Windows 10: How to have Windows 7 (32 bit) within Windows 10 Home Edition 64 bit? Solved

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  1.    22 Sep 2017 #1

    How to have Windows 7 (32 bit) within Windows 10 Home Edition 64 bit?


    Hi folks, newbie here from Melbourne Australia.

    As per title, I'm using Windows 10 and thoroughly enjoying it. The problem is my printer.

    It's a Canon Lasershot LBP 1120 and I REALLY like it and want to keep using it but it is pretty old and for this particular printer, Canon don't offer a driver for a 64 bit operating system.

    As far as I know, there are two ways I can go. I can put Windows 7 32 bit on a virtual machine or in a space on a partitioned hard drive.

    I've heard that VM 5.1 causes Windows 10 to crash.

    Partitioning the hard drive sounds a bit intimidating but I'll do that if I have to.

    Can anyone offer some advice or point me to appropriate tutes?

    I'm not willing to junk the printer and get a new one.

    Cheers,
    Brad 63
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    22 Sep 2017 #2

    If you post a screenshot of disk management, it would help:
    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of Windows 10 General Tips Tutorials

    The way that I would do it would be to shrink the existing Windows 10 partition by about 50 GB (depends on how much you want to install into the Windows 7 partition). Create a new NTFS formatted partition for Windows 7. Apply the Windows 7 image to the newly created partition using the DISM /APPLY-IMAGE command. Then set up the dual booting using the BCDBOOT command.

    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>dism /apply-image /?
    
    Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
    Version: 10.0.15063.0
    
    
    /Apply-Image /ImageFile:<path_to_image_file> /ApplyDir:<target_directory>
      {/Index:<image_index> | /Name:<image_name>} [/CheckIntegrity] [/Verify]
      [/NoRpFix] [/SWMFile:<pattern>] [/ConfirmTrustedFile] [/WIMBoot] [/Compact] [/EA]
    /Apply-Image /ImageFile:<path_to_image_file> /ApplyDrive:<target_drive>
      [/SFUFile:<pattern>] [/SkipPlatformCheck]
    
      Applies an image to a specified drive.
      Use /CheckIntegrity to stop the operation if WIM file corruption is detected.
      Use /Verify to check for errors and file duplication.
      Use /NoRpFix to disable the reparse point tag fix.
      Use /SWMFile to reference split WIM files (SWMs). <pattern> is the naming
      pattern and location of split files.
      Use /ConfirmTrustedFile to validate the image for Trusted Desktop. See
      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=309482 for more information about
      supported platforms.
      Use /WIMBoot to apply the image with WIMBoot configuration.
      Use /Compact to apply the image in compact mode.
      Use /EA to apply extended attributes.
      Use /SFUFile to reference split FFU files (SFUs). <pattern> is the naming
      pattern and location of split files.
      Use /SkipPlatformCheck if the FFU file being applied is targeted for a
      device other than the machine performing the application. A special FFU
      file is required.
    
        Examples:
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:install.wim /Index:1 /ApplyDir:D:\
    
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:install.swm /SWMFile:install*.swm
            /ApplyDir:D:\ /Index:1
    
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:flash.ffu
            /ApplyDrive:\\.\PhysicalDrive0
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>bcdboot /?
    
    Bcdboot - Bcd boot file creation and repair tool.
    
    The bcdboot.exe command-line tool is used to copy critical boot files to the
    system partition and to create a new system BCD store.
    
    bcdboot <source> [/l <locale>] [/s <volume-letter> [/f <firmware>]] [/v]
                     [/m [{OS Loader ID}]] [/addlast] [/p] [/c]
    
      source     Specifies the location of the windows system root.
    
      /l         Specifies an optional locale parameter to use when
                 initializing the BCD store. The default is US English.
    
      /s         Specifies an optional volume letter parameter to designate
                 the target system partition where boot environment files are
                 copied.  The default is the system partition identified by
                 the firmware.
    
      /v         Enables verbose mode.
    
      /m         If an OS loader GUID is provided, this option merges the
                 given loader object with the system template to produce a
                 bootable entry. Otherwise, only global objects are merged.
    
      /d         Specifies that the existing default windows boot entry
                 should be preserved.
    
      /f         Used with the /s command, specifies the firmware type of the
                 target system partition. Options for <firmware> are 'UEFI',
                 'BIOS', or 'ALL'.
    
      /addlast   Specifies that the windows boot manager firmware entry
                 should be added last. The default behavior is to add it
                 first.
    
      /p         Specifies that the windows boot manager firmware entry
                 position should be preserved. If entry does not exist,
                 new entry will be added in the first position.
    
      /c         Specifies that any existing objects described by the template
                 should not be migrated.
    
    Examples: bcdboot c:\windows /l en-us
              bcdboot c:\windows /s h:
              bcdboot c:\windows /s h: /f UEFI
              bcdboot c:\windows /m {d58d10c6-df53-11dc-878f-00064f4f4e08}
              bcdboot c:\windows /d /addlast
              bcdboot c:\windows /p
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    23 Sep 2017 #3

    Thanks for replying. Here's a screenshot. Sorry it's so small.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Disk Management Screenshot.PNG 
Views:	6 
Size:	39.4 KB 
ID:	154606

    I have a disc of Windows 7 so I'm assuming I could install from that into the new partition?











    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    If you post a screenshot of disk management, it would help:
    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of Windows 10 General Tips Tutorials

    The way that I would do it would be to shrink the existing Windows 10 partition by about 50 GB (depends on how much you want to install into the Windows 7 partition). Create a new NTFS formatted partition for Windows 7. Apply the Windows 7 image to the newly created partition using the DISM /APPLY-IMAGE command. Then set up the dual booting using the BCDBOOT command.

    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>dism /apply-image /?
    
    Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
    Version: 10.0.15063.0
    
    
    /Apply-Image /ImageFile:<path_to_image_file> /ApplyDir:<target_directory>
      {/Index:<image_index> | /Name:<image_name>} [/CheckIntegrity] [/Verify]
      [/NoRpFix] [/SWMFile:<pattern>] [/ConfirmTrustedFile] [/WIMBoot] [/Compact] [/EA]
    /Apply-Image /ImageFile:<path_to_image_file> /ApplyDrive:<target_drive>
      [/SFUFile:<pattern>] [/SkipPlatformCheck]
    
      Applies an image to a specified drive.
      Use /CheckIntegrity to stop the operation if WIM file corruption is detected.
      Use /Verify to check for errors and file duplication.
      Use /NoRpFix to disable the reparse point tag fix.
      Use /SWMFile to reference split WIM files (SWMs). <pattern> is the naming
      pattern and location of split files.
      Use /ConfirmTrustedFile to validate the image for Trusted Desktop. See
      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=309482 for more information about
      supported platforms.
      Use /WIMBoot to apply the image with WIMBoot configuration.
      Use /Compact to apply the image in compact mode.
      Use /EA to apply extended attributes.
      Use /SFUFile to reference split FFU files (SFUs). <pattern> is the naming
      pattern and location of split files.
      Use /SkipPlatformCheck if the FFU file being applied is targeted for a
      device other than the machine performing the application. A special FFU
      file is required.
    
        Examples:
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:install.wim /Index:1 /ApplyDir:D:\
    
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:install.swm /SWMFile:install*.swm
            /ApplyDir:D:\ /Index:1
    
          DISM.exe /Apply-Image /ImageFile:flash.ffu
            /ApplyDrive:\\.\PhysicalDrive0
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>bcdboot /?
    
    Bcdboot - Bcd boot file creation and repair tool.
    
    The bcdboot.exe command-line tool is used to copy critical boot files to the
    system partition and to create a new system BCD store.
    
    bcdboot <source> [/l <locale>] [/s <volume-letter> [/f <firmware>]] [/v]
                     [/m [{OS Loader ID}]] [/addlast] [/p] [/c]
    
      source     Specifies the location of the windows system root.
    
      /l         Specifies an optional locale parameter to use when
                 initializing the BCD store. The default is US English.
    
      /s         Specifies an optional volume letter parameter to designate
                 the target system partition where boot environment files are
                 copied.  The default is the system partition identified by
                 the firmware.
    
      /v         Enables verbose mode.
    
      /m         If an OS loader GUID is provided, this option merges the
                 given loader object with the system template to produce a
                 bootable entry. Otherwise, only global objects are merged.
    
      /d         Specifies that the existing default windows boot entry
                 should be preserved.
    
      /f         Used with the /s command, specifies the firmware type of the
                 target system partition. Options for <firmware> are 'UEFI',
                 'BIOS', or 'ALL'.
    
      /addlast   Specifies that the windows boot manager firmware entry
                 should be added last. The default behavior is to add it
                 first.
    
      /p         Specifies that the windows boot manager firmware entry
                 position should be preserved. If entry does not exist,
                 new entry will be added in the first position.
    
      /c         Specifies that any existing objects described by the template
                 should not be migrated.
    
    Examples: bcdboot c:\windows /l en-us
              bcdboot c:\windows /s h:
              bcdboot c:\windows /s h: /f UEFI
              bcdboot c:\windows /m {d58d10c6-df53-11dc-878f-00064f4f4e08}
              bcdboot c:\windows /d /addlast
              bcdboot c:\windows /p
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    23 Sep 2017 #4

    Another option which I prefer is to install Windows 7 in a virtual hard drive. This is more space efficient, and does not mess around with existing partitions.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    23 Sep 2017 #5

    I would (and I did) install it on second drive. Disconnect first, install W7 in other one, replace first one and use EasyBCD - NeoSmart Technologies to set up dual BOOT.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  6.    23 Sep 2017 #6

    VMs are usually the best way to go with these type of situation. If the system is capable of running VMs smoothly.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  7.    23 Sep 2017 #7

    RoasterMen said: View Post
    VMs are usually the best way to go with these type of situation. If the system is capable of running VMs smoothly.
    Unless you have to deal directly with HW.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  8.    23 Sep 2017 #8

    According to this, there are 64 bit drivers Canon Laser Shot LBP-1120 Driver Download | Driver Build
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  9.    23 Sep 2017 #9

    RoasterMen said: View Post
    VMs are usually the best way to go with these type of situation. If the system is capable of running VMs smoothly.
    Nonsense -Windows 7 quite happily coexists as dual boot with Windows 10, and is a stable and secure OS. You only need to use VMs really for old OSs like XP which are not secure.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    23 Sep 2017 #10

    cereberus said: View Post
    Another option which I prefer is to install Windows 7 in a virtual hard drive. This is more space efficient, and does not mess around with existing partitions.
    That is true, I keep forgetting about virtual drives. :-) I completely agree in this case!
    http://woshub.com/installation-of-wi...ual-hard-disk/
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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