Windows update messed up system, cannot boot. How to fix bootloader?

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  1. Posts : 25
    Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #11

    Navigate to C:\windows\system32\drivers and rename the klelam.sys to klelam.sys.bak

    There is no file of that name in that location nor could I find it looking through basically every other location I could think of looking....

    Is there a command to do a file search? I couldn't find one looking online (closest was using dism to list 3rd party drivers).
      My Computer

  2. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 4,248
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #12

    Device drivers stored at \windows\system32\drivers folder, there is no need for you to look for the klelam.sys driver in any other directory.

    You can uninstall the third party drivers from offline Windows Operating Systems using Command Prompt within Windows Recovery Environment.



    Boot the computer into Windows Recovery Environment and open the Command Prompt.
    Display information about all drivers in an offline operating system.


    Code:
    Dism /image:D:\ /Get-Drivers


    Replace the D:\ drive letter with the assigned drive letter of the Windows OS installed partition.


    Display information about an INF file installed.
    Installed 3rd party drivers will be named OEM1.inf, OEM2.inf, and so on.
    Use the Published Name from the /Get-Drivers list to view information on installed drivers.

    [glow=red]EXAMPLE[/glow]

    Code:
    Dism /image:D:\ /Get-DriverInfo /Driver:oem1.inf


    Replace the D:\ drive letter with the assigned drive letter of the Windows OS installed partition.
    Also replace the oem1.inf driver name with the driver name you want to view its details.



    Removes driver package from an offline Windows operating system.

    [glow=red]EXAMPLE[/glow]

    Code:
    DISM /Image:D:\ /Remove-Driver /Driver:oem1.inf


    Replace the D:\ drive letter with the assigned drive letter of the Windows OS installed partition.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 25
    Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #13

    FreeBooter said:
    Device drivers stored at \windows\system32\drivers folder, there is no need for you to look for the klelam.sys driver in any other directory.
    As I said, it's not there. How can it be corrupted if it doesn't exist?
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  4. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 4,248
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #14

    Are you using Kaspersky Anti-Virus?
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 25
    Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #15

    "Hi all, doing this for a friend. I did the initial install a month or so ago and it's been great. A day or so ago, he reports that Windows did an update overnight and ever since, it's stuck in the system repair boot loop."

    Is Kaspersky installed? No idea.

    I can't say, as this isn't my machine. I do occasional free work for pensioners. While I do reinstall legit OS's, I'm basic services only. I don't sell AV.


    I'll check the program files tomorrow.
      My Computer

  6. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 4,248
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #16

    What you can do is run the Startup Repair and post the SrtTrail.txt log file for me to check.
      My Computer



  7. Posts : 25
    Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #17

    FreeBooter said:
    What you can do is run the Startup Repair and post the SrtTrail.txt log file for me to check.
    Attached.
    Looks the same as the first one. I realized that it's looking for klelam.sys in the 508mb recovery partition (F:, when booted to RE USB). Btw, I ran sfc /scannow (off boot E: & Win C: dir's) and it completed successfully-- no issues. There is no Kaspersky in Program Files nor Program Files x86.

    Edit: Also tried "Disable early launch anti-malware protection", which did nothing, same error/bluescreen.
    Windows update messed up system, cannot boot. How to fix bootloader? Attached Files
      My Computer

  8. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 4,248
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #18

    If the log file is new, then Startup Repair complaining corrupt klelam.sys driver. If you're seeing blue screen death error message (also known as a blue screen or BSoD), it can be caused by poorly written device drivers or malfunctioning hardware, such as faulty memory, power supply issues, overheating of components, or hardware running beyond its specification limits.

    You can ask for BSoD error assistance at https://www.tenforums.com/bsod-crashes-debugging/ forum.


    Please boot your computer with Windows Setup Media and from Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

    Please type the below command into Command Prompt and press the Enter key.

    The following command scans integrity of all protected Windows system files and repairs files with problems when possible.

    Code:
    Sfc  /Scannow   /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\   /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows


    Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter. When the computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment, the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assigned any other drive letter, usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit | find "osdevice" command can be used to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition, the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 25
    Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #19

    FreeBooter said:
    The following command scans integrity of all protected Windows system files and repairs files with problems when possible.

    Code:
    Sfc  /Scannow   /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\   /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows

    As I stated, I've done this using the drive letters required and it reports no issues. Chkdsk, the same. I ran Memtest too and no issues.

    Is there a way to wipe the system reserved and replace with whatever is required to boot properly?

    Edit: this laptop has been running fine until a recent Windows update knifed it. I can always reinstall-- I'm trying to understand how a Microsoft update could destroy a system, so inoperable, in this way? Is this another MS "nail-in-the-coffin", forcing people to fill landfills with viable machines just so they can improve sales Xmas/2022?
    Last edited by Geekomatic; 01 Aug 2021 at 09:36.
      My Computer

  10. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 4,248
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #20

    Uninstall last installed and pending Windows updates offline using Dism command,


    Please boot your computer with Windows Installation Media and from Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

    Displays information about all packages that are installed by executing below command.


    Code:
    Dism /image:C:\  /Get-Packages
    Found all Windows updates which you can identify by their KB number and take note of the Package Identity entry update (Package) name you want to uninstall. Also take note of the installation date of the update you want to uninstall.

    For example, execute the following command to uninstall the KB4053577 update:

    Code:
    dism  /image:C:\   /Remove-Package  /PackageName:Package_for_KB4053577~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0

    Please replace partition letter C: with Windows installed partition letter. When the computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment, the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assigned any other drive letter, usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be used to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition, the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
      My Computer


 
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