Moving to a new desktop

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  1. Posts : 248
    Win 10 Pro 64
       #1

    Moving to a new desktop


    I have a 4 year old desktop with Win 10 Pro 2004 installed together with a whole collection of special programmes that I have added over the last decade using other machines. The PC is an AMD double core CPU which is not really up to the current requirements. I am thinking of getting a new PC with an Intel four core etc CPU and transferring all my files and programmes to that. Probably with an SSD instead of the current HDD.

    But I have some doubts as to exactly how to go about it.

    1. The current PC came with a Windows installation partition which started up automatically to install Win 10 Home as the OS. Accidentally, I let it install using Danish instead of English. Eventually I reconfigured it to use English as the system etc language and mostly that works. But only if I allow new versions to install through Windows Update. It won't allow 'upgrading' using a non-Danish ISO file unless I ditch my own non-MS files etc. It is a nuisance but not a problem on the current machine.
    2. But, obviously a new machine will think that Danish is required! I will try and make sure that I catch it in time and choose English from the start. But what will happen if i use AOMEI or similar to load the data from the old machine to the new?
    3. What is the best way of making the change? And is the Product Key or the Installed Key the one that I must use to set the install to Pro? (Checked via Image-Health option 11.)

    Tony
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 34,931
    Win 10 Pro (1903) (2nd PC is 21H2)
       #2

    Hi, just considering your license- it sounds as if that may be OEM, in which case it's tied to the present PC and is not transferable,

    To check you can use this:
    Determine if Windows License Type is OEM, Retail, or Volume

    Retail licenses are transferable.
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 17,266
    Windows 11 Pro
       #3

    Make a backup image of at least the C: drive partitions of both computers onto an external HDD using Macrium Reflect Free. Then restore the C: drive image of the old computer right over the top of the C: drive partition on the new computer. You will find that Windows 10 is very adapt at adjusting to new hardware. As long as both computers are running the same edition of Windows 10 (IE: Home or Pro) you will have no problems with activation.

    The only real show stopper with this method is the SATA hard drive controller modes. If both computers are set for AHCI, you should have no issues with that.

    Ooops, I see the old computer is Pro and the new computer is Windows 10 Home. This might work after the transfer of the OS from old to new computer:
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...ardware-change

    If you want to, there is even a method of copying your existing old computer Windows 10 to an external HDD and then booting the new computer from the external HDD into the copied OS to try it out. See this thread:
    Running Win 10 as a 'Live' OS from a USB stick.

    You would use an external USB HDD (or SSD) instead of a flash drive, and instead of applying an image from a Windows 10 ISO file to the NTFS partition you would copy the C: drive partition from the old computer to the external USB HDD.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 248
    Win 10 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Thanks you two! I assumed that I needed to be very careful. Those links gave me some notes to follow.
    I will make a note of the license information and let you know what I find.

    In the end I will probably spend a bit more and get a Pro install instead of the standard Home install.

    Tony
    Last edited by Snugglebugs; 21 Jul 2020 at 10:29.
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 248
    Win 10 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Well, I got the new PC by post today, 14 hours after I ordered it. Almost a record! The cats got the box and I got the rest.

    As seems to be usual these days, the quickstart guide just had drawings to show where the power plug goes, and that's all!
    Just to check - is there anything more helpful around? I would like to know what to expect when I dare to plug it in - I presume that there will be some sort of screen guidance for various options. But I would like to know in advance so I can be prepared and not end up choosing the wrong (for me) options. It is an Acer Aspire TC-886 and the label on the case states Windows 10 Home 64-bit. I will go with that for the time being.

    I will probably try changing it to Pro later as the old PC shows that it is activated for that via the digital license/MS account system. Windows Professional edition, RETAIL channel, Licensed.
    At the moment it is more important to make sure that the image is updated on the old PC. Today on that one the browser and Windows Update didn't work at all. It's less than 4 years old!

    Tony
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #6

    I've never owned an Acer, but I'd assume it isn't complicated. Connect monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Plug it in and hit the power switch and see what catches fire.

    I'd spend time thinking about whether or not to transfer the retail Pro license to the new PC. If you did that, what would you do with the old machine?

    Even if you don't transfer the Pro license, you might consider doing a clean install on the new PC so you have more control over partitioning and loaded software. I know Acers can have some unusual partitioning schemes, but it's been years since I delved into that.

    You might consider separate partitions for Windows and data. Or even installing a separate hard drive entirely for data if possible.

    I'd probably use it as it is in the factory state for a few days in case you have an earlier failure and have to return it without modifications. Familiarize yourself with it's nuances, software, speed, peculiarities, etc.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 4,573
    Windows 10 Pro
       #7

    That reminds me of Kitty, if he can`t in the box, he tears it apart
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 248
    Win 10 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #8

    Addendum - the "old" PC is a Lenovo and is very slow and nothing but trouble. I will of course try and rebuild the OS as a poor quality spare - waste not want not!

    The Win 7 PC I am back to using (to send this email etc) is a an Acer 12 years old which still supports XP programmes with several bits of Win 95/MS-DOS hardware and programmes and always works
    It just couldn't be used for Win 10

    Tony

    PS The box is big enough for all 5 cats and strong enough to resist chewing.

    - - - Updated - - -

    NavyLCDR

    I have looked through the Macrium website and the help files for AOMEI Backupper that I have had installed for years. From Backupper I have kept backup files on a regular schedule and have used it a few times to recover damaged/lost files and folders. It seems to be able to transfer (they call it Restore) all the OS settings and my files and programmes to the new machine. I have made a complete set of up to date backups and a WinPE memory stick for booting into the Restore part of AOMEI. Also, according to MS, if my MS account shows Win 10 Pro digitally licensed to me (it does) I can activate the new desktop using that.

    But I cannot find any definitive answer to the following question. Do you know it?
    Do I first install Windows on the new desktop (using the built in install files).
    Then use Macrium or Backupper to 'restore' the backups from the old desktop to the new?

    If not, then in what sequence do I do it?

    Tony
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 11,377
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #9

    Tony

    Step 1 "Do I first install Windows on the new desktop (using the built in install files)." - Just boot it up, Windows is probably already installed
    Step 2 Install Macrium / Backupper and make a system image then test that you can boot the new computer with the Macrium / Backupper boot disk
    Step 3 Back up current third-party drivers to an external drive. Backup and Restore Device Drivers - TenForumsTutorials
    Step 4 Now you can consider the question, "Then use Macrium or Backupper to 'restore' the backups from the old desktop to the new?".

    Denis
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 248
    Win 10 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Wow, aren't we having fun I'm dazzled by all the info!

    Macrium - downloaded it but very complicated process in comparison with getting Backupper. Nevertheless it is now on the PC and launches OK. I think I like the option to create a dedicated image for Windows, so I will try that and add to my collection on my Seagate Backup Plus drive.

    Very good advice about drivers. I would never have thought of that! Another folder for my collection. It will certainly save me the trouble of transferring all my old CDs to memory sticks as the new Acer comes without a built in optical drive.

    Good idea also about running the new PC "as is" for a few days. Luckily I already have a spare monitor, mouse and keyboard ready and willing. I can also try to add the new one to Mouse Without Borders to keep my worktable from an overgrown collection of HIDs.

    Tony
      My Computers


 

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