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  1.    12 Jun 2017 #1
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 13
    Windows 10

    Dual Boot, what partitions can I remove?


    I want to install Linux along side of Windows 10. This was a Forced Upgrade from windows 7, and I am somewhat clueless as to exactly what happens when windows 10 comes through like this? I don't know which partitions are left over from 7 and which ones are windows 10.

    1. I can only assume the one labeled as 450MB Healthy (Recovery Partition) is from windows 7.

    2. along with the FACTORY_IMAGE D: is also from windows 7.

    3. It appears that there is only three Primary's, so maybe I can just install along side just the way it is? Or, maybe I can remove those Recovery Partitions and then install Linux in Dual Boot. The Dual Boot part I can handle, it's just trying to figure out if I am indeed seeing only Three Primary's. I will leave the only output I could muster up, if you need a screenshot just say the word. Or a better Command to get the job done, to show all Primary's.


    DISKPART> list partition


    Partition ### Type Size Offset
    ------------- ---------------- ------- -------
    Partition 1 Primary 100 MB 1024 KB
    Partition 2 Primary 583 GB 101 MB
    Partition 3 Recovery 450 MB 583 GB
    Partition 4 Primary 11 GB 584 GB

    DISKPART> list volume


    Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
    ---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
    Volume 0 E DVD-ROM 0 B No Media
    Volume 1 SYSTEM NTFS Partition 100 MB Healthy System
    Volume 2 C HP NTFS Partition 583 GB Healthy Boot
    Volume 3 D FACTORY_IMA NTFS Partition 11 GB Healthy
    Volume 4 NTFS Partition 450 MB Healthy Hidden
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    12 Jun 2017 #2
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,335
    Windows 10 Pro

    Partition 1 is the System Reserved Partition that contains the Windows boot loader files (legacy BIOS).
    Partition 2 is the C: drive Windows OS partition
    Partition 3 is the Windows 10 Recovery Environment (the menu that appears if you hold down Shift and click on Restart).
    Partition 4 is the factory recovery partition from Windows 7, which is more than likely unusable now that the OS has been upgraded to Windows 10.

    You can delete Partitions 3 and 4. Deleting partition 3 means that to get to the recovery environment menu you would have to boot from a Windows 10 installation USB flash drive or DVD.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    12 Jun 2017 #3
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 13
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter

    @NavyLCDR, Well that is very interesting, I'll need to think about this and ask questions tomorrow.

    I wonder if marking Windows 7 Recovery Partition as Active and Re-Booting would allow to recover it to a usable OS, or if that is any help to me LOL?

    I'll probably delete those partitions and install Linux in dual boot for now. Or maybe even leave them, what do you think?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    12 Jun 2017 #4
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,335
    Windows 10 Pro

    The factory recovery partitions are rarely bootable, you can always try. If I wanted to use the space, I would delete them both. And make sure to have a bootable USB flash drive or DVD with recovery capability.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    13 Jun 2017 #5
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 13
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    The factory recovery partitions are rarely bootable, you can always try. If I wanted to use the space, I would delete them both. And make sure to have a bootable USB flash drive or DVD with recovery capability.
    I'll go ahead and do that!
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    13 Jun 2017 #6
    Join Date : Jun 2017
    Posts : 5
    Win10 1703

    NavyLCDR

    Hello,

    Wouldn't it be just as easy to shrink the primary to create a new RAW partition space where he could install his new OS?

    I just did 5 dual boot systems with dual SSD's, one Win7 the other Win10. Learned long ago fresh installs are the only way to go when putzing with these beasts to get them running stable. I just use F8 at boot up to select what I want to boot from or change the primary boot disk in BIOS to autoboot to the OS I am dealing with on an extended basis. After the fact when installing the OCZ SSD utility for a few of the SSD's did I learn about over-provisioning. Essentially leaving RAW space for future use when the chips start wearing out so you have fresh unused chips to put back online. Two for the price of one! So on the boxes that didn't have this utility I was forced to use volume shrinking to achieve the same goal and it all works fine.

    Just a thought.
    Cheers!
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    13 Jun 2017 #7
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,335
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by PreyMantas View Post
    NavyLCDRHello,

    Wouldn't it be just as easy to shrink the primary to create a new RAW partition space where he could install his new OS?
    No. Delete the factory recovery partition and the OP gets an instant 11 GB of free space without affecting the Windows partition at all. In addition, this is a computer booting in legacy BIOS mode with an MBR partitioned drive which has a limit of 4 primary partitions. Only shrinking the OS partition would still leave the drive with the maximum number of partitions on it and one or more of the existing primary partitions would have to be converted to an extended partition with logical drives.

    Deleting the next to useless Windows Recovery Environment partition and he instantly gains another 1/2 GB and reduces the number of primary partitions to 2 existing out of 4 maximum.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    14 Jun 2017 #8
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 5,854
    Windows10

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Partition 1 is the System Reserved Partition that contains the Windows boot loader files (legacy BIOS).
    Partition 2 is the C: drive Windows OS partition
    Partition 3 is the Windows 10 Recovery Environment (the menu that appears if you hold down Shift and click on Restart).
    Partition 4 is the factory recovery partition from Windows 7, which is more than likely unusable now that the OS has been upgraded to Windows 10.

    You can delete Partitions 3 and 4. Deleting partition 3 means that to get to the recovery environment menu you would have to boot from a Windows 10 installation USB flash drive or DVD.
    Re. vols 3 and 4, I think 3 is win 7 old partition, and 4 is Win 10.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    14 Jun 2017 #9
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,335
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by cereberus View Post
    Re. vols 3 and 4, I think 3 is win 7 old partition, and 4 is Win 10.
    Windows 7 Recovery will not fit in 450 MB
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    14 Jun 2017 #10
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 5,854
    Windows10

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Windows 7 Recovery will not fit in 450 MB
    Read first post again. Partition 3 is the large one, and partition 4 is smaller one. I think you have got them back to front.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
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