Dual boot Windows with Linux

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  1. Posts : 241
    Windows 10 Pro
       #1

    Dual boot Windows with Linux


    Is there a tutorial here (I didn't find, so maybe in another place there's a good tutorial?) on how to be able to install both Linux and Windows 10 on my laptop's hard drive?
    So that when I restart my laptop I will be able to choose from either Windows 10 or Linux?

    I did that once with Windows 7, and I remember I had 2 possibilities: Either to be able to choose through a Linux prompt at the startup, or through a Windows prompt. I tried both options. (It was either doing it via a Microsoft boot manager or via Linux boot manager or something like that, I just can't remember)

    Hope it's clear enough

    **Edit: I remember there was some sort of Linux boot manager if you install Linux AFTER Windows, and if you then delete Linux completely, you had to repair Windows boot loader (Or it was the other way?i.e installing Windows AFTER Linux and then repairing Windows boot loader?)

    Thanks!
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  2. Posts : 13,548
    Windows10
       #2

    Load of guides on web eg

    How To Install Ubuntu Linux Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI) Everyday Linux User

    Main thing is to install Windows 10 first, then Linux.
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  3. Posts : 241
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Ty, and I found out what I was looking for:
    If you install Linux after you install Windows, Linux sets its own boot manager GRUB, and if you want to delete Linux partition, it will remove GRUB as well, leaving you without Windows boot manager, so you have to use a repair DVD/USB.
    That was back in Windows 7. Maybe now in 10 it's different?
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  4. Posts : 56
    macOS Sierra, Windows 10 Pro
       #4

    Sadly that's still the case. I hate grub with a passion. I use rEFInd boot manager now with every UEFI computer.
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  5. Posts : 5,440
    windows 10 Pro ver 21H2 build 19044.1348
       #5

    mibaup said:
    Ty, and I found out what I was looking for:
    If you install Linux after you install Windows, Linux sets its own boot manager GRUB, and if you want to delete Linux partition, it will remove GRUB as well, leaving you without Windows boot manager, so you have to use a repair DVD/USB.
    That was back in Windows 7. Maybe now in 10 it's different?
    I once had my Win 10 Home dual boot with Linux Mint 17.2
    I used this tutorial when I decided to remove Linux.
    http://www.howtogeek.com/141818/how-...your-computer/

    The key part starts at ......Fix the Windows Boot Loader
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  6. Posts : 241
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #6

    z31fanatic said:
    Sadly that's still the case. I hate grub with a passion. I use rEFInd boot manager now with every UEFI computer.
    What is it? Is there an article / tutorial I can read about it?

    davidhk said:
    I once had my Win 10 Home dual boot with Linux Mint 17.2
    I used this tutorial when I decided to remove Linux.
    http://www.howtogeek.com/141818/how-...your-computer/

    The key part starts at ......Fix the Windows Boot Loader
    Thanks!

    Btw, I remember that, I tried several things, at first I used GRUB, and then I fixed Windows boot manager, but then I remember I found a way to use some sort of Windows boot manager, so when you removed Linux, Windows remained working. But I forgot its name. I just remember it was looking as if it was a part of DOS itself rather than Linux's color and font. Maybe you know what I'm talking about?

    *Edit: I think I found it, it's called EasyBCD
    Last edited by mibaup; 01 Feb 2016 at 01:59.
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  7. Posts : 5,478
    2004
       #7

    The real question is whether your PC is UEFI or BIOS.

    If your PC is BIOS there is a guide here for using EasyBCD to add a Linux boot entry to the windows boot loader. How can I add Linux to the new Windows 8 boot manager? - Super User

    However as it says (and it is right) it is slower to do it this way as the Windows boot loader is shown after the last OS is loaded. This means if you were running windows and wanted to reboot into Linux it would reload Windows, then you would select Linux and it would shut down again and only then load Linux. If that matters you'd be better off with GRUB.

    If you use UEFI then I'd second rEFInd. It automatically identifies Windows , OSX and every type of Linux I've installed (with the exception of Arch Linux) on any internal of external drive. You just have to copy it to the EFI partition and register it - no configuration is needed. It is slightly easier to install from Linux but there are instructions to manually copy it to EFI from Windows here. If you remove Linux you can leave it or remove it as you wish - Windows will still boot fine.
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  8. Posts : 241
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #8

    It is UEFI.
    Btw, can I get a clarification: I found out that it is UEFI, the BIOS looks the same.
    At first I thought UEFI is only when you have that nice graphical BIOS rather than that blue screen BIOS.
    But I guess UEFI is something else:)
    ( I checked that I have UEFI in the BIOS itself and through Windows in system info)
    And I guess I will stick to GRUB and simply insert a Windows 10 dvd / usb whenever I delete Linux, as it's a really simple thing to do nowadays.
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  9. Posts : 56
    macOS Sierra, Windows 10 Pro
       #9

    mibaup said:
    What is it? Is there an article / tutorial I can read about it?
    The rEFInd Boot Manager

    All it takes to install it is three lines in the Linux terminal

    sudo apt-add-repository ppa:rodsmith/refind
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install refind
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  10. Posts : 241
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Is it possible to install refind from Windows? Btw, if I understand, refind is a GUI for choosing the installed OS's?
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