Windows 10: A Basic HDD Replacement Question

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
  1.    06 Feb 2016 #1

    A Basic HDD Replacement Question


    We have an HP All-In-One unit that originally came with Windows 8.1 about a 18 months ago. We upgraded to Windows 10 in September and it's been running great unit a few days ago when we got the following boot message:

    1720 - SMART Hard Drive detects imminent failure
    Failing Drive: SATAO
    Failing Attribute: # B8


    It would not boot into Windows and would only take me into the troubleshooter. I went to a command prompt and ran chkdsk /f, after which it did let me restart the computer, and although it seems to be okay, that same msg still appears at boot. It's just not preventing me from successfully getting into Windows any longer.

    So if I have to replace the drive what do I do to get the OS back to Windows 10. We, of course have no Windows 10 disk, or even an 8.1 disk. If I put a new HDD in the unit and turn it on will there be some facility for allowing me to get W10 back? Without a disk? Or even 8.1? We have everything important backed up on an external 1TB drive, so taking it back to factory settings is fine with us. Even if we have to go back to 8.1, I assume we could always re-upgrade, couldn't we?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    06 Feb 2016 #2

    Hi, having activated Win 10 on your PC, you can simply replace your HDD, and clean install Win 10 (x32 or x64 as you like). There should be no need to enter a license code. (I didn't have to). Worst case you'd need to contact MS, which should be relatively routine.

    You don't have to reinstall Win 8.

    Your best approach is to create a Win 10 install disk and proceed from there. Why? You can subsequently use it
    a. as a boot disk
    b. for an in place upgrade repair (see tutorial section) - a real plus feature in Win 10.
    c. It's one download.

    Personally I would skip updates while installing.
    As soon as you have your drivers configured, and a working environment, use disk imaging and create an image.

    Now, you have backups, great. But have you started to use disk imaging yet? (3rd party program recommended widely here for this).
    Why?
    - allows you to back up complete disks/partitions
    - would have allowed to to put a new disk in, and recover your PC EXACTLY AS IT WAS when imaged, in under an hour. A massive time saving.
    - you can mount the images and extract files
    - you can update your images (updates are smaller and faster)
    - can provide a migration route to a new PC by restoring to dissimilar hardware, or, as I've just done, 300 + programs, settings etc in about 3 hours (a lot of that processing the data).
    - allows you to restore a non-booting PC to the state it was in when you created the image in under an hour without tech assistance. (Hardware faults excepted).

    Macrium Reflect (free) doesn't support incremental imaging, but is extremely competent if a bit geeky. Currently I like O&O Diskimage 9 (not free) rather than Aomei Backupper (free is ok)

    You need a large external disk, and you must create the boot medium and ensure your BIOS/UEFI is configured or can be configured to boot from it.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    06 Feb 2016 #3

    Thanks. Never having dealt with a new HDD in either 8 or 10, I wasn't sure what would happen if I stuck an unformatted HDD in the computer and turned it on. Would it do anything? Would it tell me that no OS was detected? Or would the BIOS take over and talk me through a reinstall of 10? I guess you're telling me that the last option is what I should expect.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    06 Feb 2016 #4

    Blank disk = blank screen. You'll probably get a flashing white underline top left. Preceded by a manufacturer splash screen etc. BIOS or UEFI will load, that's all. As your specs are incomplete, I don't know which you're using. A problem you may face with UEFI is getting your PC to boot from an external bootable medium.

    BIOS and UEFI know nothing about Windows. You could equally install Linux.
    They only provide basic code that's loaded into RAM to enable you to use USB devices and DVD-ROM, and enough to start an OS running from a disk.

    As regards UEFI I'm on a learning curve just having set up my new custom laptop from a clean install of win 10 to 300+ progs and settings in about 4 hours work- with appropriate disk images and tools to do the heavy lifting. Getting its UEFI to offer boot options required me to press a key (F7) whilst booting - and then the options offered were relatively uninterpretable. (I.e. nothing as easy as 'DVD-RW' was on offer - there was DVDRAM buried in a string o characters. Hmm, BIOS was easy. But UEFI implementations vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, and from laptop to desktop. Then you run into Secure Boot (you want this off) and CSM (enabled for legacy e.g. USB boot it I vaguely recall).
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5. Night Hawk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,337
    W10 Pro x64/W7 Ultimate x64 dual boot main - W10 Pro Insider Preview/W7 Pro x64 - remote pc
       06 Feb 2016 #5

    You will want to review a few guides including one where you could have simply skipped the upgrade at this time unlike the initial requirement seen last summer to upgrade first and then seeing a clean install after 10 was activated the first time. Clean Install Windows 10 Directly without having to Upgrade First - Windows 10 Forums

    Since your's was a direct upgrade by way of the Windows updates you will be needing some 10 media to work with! Besides the next guide there are actually two options one being the immediate creation of the USB Installation Key requiring an 8gb or 16gb flash drive since the Threashold 2 Update wraps up both the 32bit and 64bit flavors of both the Home and Pro editions into one large update seen in November. The alternative is the download page at the MS Tech Bench Program site there where you choose either the 32bit or 64bit dual edition iso at the present time. Windows 10 ISO Download - Windows 10 Forums

    With the Media Creation tool mentioned in the guide there you can also download and save the "Windows.iso" file to a folder on the drive to have available. But you will first need to be on either another system or try running the "chkdks /r/f" command instead of the "chkdsk /f" since it appear the "/r" for repair seems to be working better lately the tne "/f" for Fix switch added onto the command. The iso download using the MC Tool will be a "4 in 1" while the Tech Bench is the dual edition being the main difference. At some were looking to see a consolation of editions made up for use on multiple systems while the November update had to be rolled up in order to work for everyone!

    And of course the last guide here to get you going once the All in One you have there is back running again or you are on another machine to view is the one seen at Windows 10 - Clean Install - Windows 10 Forums

    When going out to get another drive that will come in totally blank with nothing on it. You can follow the guide closely there or use a 3rd party drive partitioning program to see the replacement partitioned and formatted ahead of time and then won't need to use the Drive tools option when selecting the Custom option. That will simply avoid seeing the System Reserved partition created at the front of the drive being a problem for some at one time.

    The guide will also explain how to get past the UEFI problem that can prevent booting up from a flash drive which I was running into on an HP 7 laptop as well as a new 10 laptop lately where you are then forced to boot live from optical media. If that becomes the case the best option would be the direct download for the dual edition iso from Tech Bench and
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    06 Feb 2016 #6

    boweasel said: View Post
    We have everything important backed up on an external 1TB drive, so taking it back to factory settings is fine with us. Even if we have to go back to 8.1, I assume we could always re-upgrade, couldn't we?
    If it were me, I would just install Macrium Reflect Free, and create the rescue USB/DVD when prompted to. Save a backup image of the existing hard drive onto the external hard drive. Replace the hard drive in the All-In-One, boot from the Macrium rescue USB/DVD and restore the image from the external hard drive onto the new hard drive. Pick up right where you left off without re-installing anything.

    Macrium Reflect Free
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7. Night Hawk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,337
    W10 Pro x64/W7 Ultimate x64 dual boot main - W10 Pro Insider Preview/W7 Pro x64 - remote pc
       06 Feb 2016 #7

    My impression of this is that restoring an image of the current mess wouldn't be making any progress but work in the opposite direction. Since this was an upgrade install to 10 it's highly more probable to assume the upgrade came out buggy while the bugs simply took longer to appear unlike finding the Start button missing or not able to open things up in the Start menu like the AllApps! A clean install since everything important is already backed up on the external which would have to be unplugged by the way during the fresh 10 install would clean all this up.

    If you are not seeing a bugged up upgrade then you are likely seeing numerous disk errors on the drive which can also stall Windows from starting up and/or running properly. The Disk Check command with both the repair switches added to the command entered into the Command prompt(admin) option will schedule that again to see if cleaning things up will get 10 running again before a last resort being a clean install recommended or a fast second upgrade install to repair which is rather redundant. A clean install would be the option if cleaning up the disk errors fails to see effective results.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    06 Feb 2016 #8

    I would try the Macrium suggestion from NavyLCDR first. This way you will save all your programs, setting and data. If Windows 10 doesn't run right you could download the version of Windows 10 you have installed from TechNet. Mount the ISO by double clicking on it and run the setup.exe. This will reinstall Windows and all your programs and files will be intact.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    06 Feb 2016 #9

    Winuser said: View Post
    I would try the Macrium suggestion from NavyLCDR first. This way you will save all your programs, setting and data. If Windows 10 doesn't run right you could download the version of Windows 10 you have installed from TechNet. Mount the ISO by double clicking on it and run the setup.exe. This will reinstall Windows and all your programs and files will be intact.
    Agreed. You can always repair install or clean install over an image. But you can never restore an image that wasn't made.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    06 Feb 2016 #10

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    Agreed. You can always repair install or clean install over an image. But you can never restore an image that wasn't made.
    That is so true. With the prices of HDD's being so cheap it doesn't make sense not to make regular images of your drive and backups of your files. I just bought a 2 TB WD Passport Ultra from Walmart for $89.00.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Related Threads
I am throwing this open to everyone. What is the best desktop search replacement for Windows 10? I would like one that is fast can find all files / programs etc.. and can integrate with windows 10. Thank you.
Source: How to get a replacement AC power cord for your Surface Pro | Microsoft Devices Blog
Windows Media Centre replacement in Software and Apps
As i will not be getting the windows media centre that i paid extra for in windows 10 i will need a replace it must have: Have channels on same numbers as the TV Let me record things from the guide (series link) Must have at least 7 guide Let...
I really liked the Windows Photo Viewer in Windows 7... The photo viewer built into Windows 10 is terrible. Anyone know any good replacements? Something light weight.
Coming from Windows Vista to Windows 10. Have used both the Windows Movie Maker and Windows DVD Maker on Vista. I see there is a compatible version of Windows Movie Maker available for W10 and I have installed it. However, I'll be darned if I can...
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:47.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums