 partitions - System/Data and on drives which are commonly less that 2.2 TB in size?

    GPT layout seems confusing to say the least. A FAT32 partition, an MSR partition (with the need of a very long unique ID) (what is this for?).
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    29 Nov 2017 #6

    After checking and borrowing Kari's script, one doubt crossed my mind.

    What about the need for aligning partitions for hds with physical cluster greater than 512b (and SSDs). I think one can add an align=2048 switch, right? What about if I want to create two partitions (like the example), but the second one for DATA. Will create partition size=xxxx suffice? And another question (yes, these are a lot of questions). If the main system partition (where OS resides is meant to have a medium size 50-100GB), how about placing the Recovery partition after the second one (to shrink this one that is larger)?. So the layout would be something like this:

    100 MB EFI Partition FAT32 (Can this one be aligned? If so, will the remaining ones be aligned too?)
    16 MB MSR Partition Unformatted
    50-100GB System Partition (primary) NTFS
    Remaining space (minus shrunk 450MB) Data Partition NTFS
    450 MB Recovery (WinRE) Partition.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 13,466
    Windows 10 Pro
       29 Nov 2017 #7

    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    After checking and borrowing Kari's script, one doubt crossed my mind.

    What about the need for aligning partitions for hds with physical cluster greater than 512b (and SSDs). I think one can add an align=2048 switch, right?
    Yes, and make sure you use the same size for allocation units when formatting. See DISKPART reference article at Microsoft TechNet: DiskPart Command-Line Options

    Scroll down to list of Diskpart Syntax and Parameters, find Format and see the example:

    TechNet said:
    Code:
    format [{[FS=<FS>] [REVISION=<X.XX>] | RECOMMENDED}] [LABEL=<"label">] [UNIT=<N>] [QUICK] [COMPRESS] [OVERRIDE] [NOWAIT] [NOERR]
    UNIT=<N>

    Overrides the default allocation unit size. Default settings are strongly recommended for general use. The default allocation unit size for a particular file system is displayed by the FILESYSTEMS command.

    NTFS compression is not supported for allocation unit sizes above 4096.

    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    What about if I want to create two partitions (like the example), but the second one for DATA. Will create partition size=xxxx suffice?
    The tutorial I linked to has two sample scripts in step 2.3. An extract from that step:

    Script One: DISKPART script to partition a HDD / SSD for dual boot, or for separate Windows and Data partitions:
    That script includes all DISKPART commands necessary to create a GPT partition layout which contains a total of 5 partitions, from beginning of the disk EFI, MSR, Windows, WinRE and Data (or second OS).

    Script can easily be modified to contain even more user specified partitions.

    Another way to script partitioning is to use an unattended answer file. See steps 3.10 through 3.18 in following tutorial to see how to configure partitions in answer file for both GPT and MBR disks: Create media for automated unattended install of Windows 10


    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    If the main system partition (where OS resides is meant to have a medium size 50-100GB), how about placing the Recovery partition after the second one (to shrink this one that is larger)?. So the layout would be something like this:
    No. Your partition scheme is invalid.

    For WinRE partition to be possible to expand by shrinking the partition before it if / when necessary, it must be placed directly after Windows system partition (C:). Placing the WinRE partition last after data partitions will only cause a new WinRE partition being created between C: and first data partition when the need arises and system must create a new one when old one cannot expand.

    Kari
    Last edited by Kari; 30 Nov 2017 at 04:41.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    30 Nov 2017 #8

    Thanks. But as far as I know Aligning partitions doesn't have anything to do with cluster size.

    Some info HERE. I still don't know if GPT layout has got the same behaviour as MBR as alignment is concerned. BTW: Point 11 seems to be completely wrong (tread with care).
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  9. Posts : 13,466
    Windows 10 Pro
       30 Nov 2017 #9

    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    Thanks. But as far as I know Aligning partitions doesn't have anything to do with cluster size.
    Only that align and cluster size should be the same. value. My apologies, I forgot one sentence from my reply. It's now edited and reads as follows:

    Kari said: View Post
    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    After checking and borrowing Kari's script, one doubt crossed my mind.

    What about the need for aligning partitions for hds with physical cluster greater than 512b (and SSDs). I think one can add an align=2048 switch, right?
    Yes, and make sure you use the same size for allocation units when formatting. See DISKPART reference article at Microsoft TechNet: DiskPart Command-Line Options
    I have to admit that as I have not aligned disks since days of Windows XP 10+ years ago, I can't remember why cluster size should be the same as align. I just remember that it was "the principle" recommended to me.


    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    Point 11 seems to be completely wrong (tread with care).
    You lost me there, I have not a faintest clue about to what are you referring with Point 11?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    30 Nov 2017 #10

    eLPuSHeR said: View Post
    A big thank you to you guys. Lots of juicy nice information here.

    Thanks for the guide, Kari. Ahhh, good ole command-line diskpart...

    But the big question still remains for me. Is there any advantages for using GPT over MBR (I only need 2 partitions - System/Data and on drives which are commonly less that 2.2 TB in size?

    GPT layout seems confusing to say the least. A FAT32 partition, an MSR partition (with the need of a very long unique ID) (what is this for?).
    If you only use two partitions and OS drive is < 2.2 TB, then the only real need for GPT is Secureboot which helps prevent malware take control of PC.

    Also if you ever decide to deploy image of your PC to new PC, you may find new PC only supports UEFI (vendors are gradually dropping legacy biod support. I believe the MS flagship Surface Pros only support UEFI.

    In the end, UEFI is more flexible and secure.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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