Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
  1.    29 Jan 2016 #11
    Join Date : Oct 2015
    Posts : 14
    10x64
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    To appease the naysayers, I edited my post #4.



    I thought your reason for going to Pro was to encrypt the hard drive?
    Old mid-range mid-2011-era computer with Windows 10 Pro didn't have hardware support for encryption (and a hostile early-2012 SSD thanks to the SandForce compression heavy controller). Now I've learned the lesson and bought a new better than midrange computer with the TPM and everything, but the MSFT Signature Edition computers come with Windows 10 Home. Hence my desire to reuse my old license, **** the ****er that stole from me, and enable encryption in the new PC.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    29 Jan 2016 #12

    Quote Originally Posted by sn00ker View Post
    Just because its stolen it still activated unless he calls Microsoft and they flag his 8 pro key and give him new 8 key which at that time he can take the upgrade root .

    What would be the difference if a PC was stolen or if one was to sell it, coming from 8.0 to 8.1 to 10?
    Well if you sell a computer with the activated OS your required to give the OS media in other words you sold the license. This situation I would call Microsoft and explain the situation and see if the would activate on the new machine. Also if the stolen was registered with the OEM if it's ever repaired is can be tracked by serial #.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    29 Jan 2016 #13
    Join Date : Nov 2015
    Posts : 4,885
    windows 10 Home threshold2

    Let's not go off topic, please.

    If I understand the OP's situation correctly............................
    The OP had a laptop stolen. It has a Retail Win 8 Pro installed in it and then upgraded to Win 10 Pro.
    Now the OP has a new laptop running Win 10 Home.
    The OP wants to know if he/she can use the same Retail Win 8 Pro key to install/activate Win 10 Pro over the Win 10 Home.

    If the above info is correct, then my answer was and still is......................... the OP can NOT use the same Win 8 Pro key because it is tied to the stolen laptop.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    30 Jan 2016 #14
    Join Date : Aug 2015
    Posts : 415
    10 pro 64 clean install

    Quote Originally Posted by davidhk View Post
    Let's not go off topic, please.

    If I understand the OP's situation correctly............................
    The OP had a laptop stolen. It has a Retail Win 8 Pro installed in it and then upgraded to Win 10 Pro.
    Now the OP has a new laptop running Win 10 Home.
    The OP wants to know if he/she can use the same Retail Win 8 Pro key to install/activate Win 10 Pro over the Win 10 Home.

    If the above info is correct, then my answer was and still is......................... the OP can NOT use the same Win 8 Pro key because it is tied to the stolen laptop.
    Have you ever had a software stolen from you? I had my XP key stolen once from me. I called MS about it and they just flagged my key and gave me a new set . Now whether MS still does this pcuaron should call them and see if they'll do like wise. If they do, then pcuaron will once again be able to get 10 pro.

    PS: I also had other software stolen. All I did was to have them flagged, which is what people should do with stolen software, why give the crooks a freebie
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    30 Jan 2016 #15
    Join Date : Jan 2014
    Posts : 1,395
    Windows 10 Pro (32-bit) 16299.15

    Quote Originally Posted by pcuaron View Post
    Old mid-range mid-2011-era computer with Windows 10 Pro didn't have hardware support for encryption (and a hostile early-2012 SSD thanks to the SandForce compression heavy controller).
    I know it's slightly off topic, but just to correct this - you don't need a TPM to use Bitlocker. See this Tutorial on how to do it:
    https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/3...dows-10-a.html
    I use Bitlocker on a computer from around 2006.
    (It wouldn't have helped with the SSD problem though.)

    Quote Originally Posted by pcuaron View Post
    Hence my desire to reuse my old license, **** the ****er that stole from me, and enable encryption in the new PC
    Also, you don't need always the Pro version of Windows to enable encryption. If you have a computer which supports the 'InstantGo' specifications (which are admittedly quite stringent - the OS drive must be a non-spinning disk for instance, and Secure Boot must be enabled) then Device Encryption will be there in Windows Home.

    Edit: If you to to a command prompt on your new laptop, and type
    Code:
    powercfg/a
    what does it say? Does it include anything about 'Connected' standby or similar?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    30 Jan 2016 #16

    Quote Originally Posted by davidhk View Post
    Let's not go off topic, please.

    If I understand the OP's situation correctly............................
    The OP had a laptop stolen. It has a Retail Win 8 Pro installed in it and then upgraded to Win 10 Pro.
    Now the OP has a new laptop running Win 10 Home.
    The OP wants to know if he/she can use the same Retail Win 8 Pro key to install/activate Win 10 Pro over the Win 10 Home.

    If the above info is correct, then my answer was and still is......................... the OP can NOT use the same Win 8 Pro key because it is tied to the stolen laptop.
    OEM keys are are tied to the originally activated device - Retail keys can be transferred to another ( the EULA requires it to be uninstalled prior - not possible in this case, obviously) but the activation server does not check that.
    The OP can thus activate a 2nd PC with the original retail key of the same edition.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    30 Jan 2016 #17
    Join Date : Aug 2015
    Posts : 415
    10 pro 64 clean install

    Quote Originally Posted by Superfly View Post
    Retail keys can be transferred to another ( the EULA requires it to be uninstalled prior - not possible in this case, obviously) but the activation server does not check that.
    The OP can thus activate a 2nd PC with the original retail key of the same edition.
    So by your logic anyone with a retail version can do like wise over and over and over, which is wrong. If a person gets their key flagged by MS those key will be useless once whom ever try to do a re installation it wouldn't get activated again. I would like to see how this will turn out since windows 10 is different ( free ) . I wonder if MS still can deactivated a pc that's been activated . I would imagine they can
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    30 Jan 2016 #18

    Quote Originally Posted by sn00ker View Post
    So by your logic anyone with a retail version can do like wise over and over and over, which is wrong. If a person gets their key flagged by MS those key will be useless once whom ever try to do a re installment it wouldn't get activated again. I would like to see how this will turn out since windows 10 is different ( free ) . I wonder if MS still can deactivated a pc that's been activated . I would imagine they can
    It's not my logic, it's been tried and tested. MS has tolerances built into activation...they must have their reasons for lack of enforcement by the activation server.
    Each key has a certain activation count on changed hardware which differs between full retail = most, upgrade = less and OEM = none.
    Like it or not, that's the way it is...
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    30 Jan 2016 #19
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,551
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by sn00ker View Post
    So by your logic anyone with a retail version can do like wise over and over and over, which is wrong. If a person gets their key flagged by MS those key will be useless once whom ever try to do a re installation it wouldn't get activated again. I would like to see how this will turn out since windows 10 is different ( free ) . I wonder if MS still can deactivated a pc that's been activated . I would imagine they can
    First - a person is allowed to reuse and activate a retail product key over and over. That's in the EULA. So Microsoft has to allow repeated activations to comply with the EULA. What Microsoft does not do is require proof of removals for a grace period. There are many ways to remove the old OS. The drive can be wiped with a third party program. The hard drive can fail. The hard drive can be physically destroyed. So there is no guarantee that a specific routine to contact Microsoft activation servers to remove the activation would be run. In fact, in most situations, the user would likely not run such a routine when removing the old OS.

    So, how about periodic contacting Microsoft by the computer to verify activation? For one thing, the EULA does not require a person to have an internet connection to run Windows. Second - what about when I take my personal computer on deployment on a ship for 9 months and I can't connect it to the internet? So that is non-starter.

    Now - after a certain number of activations of the same product key in a certain period of time, Microsoft does require proof of removal before a new activation is granted. I have product keys like that. The proof of removal that Microsoft requires is for me to call them and tell the computer voice that I have that Windows installed on only one computer. This is also coming up on Windows 10 upgrades using manually entered Windows 7/8 product keys. The user gets a message that the product key is in use on another computer. In order to activate those they have to install Windows 7 or Windows 8. Call Microsoft and tell them it is installed on only one computer to activate the Windows 7 or 8. Then that Windows 7/8 product key can be used to activate Windows 10 on the same computer.

    So what about remote deactivation? That would require a change to EULA that the user would have to agree to first. Again - public opinion. Think of the complaints MS would get if they even proposed requiring a user to agree to allow Microsoft to deactivate their Windows remotely. Not going to happen. There are security programs the user can install that allows them to remotely wipe their computer after the trigger is pulled and the target computer connects to the internet.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    30 Jan 2016 #20
    Join Date : Aug 2014
    Forever West
    Posts : 3,983
    Win10 Home and Pro, Win10 Insider Preview, Win7 Home, Linux Mint

    This is the EULA/End User License Agreement on my Win10 Pro Retail that was Upgraded from Win8.1 Pro back in the first week of August:
    Attachment 61617
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


Similar Threads
Thread Forum
Windows 10 Home Full-Retail license to Windows 10 PRO using MSDN Key
Hi A question about license and activation. I bought several months ago a Windows 8.1 Home Full-Retail license that I had used until I've upgraded to Windows 10 on the day-one (29-7). Since a couple of month I've a Msdn subscription from my...
Windows Updates and Activation
Clean Install/Retail Windows 7 License
I have a retail version of Win 7. I have been using on a separate machine, the Windows Insider Technical Preview. It is my understanding that you MUST upgrade before doing a clean install. 1) Is that true? 2) Do I get a new license number? 3)...
Installation and Upgrade
HOW do I transfer windows (retail license) after upgrading to Windows
According to this Microsoft Community thread: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/how-do-i-transfer-windows-retail-license-after/6ee1dfe0-8adc-4cce-a46a-748963cf56d1?rtAction=1438237655029 when we...
Windows Updates and Activation
Transferring a Win 10 to a new PC, with a free upgrade license
This may already have been answered, but I haven't seen it answered in a way that I thought captured the significant details. Scenario: I have a PC with a retail copy of Win 8.1 Pro installed and activated. I get the free Win 10 Pro upgrade by...
Installation and Upgrade
Retail license W10 upgrade permanent?
So the MS position on upgraded Win 7 / 8 machines is straight-forward: for the life of the device. But what does this mean for non-OEM people, who are using a retail Windows license, which they upgrade to Windows 10? If they get a new PC, and...
General Support
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:37.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums