Upgrading from Win7 to Win10 - on a dual-boot laptop

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  1. Posts : 79
    Windows 7, Windows 10, Linux Mint
       #1

    Upgrading from Win7 to Win10 - on a dual-boot laptop


    This is probably an unfair question to ask in this forum. But given the depth of expertise, someone might have advice to offer!

    I have recently done successful clean installs and activations of Win 10 with the help of Shawn Brink's tutorials and advice from other forum members.

    I also have a laptop which has Win 7 Pro installed, along with Linux Mint in a dual boot setup. Both in Legacy/BIOS mode. I am using what seems to be a less-typical option for dual-booting. The normal [Linux] approach is to have the Linux bootloader "GRUB" take over from, and replace, the Windows boot manager in the MBR, and boot either OS. The hazard with this is that any Windows upgrade which affects the Windows boot manager will fail, and perhaps also affect the GRUB - potentially rendering both systems unbootable.

    But there is another way. A clever program called EasyBCD can be installed in Windows. It modifies the Windows bootloader so that it can "see" the Linux OS on a separate partition and offer the option to boot into it. It works well.

    I would now like to upgrade the Win7 to Win10. In theory, it seems that I can do an in-place upgrade (I've read the tutorial...). This is supposed to preserve all existing files, apps and settings in Win7 and move them onward to the Win 10 install. The main exception seems to be third-party AV programs, which need to be removed from Win7 and then reinstalled in Win10 after the upgrade.

    Now here is my question. Will an in-place upgrade of Win 7 keep, and transfer, my EasyBCD program and settings - and the changes it has made to the Windows bootloader to enable dual boot with Linux - to Win 10?

    The simple answer may be I won't know till I try, and the upgrade process will, or should, alert me - before it runs - if EasyBCD (like AV programs) won't play nicely. But I'd be curious to know if anyone else who dual-boots in this way has successfully run the Win7 to Win10 upgrade.

    I have posted in the EasyBCD forum as well, but it's not very busy.....
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  2. Megahertz's Avatar
    Posts : 2,746
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #2

    I would do a drive image and save it on an external drive. Better be safe than sorry.

    With EasyBCD, I would remove the Linux option before doing an in place upgrade.
    Once win10 is installed and running, run EasyBCD and add the Linux option.
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  3. Posts : 79
    Windows 7, Windows 10, Linux Mint
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Megahertz said:
    I would do a drive image and save it on an external drive. Better be safe than sorry.

    With EasyBCD, I would remove the Linux option before doing an in place upgrade.
    Once win10 is installed and running, run EasyBCD and add the Linux option.
    Thanks, Megahertz. I had intended to make a drive image before any changes.... just forgot to mention it!
    Your advice is in line with my thinking. Make the Win7 to Win10 upgrade as simple as possible by removing Linux from the system (after all, it's very easy to reinstate Linux - and EasyBCD - after the upgrade).

    Would it be wise not only to uninstall/remove Linux Mint, but also to delete the partitions it occupies? It occurs to me that the Windows upgrade process might run better if doesn't have to take account of any unidentified or empty partitions on the hard drive. Again, I can easily sort out and recreate partitions for a Linux reinstall once Win 10 is successfully in place.
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  4. Megahertz's Avatar
    Posts : 2,746
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #4

    If you have more than 30G free on the C: drive I think you don't need to uninstall Mint.
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  5. SoFine409's Avatar
    Posts : 1,311
    Win10 Pro
       #5

    Just my 2 cents but I’d just go ahead and remove Linux Mint then upgrade to Win10 and after it’s running and updated then you can install the latest version of Mint. I think it’s 20.1.
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  6. Ghot's Avatar
    Posts : 10,724
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19043.1055 (x64) [21H1]
       #6

    @br1anstorm

    I would remove Mint (temporarily), then do a "clean install" of Windows 10. Use you Windows 7 key only.
    Upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10 causes a lot of problems.

    There will be some programs and quite a few drivers on your Windows 7 install that will incompatible with Windows 10.


    Remove Mint and any 3rd party AV or encryption software, then clean install Windows 10.
    Get Windows 10 up to date, get Device Manager happy, install the programs you want to use.
    Make a backup.
    Then install Mint and 3rd party AV or encryption software... get all that functioning properly, then make another backup.


    THEN you will have a stable system, and you will have backups to the time of the clean install.


    Side note: An In-Place Upgrade is really for upgrading from one version of Windows 10 to a newer version of Windows 10. It also works to repair a Windows 10 installation.
    To go from Windows 7 to Windows 10... a "clean install" is really the best method.
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  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    Posts : 5,695
    Windows 10 Home 20H2
       #7

    Re-install Mint only when all is fine after clean installing Windows 10.
    Upgrading could cause problems, which you will have to spend much time fixing.
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  8. Megahertz's Avatar
    Posts : 2,746
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #8

    Ghot said:
    Side note: An In-Place Upgrade is really for upgrading from one version of Windows 10 to a newer version of Windows 10. It also works to repair a Windows 10 installation.
    To go from Windows 7 to Windows 10... a "clean install" is really the best method.
    Sorry Ghot,
    I've done twice Win 7 to win 10 running In-Place Upgrade (running setup.exe from running windows),. No problems at all.

    I do agree that a Clean install is the best option.
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  9. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    Posts : 5,695
    Windows 10 Home 20H2
       #9

    On October 15, 2015, I clean installed Windows 7 and immediately upgraded it to Windows 10.
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  10. Ghot's Avatar
    Posts : 10,724
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19043.1055 (x64) [21H1]
       #10

    Megahertz said:
    Sorry Ghot,
    I've done twice Win 7 to win 10 running In-Place Upgrade (running setup.exe from running windows),. No problems at all.

    I do agree that a Clean install is the best option.



    I didn't mean to intimate it wouldn't work...just that it wasn't the best or even the suggested method.

    Like I said above...you're messing with possibly incompatible drivers and programs. Why put yourself through that if you don't have to.
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