Installation/Upgrade Question?

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  1. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #21

    I've never had boot issues with cloning.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 39,969
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #22

    NavyLCDR said:
    I've never had boot issues with cloning.
    For the clone the OP needs MBR2GPT without data loss.
    For the image restoration MBR2GPT is not required.

    Some MBR2GPT display error codes that need troubleshooting.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #23

    zbook said:
    For the clone the OP needs MBR2GPT without data loss.
    For the image restoration MBR2GPT is not required.

    Some MBR2GPT display error codes that need troubleshooting.
    Why would MBR2GPT be required to replace a 120 GB SSD with a 1 TB SSD? And if conversion to GPT was required, how does restoring an image restore eliminate the need for conversion? The image will contain an NTFS formatted system partition marked as active. If restore the image to a GPT drive, you still have the NTFS system partition which most computers will not boot in UEFI mode from. So you are still left with needing to convert a system partition to one that will boot in UEFI mode in most computers.

    If you are going to move from an MBR drive booting in legacy BIOS mode to a GPT drive booting in UEFI mode, the simple and reliable method is:
    1. Initialize the new drive as GPT. This is accomplished by:
    Code:
    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk # <- replace # with the actual number of the new drive
    clean <- this will erase the drive selected above make sure it is the new drive
    convert gpt
    select part 1
    del part override <- this will erase the MSR partition created by the convert GPT command
    create part EFI size 100 <-create a 100 MB EFI system partition
    format fs=fat32 quick
    assign letter=w
    create part MSR size=16 <-create the MSR partition after the EFI system partition
    exit
    2. Now that the new disk is prepared, copy the "C: drive" partition to it. Either:
    a. Clone the "C: drive" partition from the old drive to the new drive OR
    b. Restore the "C: drive" partition from the image backup made from the old drive

    Resize the "C: drive" partition as desired during either a. or b. above.

    3. During step 2. above, assign a drive letter to the new "C: drive" partition. Let's say letter V:. Any unused drive letter will do, this drive letter is only temporary.

    4. Put the boot files into the new EFI system partition:
    Code:
    bcdboot V:\Windows /s W: /f UEFI
    The only difference in cloning v. imaging when moving from MBR legacy booting to a new GPT drive UEFI booting is the source of the C: drive partition in step 2.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 39,969
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #24

    NavyLCDR said:
    Why would MBR2GPT be required to replace a 120 GB SSD with a 1 TB SSD?

    The OP is changing the drive to NVMe which requires BIOS UEFI.


    System Requirements for OS Installation on a PCIe* NVMe* SSD


    Code:
    System Requirements for OS Installation on a PCIe* NVMe* SSD
     
    Documentation
    
    Content Type
    Install & Setup
    
    Article ID
    000026416
    
    Last Reviewed
    04/04/2020
    
    PCIe* NVMe*-based SSDs require specific hardware, BIOS and driver support to be used as a boot device.  
    See below for some requirements for a successful installation.
    
    Basic requirements
    To use as a bootable drive, you need:
    
    PCIe NVMe storage-capable hardware motherboard support for the form factor of the SSD (i.e. PCIe, M.2, U.2). 
    Consult your system or motherboard vendor for more information
    There may be multiple connectors available, but that does not mean all of them support the NVMe standard.  
    Consult your motherboard vendor and user manual for the right connections
    M.2 form factors come in 3 different key types.  The key type (M, B, B+M) is related to the notches in the 
    M.2 card and this must be compatible with the motherboard support.  Consult your motherboard vendor 
    for more information
    System BIOS that supports UEFI 2.3.1 or later with NVMe support
    GPT drive format (See how to install OS to GPT)
    Microsoft Windows 7* or Windows® 10 operating system (OS)
    Note	Other OS supporting these requirements may function properly, but we have not validated them.
    Compatible NVMe driver available during OS installation for the drive to be detected
    For installation instructions, refer to the Intel® Solid State Drives with PCIe* NVMe* Boot Installation 
    Guidefor more information.
    
    To use as a secondary data drive, you need:
    
    PCIe NVMe storage-capable hardware motherboard support for the form factor of the SSD (i.e. PCIe, M.2, U.2). 
    Consult your system or motherboard vendor for more information
    There may be multiple connectors available, but that does not mean all of them support the NVMe standard.  
    Consult your motherboard vendor and user manual for the right connections
    M.2 form factors come in 3 different key types.  The key type (M, B, B+M) is related to the notches in the M.2 
    card and this must be compatible with the motherboard support.  Consult your motherboard vendor for more information
    System BIOS that supports UEFI 2.3.1 or later with NVMe support
    Microsoft Windows 7 or Windows 10 OS
    Note	Other OS supporting these requirements may function properly, but we have not validated them yet.
    Compatible NVMe driver installed within the OS for the drive to be detected
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #25

    zbook said:
    The OP is changing the drive to NVMe which requires BIOS UEFI.


    System Requirements for OS Installation on a PCIe* NVMe* SSD


    Code:
    System Requirements for OS Installation on a PCIe* NVMe* SSD
     
    Documentation
    
    Content Type
    Install & Setup
    
    Article ID
    000026416
    
    Last Reviewed
    04/04/2020
    
    PCIe* NVMe*-based SSDs require specific hardware, BIOS and driver support to be used as a boot device.  
    See below for some requirements for a successful installation.
    
    Basic requirements
    To use as a bootable drive, you need:
    
    PCIe NVMe storage-capable hardware motherboard support for the form factor of the SSD (i.e. PCIe, M.2, U.2). 
    Consult your system or motherboard vendor for more information
    There may be multiple connectors available, but that does not mean all of them support the NVMe standard.  
    Consult your motherboard vendor and user manual for the right connections
    M.2 form factors come in 3 different key types.  The key type (M, B, B+M) is related to the notches in the 
    M.2 card and this must be compatible with the motherboard support.  Consult your motherboard vendor 
    for more information
    System BIOS that supports UEFI 2.3.1 or later with NVMe support
    GPT drive format (See how to install OS to GPT)
    Microsoft Windows 7* or Windows® 10 operating system (OS)
    Note	Other OS supporting these requirements may function properly, but we have not validated them.
    Compatible NVMe driver available during OS installation for the drive to be detected
    For installation instructions, refer to the Intel® Solid State Drives with PCIe* NVMe* Boot Installation 
    Guidefor more information.
    
    To use as a secondary data drive, you need:
    
    PCIe NVMe storage-capable hardware motherboard support for the form factor of the SSD (i.e. PCIe, M.2, U.2). 
    Consult your system or motherboard vendor for more information
    There may be multiple connectors available, but that does not mean all of them support the NVMe standard.  
    Consult your motherboard vendor and user manual for the right connections
    M.2 form factors come in 3 different key types.  The key type (M, B, B+M) is related to the notches in the M.2 
    card and this must be compatible with the motherboard support.  Consult your motherboard vendor for more information
    System BIOS that supports UEFI 2.3.1 or later with NVMe support
    Microsoft Windows 7 or Windows 10 OS
    Note	Other OS supporting these requirements may function properly, but we have not validated them yet.
    Compatible NVMe driver installed within the OS for the drive to be detected
    So, see post #23. Why would a conversion NOT be required when restoring a disk image? If you restore a disk image from an MBR drive to a GPT drive you are going to also restore the NTFS system partition which most likely will not boot in UEFI mode.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 39,969
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #26

    Wouldn't this be easier than clone troubleshooting?
    1) Change BIOS: Legacy > UEFI
    2) Clean install Windows 20H2
    3) Restore the image on a GPT drive
    4) Use Macrium boot repair as needed (no MBR2GPT)
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #27

    zbook said:
    Wouldn't this be easier than clone troubleshooting?
    1) Change BIOS: Legacy > UEFI
    2) Clean install Windows 20H2
    3) Restore the image on a GPT drive
    4) Use Macrium boot repair as needed (no MBR2GPT)
    Not to me. But I have done it many times before. I can prepare the new disk using diskpart commands in much less time than the clean install to prepare the new disk.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 39,969
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #28

    NavyLCDR said:
    Not to me. But I have done it many times before. I can prepare the new disk using diskpart commands in much less time than the clean install to prepare the new disk.

    If the OP is willing lets do it the method you prefer.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 37
    Windows 10 Home version 2004
    Thread Starter
       #29

    Thanks for all the help and advice offered. In the end I did all my homework and since it was a Samung to Samsung cloning I opted for the Samsung Data Migration tool. Followed the way I had written it down and it all went great. Took less than 5mins to clone and after replugging my two storage HHD's and taking the 120GB Samsung drive out everything works fine.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 4,573
    Windows 10 Pro
       #30

    That is awesome news, and I`m glad nothing gave you any issues.

    I wish it went this smoothly with others that have so many problems doing such a simple thing.

    The reason I said not to use the Samsung Data Migration tool, was because when I read up on it, it said it deletes the data on the source drive, or any other partitions on the source drive, something to that affect.

    I would be very upset if it did anything at all to my source drive.

    Great job
      My Computers


 

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