Windows 10: Switch Operating Systems In Dual-Boot System

  1.    15 Mar 2017 #1

    Switch Operating Systems In Dual-Boot System


    Dual-boot system
    Partition C:\ = Windows 10 Pro
    Partition E:\ = Windows 7 Pro
    Would it be possible to switch the OSs? I have applications to clone one partition to another but my concern are the already installed apps being functional. Did a Google search and all I found were changing drive letters only (Diskpart or Partition apps).

    The goal would be:
    Dual-boot system
    Partition C:\ = Windows 7 Pro
    Partition E:\ = Windows 10 Pro

    Thanks
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 2,001
    Windows 7 Pro x64 Windows 10 Pro x64
       15 Mar 2017 #2

    What do you mean switch them ? Why do you have to switch them ?

    You just set one as your default OS and use the other whenever you want to.

    The OS you boot into will always be C, there`s no need to do anything, leave it alone.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GC.gif  
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  3.    15 Mar 2017 #3

    AddRAM said: View Post
    What do you mean switch them ? Why do you have to switch them ?
    You just set one as your default OS and use the other whenever you want to.
    The OS you boot into will always be C, there`s no need to do anything, leave it alone.
    I need to. I have an important app that would not work on Windows 10, but from XP through 7 and
    has to be on drive "C".
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    15 Mar 2017 #4

    caxtin said: View Post
    I need to. I have an important app that would not work on Windows 10, but from XP through 7 and
    has to be on drive "C".
    When you boot to Windows 7, the OS will be on C:
    when you boot to Windows 10, the OS will be on C:, that's just the way it works.
    as AddRAM said, leave them alone or you may not be able to boot to anything.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    15 Mar 2017 #5

    You know. I have always felt so. I have been using EasyBCD the last time I did dual-boot. Need to go back to EasyBCD again. I would swear I had used a dual-boot app that does what you and AddRam mentioned (always set the current running OS to "C".

    I need to revisit the EasyBCD and the other dual-boot app web site and find out what I may have been doing wrong with respect to settings. Will report back to you when I find out.

    I appreciate your insistences though.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    15 Mar 2017 #6

    The bootloader has absolutely nothing to do with it. Drive letters are assigned by the Operating System itself when it loads. The boot menu runs off of the partition GUIDs, not drive letters.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    16 Mar 2017 #7

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    The bootloader has absolutely nothing to do with it. Drive letters are assigned by the Operating System itself when it loads. The boot menu runs off of the partition GUIDs, not drive letters.
    Mmmm, interesting to know. Thanks!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    16 Mar 2017 #8

    caxtin said: View Post
    You know. I have always felt so. I have been using EasyBCD the last time I did dual-boot. Need to go back to EasyBCD again. I would swear I had used a dual-boot app that does what you and AddRam mentioned (always set the current running OS to "C".

    I need to revisit the EasyBCD and the other dual-boot app web site and find out what I may have been doing wrong with respect to settings. Will report back to you when I find out.

    I appreciate your insistences though.
    On windows 10, install Macrium Reflect Free, and from Other tasks, create a boot entry for Macrium.

    Boot pc and select Macrium option.

    Then select Restore tab, and click 'fix windows boot problems'

    It will now list both Windows 10 and Windows 7.

    Click next, finish, and it will create a nice boot menu so you can choose which to run.

    Whichever you select will be the C drive.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    16 Mar 2017 #9

    Wouldn't it be easier to just open a Command Prompt (Admin) and run:

    bcdboot E:\Windows /addlast

    E:\ would be changed to the drive letter of the second Windows installation that is desired to be added.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    16 Mar 2017 #10

    When you run EasyBCD and look at the boot menu, you will see the drive letters as viewed from the OS within which you are running the app.

    So, if you are running it in Win10, Win10 will show as C: and Win7 will show as something else -- let's say E: for the sake of discussion.

    But this is only so EasyBCD can make any changes to the BCD.

    When you then reboot into Win7, as mentioned, you will see that IT is now C:, not E:
      My ComputerSystem Spec


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