Physically move SSD formatted in GPT to older laptop.


  1. Posts : 128
    Windows 10
       #1

    Physically move SSD formatted in GPT to older laptop.


    Windows 10. Unknown version on the SSD since I cannot boot from it.

    I have two laptops. Laptop A is a newer laptop with Windows 10 that had a SSD upgrade but the laptop is dead now. SSD is still good and is formatted in GPT. It also seems to have Bitlocker enabled on the OS partition but is in the unlocked state.

    Laptop B is an older laptop that still works and was a Windows 7 machine. I am just trying to take the SSD from laptop A and install in laptop B. Laptop B says please insert proper boot device when the SSD is installed. I am assuming this is because the SSD is formatted in GPT and Bitlocker is enabled along with the boot files/partitions aren't correct.

    What are the steps needed to take the SSD and boot from it in laptop B? Please see attachment for partitions.

    Thank you!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Physically move SSD formatted in GPT to older laptop.-2021-12-03_15-29-22.png  
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  2. steve108's Avatar
    Posts : 18,882
    19041.1466 - 2004/20H1 Pro x64
       #2

    If laptop B BIOS supports UEFI mode, you can try switching the BIOS to UEFI mode and see if the GPT SSD from LT A boots.
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  3. steve108's Avatar
    Posts : 18,882
    19041.1466 - 2004/20H1 Pro x64
       #3

    You could also try GPT to MBR : How to Convert GPT Disk to MBR Disk | MiniTool Tutorial I'm not sure if the current free version supports GPT to MBR conversion.

    after you make a full backup of the SSD A using Backup and Restore with Macrium Reflect . Be sure to make a bootable MR Rescue USB too.
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  4. Posts : 128
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #4

    I'll give it a go and report back. Thanks!
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  5. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 16,772
    Windows 11 Pro
       #5

    Your best bet would be to make a backup image of C: drive (Windows) partition only with Macrium Reflect Free. Then erase all the partitions on the SSD, (diskpart clean command). Convert to MBR (also diskpart command). Create a small system partition (100 mb, NTFS, marked as active). Restore the C: drive partition. Create boot files in the system partition you created with the bcdboot command.
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  6. Megahertz's Avatar
    Posts : 3,503
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #6

    NavyLCDR said:
    Your best bet would be to make a backup image of C: drive (Windows) partition only with Macrium Reflect Free. Then erase all the partitions on the SSD, (diskpart clean command). Convert to MBR (also diskpart command). Create a small system partition (100 mb, NTFS, marked as active). Restore the C: drive partition. Create boot files in the system partition you created with the bcdboot command.


    It is always good to have a backup image but you can convert the drive into MBR without loosing data (with MiniTool Partition), format the EFI partition (fat32) into NTFS ,set it as Active, rename it to System (also with with MiniTool Partition), and load it with the boot files with the bcdboot command.
    Last edited by Megahertz; 05 Dec 2021 at 20:14.
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