win10 v.1902 worked all night upgrading to 20H2. Never actually did


  1. Posts : 69
    Windows 10 pro, 64 bit
       #1

    win10 v.1902 worked all night upgrading to 20H2. Never actually did


    I have two old DEL T5400 machines running windows v.1909. I finally let one upgrade. I used the Windows 10 update assistant which checked my system to make sure all was "well" for the upgrade to 22H2. I started the upgrade around 1PM yesterday afternoon and finally said it was completed around 11PM, and then said "working on updates, do not turn off your PC, your PC will restart several times". I checked on the "%" about once an hour to see if there was progress, but by 1:30AM it was only at about 20%, and I went to bed. This morning I turn on the monitor and see my familiar desktop and login, and soon did a "winver" to check what had changed. Not surprisingly, I'm still at 1909. Further, it looks like after manually restarting, I'm back at "working on updates, do not turn off your PC, your PC will restart several times". Since there was no explanation anywhere as to why the machine wasted an entire day and accomplished nothing, I'm looking for a way to (1) find out exactly why nothing changed, and (2) if the machine has a problem making upgrades impossible, how to cancel further attempts so I can avoid getting bogged down in endless attempts every time I re-boot, thus making any use impossible for hours.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 16,914
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 22H2 Build 19045.4170
       #2

    I have seen suggestions in some threads that older versions need to update to version 2004 and only then can they update to a current version.
    I didn't make any notes about the topic.

    I think the HeiDoc option [Option 4] is the only source for version 2004 ISOs now.

    Download Windows 10 ISO File -TenForumsTutorials
    In-place upgrade [aka Repair Install] - TenForumsTutorials

    dalchina says in the next post that you ought to be able to update all the way through & that the interim stage I suggested is not necessary.
    That saves some work.


    Best of luck,
    Denis
    Last edited by Try3; 13 Apr 2023 at 10:20.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 42,922
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #3

    Hi, I agree with the above post that some have reported that- but I had PCs on 1903 and upgraded them to 20H2 and later directly.

    First, considering the failure:
    There are many threads you can review on upgrade failures. So, once again:

    Attempting to diagnose upgrade failures successfully
    a. is hard
    b. requires great experience and study to have any great likelihood of success
    c. is iterative and time-consuming
    d. is fraught with difficulty

    So, once again:
    1. Record the exact and precise error message if any. Research that.
    2. Post a screenshot of your partitions using a 3rd party partition manager (Minitool Partition Wizard)
    3. ensure you have at least 30Gb free on C:
    4. Ensure you have no O/S partitions on other disks.
    5. Check the integrity of your installed O/S-
    a. Run chkdsk c: /scan from an admin command prompt-
    b. if ok, similarly run SFC /SCANNOW
    Check they pass.
    6. Run setupdiag.exe (free from MS) - tries ot analyse upgrade log failures against some known cases.
    7. Completely remove any 3rd party security programs.


    Blocking further attempts to upgrade:
    Considering
    I finally let one upgrade.
    - implies you had disabled Windows Update somehow.
    how to cancel further attempts so I can avoid getting bogged down in endless attempts
    Set 'target feature update' - see tutorial- from the Tutorials section, or, assuming you are fully up to date with 1909, simply disable Windows Update altogether.

    Note the forum asked this:
    win10 v.1902 worked all night upgrading to 20H2. Never actually  did-win-10-version.png
    (so we don't have to keep asking)
    - so I don't know if you already are fully up to date.

    Sometimes attempting an upgrade using an iso file of a later build but without accepting updates as part of the upgrade process helps.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 69
    Windows 10 pro, 64 bit
    Thread Starter
       #4

    dalchina said:
    Hi, I agree with the above post that some have reported that- but I had PCs on 1903 and upgraded them to 20H2 and later directly.

    First, considering the failure:
    There are many threads you can review on upgrade failures. So, once again:

    Attempting to diagnose upgrade failures successfully
    a. is hard
    b. requires great experience and study to have any great likelihood of success
    c. is iterative and time-consuming
    d. is fraught with difficulty
    Thanks. I've read all you wrote and here are my thoughts... First yes, I have been blocking updates. Once before I think I successfully went from go from 1903 to 1909. I recall also trying to upgrade again (though beyond recalling it had a "H" in the version and that the attempt was over a year ago) and the update failed, leaving me with the same v.1909. (These are all "online" updates, by the way, never using an ISO file or DVD) As with this attempt, last time there was no explanation or error messages as to why it failed, so I decided there might be a flaw in Microsoft's update process, or their analysis (via windows update assistant) telling me I could do the update. (the nev version after all was "new", so maybe the upgrade bugs hadn't been worked out"). So, thinking maybe the process improved I thought I'd try again.

    Since you asked, I block all updates from Microsoft by using a DNS service that allows me to list unwanted URLs using "parental restrictions" options. When I DO want to go to Microsoft (either with a browser or to update) I first go into my Ethernet (or in this case Wifi) adapter setting and change the DNS back to Google (8.8.8.8) and my router's default as an alternate.

    Anyway, the last time I had a failed attempt, and used the DNS settings to block further attempts, I was not in this situation! Last time, the process completed, rebooted, and just left me back in 1909. Subsequent reboots just took me back to the same 1909 login.

    This time, however, after the upgrade process completes (and lies to me saying all that is needed now is a restart) there seem to be a boatload or updates that are waiting for me to reboot. So when i do, I get this big blue screen (not a BSOD) telling this "Working on updates, do not turn off your PC, Your PC will restart several times", along with a % complete). As I can't sit by the machine all day waiting to see what happens, I'll just have to wait for it to finish and once again see when my existing login appears. (And it WILL take all day, and probably some of the evening!)
    |
    So when it does, besides doing my DNS trick, and looking in any system settings to disable updates as best I can, is there something I can delete that is being set to divert subsequent restarts, to attempting to go around this circle of attempting to install all the updates it has apparently stored?

    The thing is, Microsoft is no into windows 11 (so much for the promise that Win-10 would be the last), and the machine is old. But we're retired and can't just waste money on new machines often (I bought these Dell T5400 machines in 2020 with windows already installed, and these are already 13 y/o machines then). So this upgrade attempt was just a failed experiment. If today's re-attempt succeeds I don't think its worth my time to go through what seems like days of work to try and find out why. So at that point I just want the machine back in usable service (with 1909), but without doing anything but normal rebooting.

    So is there a file or folder with all the "updates" I can delete? And is there a setting that will eliminate the attempt to re-try updates with each re-boot? And if there are simple settings to block updates, can you point me to it? I saw some thing on google about group policies, but could not figure out how to use it.

    Thanks for any help
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 42,922
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #5

    I don't really see a response to the rest of my post...

    As to the many updates you mention, I've already suggested upgrading using an iso file, without accepting updates as part of the procedure - assuming you get as far as that prompt. (Hint- completely disconnect the internet).

    And is there a setting that will eliminate the attempt to re-try updates with each re-boot? And if there are simple settings to block updates, can you point me to it? I saw some thing on google about group policies, but could not figure out how to use it.
    I've actually already answered that- and it's a widely published answer, as it is on tenforums.

    target feature update - in the searchable Tutorials section.

    Here's your step by step guide to searching the Tutorials section.
    a. Click Tutorials at the top.
    b. Copy and paste
    target feature update
    into the search box - thus:
    win10 v.1902 worked all night upgrading to 20H2. Never actually  did-untitled.png

    You should see
    win10 v.1902 worked all night upgrading to 20H2. Never actually  did-1.jpg

    This is the tutorial:
    How to Specify Target Feature Update Version in Windows 10

    Three options. Only Options 2 or 3 are available in 1909.
    If you wish not to be offered a feature update beyond 1909, then you specify 1909.

    Assuming the repeat attempt to update you are experiencing is to upgrade to a build later than 1909, that should no longer happen.
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 69
    Windows 10 pro, 64 bit
    Thread Starter
       #6

    dalchina said:
    I don't really see a response to the rest of my post...

    As to the many updates you mention, I've already suggested upgrading using an iso file, without accepting updates as part of the procedure - assuming you get as far as that prompt. (Hint- completely disconnect the internet).
    Thanks! If I do make another update attempt that's what I'll do then. In the mean time, the info and links you sent me did allow me to clear out existing update downloads, block automated attempts, and get my system back to normal usage. Thanks for all the help!
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 42,922
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #7

    You've got somehting to play with should you wish to reattempt.
      My Computers


 

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