Windows 10: Clean Installation - Recovery Partition Position Solved

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  1.    04 May 2016 #21

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    The big mistake, in my humble opinion, was creating a partition after you deleted all the partitions on the hard drive during the installation process. In my humble opinion, just install Windows to the un-allocated space and let Windows decide where it wants to setup the partitions.
    I am sorry if I did not make myself clear enough.

    As a matter of fact I did NOT want to create any specific partition layout during the Clean Installation. On the contrary, after having erased the whole mess of pre-installed partitions, I just did exactly what you are suggesting , i.e. I let Windows Setup to decide what to create and where. It may be worth to add that I had no choice anyway because, when I selected "New" just to create a single Windows partition in the single Unallocated Space resulting from the previous deletion, Windows Setup automatically re-created a whole brand new layout of partitions (Recovery, System, MSR and Windows). In other words, either one clicks on "Next" or creates a single partition in the Unallocated Space, he or she will get exactly the same result.

    Sorry again.
    Last edited by Lmbrt; 16 May 2016 at 13:14.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    04 May 2016 #22

    Thank you all for your replies to the OP.

    I feel really grateful for your throwing some light on a rather obscure issue, at least for myself.

    To sum it all up, providing I understood well, it seems to me that there is a general agreement about the opportunity of letting Windows 10 Setup to decide what to create and where during a Clean Installation, partitioning-wise of course. The only exception I could detect seems to be the chance of "using some encryption IIRC" (fdegrove).

    I honestly had that feeling, basically because Windows Setup left me no choice, but having stumbled in the very interesting article UEFI/GPT-based hard drive partitions I got full of doubts. Bear with me for looking for confirmation, but as I said I am a newbie.

    I would just point out that the initial aim was in no way assessing the opportunity of irremediably loosing the chance of reverting an OEM machine to the original (generally uselessly chaotic, IMHO) factory setup and, in fact, I clearly stated that "one must first create an external recovery drive because after having deleted the recovery partition(s) this will no longer be possible".

    Nonetheless, I will confess that the idea of Clean Installations seems very appealing to me in the first place and this above all for machines originally shipped with Windows 8, to which I do not see why on earth someone would revert after having upgraded to Windows 10, and/or for those ones with relatively small drives, like my Lenovo Yoga 2 equipped with a 128 GB (not that much, uh?) SSD Drive.

    An interesting caveat to all this, well highlighted by some of you, would concern hybrid machines with a consequent issue with touch screens and on-screen keyboards. I just wonder whether the drivers needed for these devices are included in a custom WinRE, as usual in first position, or, more simply, in the OEM partition that finds its place between the System and MSR ones in the original layout... big question mark

    Click image for larger version. 

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    (Image refers to the original partition layout of a Lenovo Yoga 2 13)
    Last edited by Lmbrt; 04 May 2016 at 06:04.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    04 May 2016 #23

    Lmbrt said: View Post
    An interesting caveat to all this, well highlighted by some of you, would concern hybrid machines with a consequent issue with touch screens and on-screen keyboards. I just wonder whether the drivers needed for these devices are included in a custom WinRE, as usual in first position, or, more simply, in the OEM partition that finds its place between the System and MSR ones in the original layout... big question mark
    On an external media such as USB flash drive or USB hard drive, create a folder called E:\DriversW8. Use whatever drive letter the external is, I used E:\ as example. In Windows 8, from an elevated ("run as administrator") command prompt run:
    dism /online /export-driver /destination:E:\DriversW8.

    Now you will know exactly where all the drivers are that Windows did not come with natively. They will all be in E:\DriversW8.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    09 May 2016 #24

    fdegrove said: View Post
    [...]
    For those who just want to know what drives their system has installed:
    Admin prompt:
    pnputil -e > %userprofile%/Desktop/Drivers.txt
    This puts a simple list in basic text form on the desktop of the user.

    Another way to export drivers:
    Admin prompt:
    Dism /online /export-driver /destination:\Drivers
    Replace D:\ with the drive letter of your choice and create the destination directory beforehand on there.
    [...]
    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    On an external media such as USB flash drive or USB hard drive, create a folder called E:\DriversW8. Use whatever drive letter the external is, I used E:\ as example. In Windows 8, from an elevated ("run as administrator") command prompt run:
    dism /online /export-driver /destination:E:\DriversW8.

    Now you will know exactly where all the drivers are that Windows did not come with natively. They will all be in E:\DriversW8.
    Fan-tas-tic!
    Never heard of them before, but they work great (also in Windows 10).
    Thank you very much, fdegrove and NavyLCDR!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    09 May 2016 #25

    Hi,

    Always glad to help.

    Cheers,
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    11 May 2016 #26

    Hello again,

    An update that I hope all Contributors may find very interesting.

    Besides starting this thread, I got in touch with the Author of the article UEFI/GPT-based hard drive partitions that I quoted so many times and that was at the origin of my doubts. He has been extremely kind and we exchanged a few emails that put definitely at rest the above mentioned doubts and I would like to share with all of you the final bottom line (permission to quote has been granted by the Author).

    “Windows Setup does not create the partition layout we recommend OEM partners use, but the partition layout created by Windows Setup is fully supported.”

    IMHO, this puts a seal on your being right about the opportunity of letting Windows 10 Setup to decide where to place the Recovery Partition during a Clean Installation.

    As far as I am concerned, case closed. Thank you, indeed, each and all of you!
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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