Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
  1.    12 Sep 2017 #11
    Join Date : Mar 2017
    Posts : 5,664
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro Build 15063

    That method will work just fine Kari, I however prefer the one click method as MR does indeed work as designed.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    12 Sep 2017 #12
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 5,841
    Windows10

    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    I am fully prepared to get quite a few objecting opinions from esteemed fellow senior geeks to this but although all major imaging and cloning software can do what you want to accomplish, I wholeheartedly recommend forgetting them.

    The easiest, painless, fast and 100% working solution to clone Windows 10 to another machine is simply to capture the Windows image to an install.wim file, then make an ISO based on it and install it on the new machine. You do not have to think the size of the source and target drive, you do not have to think partition system on them, you just go through an extremely simple process to capture Windows image and install it on a new PC. Windows 10 is extremely good in adapting to different hardware, that will not be an issue.

    See this tutorial: Create Windows 10 ISO image from Existing Installation Windows 10 Installation Upgrade Tutorials

    In above mentioned tutorial's Part Four you'll find instructions on capturing the Windows image, and in Part Five on how to make an ISO image based on that captured image. Everything will be captured, from user profiles to installed software and user data. To make process faster and generated install.wim file smaller, it is recommended (but not obligatory) to first empty all user profile folders by backing up user personal data (docs, pics, music etc.) to another drive, capture install.wim, make an ISO, install on new PC, then restore backed up user data to new PC.

    Use Rufus to create install media from your custom ISO to bypass FAT32 4 GB file size limit using highlighted settings:

    Attachment 151775

    This is my chosen method to clone Windows 10 to another machine, far simpler than restoring images on dissimilar hardware.

    Kari


    OK, I will bite (just for fun not for criticism).

    I do not really agree what you are saying is FAR SIMPLER. It is almost certainly the most robust way without using 3rd party tools,and certainly how one would typically deploy images in a corporate environment.

    For a one off transfer, I would say it is rather complex for average user.

    It is pretty easy to sysprep an install, create an image backup and restore to another pc. Since you taught me the basics, I have done his several times, and never had a problem. In fact Windows 10 is so good, even sysprepping is hardly necessary.

    I just create a Macrium Image backup, load it in ViBoot (need pro) as a vm, sysprep it and save as another image which is the restored to another pc. It is not necessary to use viboot, but if so a second copy of original Macrium Reflect image is a good plan just in case things go wrong.

    There are more than one ways to skin a cat. In the end a user has to choose the method they are most comfortable with.

    C.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    12 Sep 2017 #13
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    A Finnish expat in Germany
    Posts : 12,939
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by KabyBlue View Post
    What about the SID issue that is brought up on some articles in regards to multiple PCs having the same SID on a network?
    That's mostly a myth. As long as the NETBIOS name is different, there will be no issues in a workgroup environment. In domain environment you have to manually change the SID of the clone.


    Quote Originally Posted by KabyBlue View Post
    Also, do you recommend not running sysprep even though some articles online state that it is indeed possible to run sysprep on a Win 10 machine (except on a PC that had an OS version upgrade)?

    Using Sysprep in Windows 10
    I most definitely do not recommend running Sysprep with generalizing switch (required to create new SID) on an existing Windows 10 installation because it always fails due UWP app provisioning.

    I have great respect for Petri IT Knowledgebase site in general and Daniel Petri as writer & tech guru in particular, but that article is simply wrong (it happens even to best of us!): Sysprep with generalizing switch will fail when run in existing Windows 10 installation due app provisioning issues.

    Feel free to try it on any machine with an existing Windows 10 installation giving this command in Command Prompt (CP doesn't have to be elevated):

    %windir%\system32\sysprep\sysprep.exe /generalize /oobe

    This is what you will get:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.png 
Views:	24 
Size:	65.3 KB 
ID:	152935

    Checking the log, you'll find this error (UWP app package mentioned as cause might be different, but the error is always the same):

    Error SYSPRP Package Microsoft.OneConnect_3.1706.1672.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe was installed for a user, but not provisioned for all users. This package will not function properly in the sysprep image.

    Generalizing should only be used, is only meant to be used in clean install in Audit Mode: install Windows 10 on reference machine, boot to Audit Mode from OOBE region selection screen with CTRL + SHIFT + F3 before any user profiles have been created and no apps have been provisioned, customize Windows as you prefer and generalize with Sysprep.


    Quote Originally Posted by KabyBlue View Post
    I am familiar with Rufus. It's the best app IMO for the creation process of bootable ISO. They only concern I have is if I have to create the USB using an MBR partition, I would not be able to install a GPT based UEFI Windows 10. Could I convert the partition to UEFI GPT at a later time?
    I guess you either misunderstood my previous reply, or didn't read it through. Choosing the options I told, Rufus will create a USB install media that can be used to boot any UEFI computer to install Windows 10 using GPT partitioning. No MBR <> GPT conversions needed.


    Quote Originally Posted by cereberus View Post
    I do not really agree what you are saying is FAR SIMPLER. It is almost certainly the most robust way without using 3rd party tools,and certainly how one would typically deploy images in a corporate environment.
    Quote Originally Posted by Josey Wales View Post
    That method will work just fine Kari, I however prefer the one click method as MR does indeed work as designed.
    No comments, apart from that I would need to be extremely drunk or otherwise completely lost my mind to even consider using a third party app to image / clone any Windows installation to be transferred to dissimilar hardware, when capturing Windows image with DISM, creating an ISO and clean installing (with existing software, user profiles & settings) is so much easier and simpler and most importantly, will never fail.

    I use Macrium Reflect to image my machines to be able to restore them if / when something happens. I just would never use it to clone my Windows installation to dissimilar hardware.

    Kari
    Last edited by Kari; 12 Sep 2017 at 10:25. Reason: Typos
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    12 Sep 2017 #14
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 5,841
    Windows10

    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    No comments, apart from that I would need to be extremely drunk or otherwise completely lost my mind to even consider using a third party app to image / clone any Windows installation to be transferred to dissimilar hardware, when capturing Windows image with DISM, creating an ISO and clean installing (with existing software, user profiles & settings) is so much easier and simpler and most importantly, will never fail.

    Kari
    Are they mutually exclusive?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    12 Sep 2017 #15
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    A Finnish expat in Germany
    Posts : 12,939
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by cereberus View Post
    Are they mutually exclusive?
    Occasionally.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    12 Sep 2017 #16
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 20
    Windows 10

    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    No comments, apart from that I would need to be extremely drunk or otherwise completely lost my mind to even consider using a third party app to image / clone any Windows installation to be transferred to dissimilar hardware, when capturing Windows image with DISM, creating an ISO and clean installing (with existing software, user profiles & settings) is so much easier and simpler and most importantly, will never fail.
    I use Macrium Reflect to image my machines to be able to restore them if / when something happens. I just would never use it to clone my Windows installation to dissimilar hardware.
    Kari
    @Kari... was reading through Part 4 & 5 of your Create Windows 10 ISO image from Existing Installation and had a few questions as it pertains to this thread.

    I think I understand Part 4.1 - 4.5 steps of the guide (the Install.wim creation process in WinPE). But could you pls clarify why we need the Windows Insider Preview ADK after replacing the Install.wim we created w/ the default one located in the sources folder as you showed in step 5.2?

    Specifically, why do we need Windows Insider Preview ADK + oscdimg.exe (Part 5.4 + 5.5) for? Why can't we stop @ Part 5.3 after replacing the Install.wim in our bootable USB? Just want to understand their purpose that's all...

    Thnx in advance...
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    13 Sep 2017 #17
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    A Finnish expat in Germany
    Posts : 12,939
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by KabyBlue View Post
    Specifically, why do we need Windows Insider Preview ADK + oscdimg.exe (Part 5.4 + 5.5) for? Why can't we stop @ Part 5.3 after replacing the Install.wim in our bootable USB? Just want to understand their purpose that's all...
    That tutorial is about creating a custom ISO which can then be burned to a DVD or USB. If you already have the USB install media for the same Windows version than your custom install.wim, you naturally do not have to make an additional ISO if you do not need it.

    This from an earlier post of mine:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    When you capture Windows image to a custom install.wim file and then create an ISO based on it, or for instance simply replace original install.wim with your custom one on an already existing USB install media for same Windows version, it's a totally normal Windows 10 install media apart the fact that it already contains software and user profiles.
    Two alternatives, choose the one that suits you better: Create new ISO -- OR -- replace install.wim on USB.

    Regarding the topic of this thread, you only need Part Four of that tutorial, capture the Windows image. That's it.

    Kari
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    13 Sep 2017 #18
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 20
    Windows 10

    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    This from an earlier post of mine:
    Two alternatives, choose the one that suits you better: Create new ISO -- OR -- replace install.wim on USB.
    Regarding the topic of this thread, you only need Part Four of that tutorial, capture the Windows image. That's it.
    Kari
    Thnx for the clarification.

    So hypothetically, if I did want to create an ISO, I could use a 3rd-party app -- such as CDBurnerXP -- to create an ISO based off the ISO_folder you created OR I would use Windows Insider Preview ADK + oscdimg.exe to do it via Windows correct?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    13 Sep 2017 #19
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    A Finnish expat in Germany
    Posts : 12,939
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by KabyBlue View Post
    So hypothetically, if I did want to create an ISO, I could use a 3rd-party app -- such as CDBurnerXP -- to create an ISO based off the ISO_folder you created OR I would use Windows Insider Preview ADK + oscdimg.exe to do it via Windows correct?
    It is of course totally up to you to choose what tools to use.

    Personally I see no reason to use various third party tools for something native Windows tools or additional free original Microsoft tools do perfectly well. I prefer writing ISO images with original Microsoft tool oscdimg.exe, sucessor of imagex.exe used in earlier versions of Windows.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


Similar Threads
Thread Forum
Customization Move Location of Desktop Folder in Windows 10
How to Move Your Desktop Folder Location in Windows 10 The desktop is the main screen area that you see after you turn on your PC and sign in to Windows. Like the top of an actual desk, it serves as a surface for your work. When you open apps or...
Tutorials
what the best way to move SSD from broken Laptop to a new one
Scenario: I am business traveling, and my laptop died (SSD is OK, I think). My possible resources are very poor (Greek island). So I don't see a chance for mirroring, etc. HDs here. So I have to buy a new laptop - windows 10 pre installed. I...
Backup and Restore
Move Files From Windows 7 Desktop to Windows 10 Desktop Computers
My Windows 7 desktop computer powers itself off almost every day. So I bought a Windows 10 desktop and set it up. Now I want to move all my data folders and files to it. I will do fresh installs of my programs as I need them. I copied most of...
Software and Apps
Windows 10 desktop 'stop' icon and cannot move icons
Hello all, I'm glad there is a community here that deals with Windows 10 and may be able to offer insight into my multiple issues that I am having, of which the first was this can't move icons issue. I do apologize for the multiple issues below...
General Support
Solved Move Windows from One Virtual Desktop to Another
This seems to be a tedious process of going to the task view, then finding the window and right clicking and sending it to another desktop. Is there something simpler? I was expecting a right click on the taskbar would give this option, but it...
General Support
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:13.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums