Windows 10 Will Not Boot Without Old SSD

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  1. Posts : 17
    Windows 10
       #1

    Windows 10 Will Not Boot Without Old SSD


    My OS used to be on a 960GB SSD. I upgraded the PC to a 2TB M2 SSD. I did a clean/new Windows 10 installation on that SSD. All worked fine. I finally tried to remove the old SSD and give it to my son as he is running out of space on his 500GB SSD. However, when I remove the old SSD the system won't boot. The BIOS tells me "Reboot and Select proper Boot device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key". I went into the BIOS and selected by new SSD as the boot device but that didn't help. Then I did some googling. It seems that I made the mistake of not disconnecting all the drives before installing Windows 10 so the boot sector is on the old drive. So I tried to do a

    bcdboot c:\windows /s c:
    Go to disk management and set my c partition as active.

    However, this still did not help. Actually, the C partition always said Boot. Anyways, below is a screenshot. Any help is appreciated.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Windows 10 Will Not Boot Without Old SSD-diskmanagement.png  
      My Computer

  2. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 6,040
    windows 10
       #2

    Welcome to the forum can you post the screenshot again showing all the details at the top as we need that info did you have the old drive in when you installed 10 as thats fatal as it puts boot files on the second drive
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 17
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Attached is a screenshot with the details above. I did the new installation quite a while ago so I don't recall if I disconnected the other drives. There is a good chance I didn't
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Windows 10 Will Not Boot Without Old SSD-diskmanagement2.png  
      My Computer

  4. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 10,512
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #4

    Sounds familiar, I reinstalled Win10 IP on a computer and forgot to unplug a second drive in it, Win10 noticed that but also noticed the BIOS was set for AHCI/RAID and later when I unplugged that second/D: drive it wouldn't boot, I had broken the RAID by removing that drive which was necessary to remain in the computer. Since I had nothing on the computer I simply reinstalled on the only drive/C:.
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 38,358
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #5

    Boot using a Windows 10 iso > command prompt

    Type the following commands:
    (comments will be in parenthesis)

    (A second flash drive can be used to save files or you can save to the windows 10 iso, or you can take pictures and post images into the thread.)

    Code:
    bcdedit /enum all
    bcdedit | find "osdevice"
    diskpart
    lis dis
    lis vol
    sel dis 0
    det dis
    lis par 
    sel par 1
    det par
    sel par 2
    det par
    sel par 3
    det par
    sel dis 1
    det dis
    lis par 
    sel par 1
    det par
    sel par 2
    det par
    sel par 3
    det par
    sel dis 2
    det dis
    lis par 
    sel par 1
    det par
    sel par 2
    det par
    sel par 3
    det par
    sel dis 3
    det dis
    lis par 
    sel par 1
    det par
    sel par 2
    det par
    sel par 3
    det par
    sel par 4
    det par
    sel par 5
    det par
      My Computer

  6. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 15,508
    Windows 10 Pro
       #6

    The simple solution is to open a command prompt (Admin) [run as Administrator command prompt] and run the following command:

    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C: /f BIOS

    Your current C: drive partition is already a primary partition marked as active on an MBR partitioned drive. Therefore, all you have to do is establish the correct boot files on it, which the above command will do. In your OP, you did not include the /f BIOS switch in the command.

    If that still does not work, you may need to boot from a Windows 10 installation flash drive, cd to the \Boot folder and run the bootsect command with the proper switches:

    Code:
    E:\>cd \boot
    
    E:\boot>bootsect /help
    
    bootsect {/help|/nt60|/nt52} {SYS|ALL|<DriveLetter>:} [/force] [/mbr]
    
    Boot sector restoration tool
    
    Bootsect.exe updates the master boot code for hard disk partitions in order to
    switch between BOOTMGR and NTLDR.  You can use this tool to restore the boot
    sector on your computer.
    
    /help   Displays these usage instructions.
    
    /nt52   Applies the master boot code that is compatible with NTLDR to SYS,
            ALL, or <DriveLetter>.  The operating system installed on SYS, ALL, or
            <DriveLetter> must be older than Windows Vista.
    
    /nt60   Applies the master boot code that is compatible with BOOTMGR to SYS,
            ALL, or <DriveLetter>.  The operating system installed on SYS, ALL, or
            <DriveLetter> must be Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 or later.
    
    SYS     Updates the master boot code on the system partition used to boot
            Windows.
    
    ALL     Updates the master boot code on all partitions.  ALL does not
            necessarily update the boot code for each volume.  Instead, this
            option updates the boot code on volumes that could be used as Windows
            boot volumes, which excludes any dynamic volumes that are not
            connected with an underlying disk partition.  This restriction is
            present because boot code must be located at the beginning of a disk
            partition.
    
    <DriveLetter> Updates the master boot code on the volume associated with this
            drive letter.  Boot code will not be updated if either 1)
            <DriveLetter> is not associated with a volume or 2) <DriveLetter> is
            associated with a volume not connected to an underlying disk
            partition.
    
    /force  Forcibly dismounts the volume(s) during the boot code update.  You
            should use this option with caution.
    
            If Bootsect.exe cannot gain exclusive volume access then the file
            system may overwrite the boot code before the next reboot.
            Bootsect.exe always attempts to lock and dismount the volume before
            each update.  When /force is specified, a forced dismount is attempted
            if the initial lock attempt fails.  A lock can fail, for example, if
            files on the target volume are currently opened by other programs.
    
            When successful, a forced dismount allows exclusive volume access and
            a reliable boot code update even though the initial lock failed.  At
            the same time, a forced dismount invalidates all open handles to files
            on the target volume.  This could result in unexpected behavior from
            the programs that opened these files.  Therefore, you should use this
            option with caution.
    
    /mbr    Updates the Master Boot Record without changing the partition table on
            sector 0 of the disk that contains the partition specified by SYS, ALL,
            or drive letter.  When used with /nt52 option, the master boot record
            is compatible with operating systems older than Windows Vista.  When
            used with the /nt60 option, the master boot record is compatible with
            Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 or later.
    
    Example:
    
    To apply the master boot code that is compatible with NTLDR to the volume
    labeled E:, use the following command:
    
    bootsect /nt52 E:
    
    E:\boot>
    Also, when you remove the old SSD - make sure the new SSD is moved to the top of the boot priority list in BIOS settings.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 17
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #7

    zbook said:
    Boot using a Windows 10 iso > command prompt

    Type the following commands:
    (comments will be in parenthesis)
    ...
    [/CODE]
    @zbook, I did those commands and attached the output in two attachments, one for the bcdedit and one for the diskpart. This is with windows booted up as I reconnected the SSD that I want to remove.

    - - - Updated - - -

    NavyLCDR said:
    The simple solution is to open a command prompt (Admin) [run as Administrator command prompt] and run the following command:

    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C: /f BIOS
    ...
    That did not work. I am getting the same result. As for your alternative solution, I am not sure what options to use and I don't just want to try around and then mess up the system. I guess I would need /nt60 because both the current and previous OS are newer than Vista. The drive letter I guess would just be C or am I missing something? So it would be

    bootsect /nt60 c:

    What is the worst thing that can happen if that is incorrect?

    - - - Updated - - -

    AddRAM said:
    Welcome to TenForums Mana10
    So, do you understand what happened here, and why windows doesn`t boot when you removed the Old SSD ???
    It sounds like you do in your opening paragraph so the`s good.
    Actually, I am not sure. My guess is that the boot record is on my old SSD. The Windows installer checks all the drives to see if there is a boot record somewhere. If so, it adds a new entry into that boot record for the drive onto which Windows is being installed. Then when I boot my system the BIOS goes through all the drives trying to find the boot record. I was always assuming it finds it on the drive with the newly installed OS which I have at the highest boot priority in the BIOS. But it probably doesn't find it there but on my old SSD. So when I remove it the BIOS doesn't know anymore where to load that boot record. Again, I am just guessing here. Please correct me if I am wrong. Also what is your recommended way to fix it considering the input zbook and NavyLCDR already provided?
    Windows 10 Will Not Boot Without Old SSD Attached Files
      My Computer

  8. AddRAM's Avatar
    Posts : 3,832
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       #8

    Yes you pretty much got it, the power cables on any/all other drives should be pulled when installing windows to a new drive.

    So, is the OLD SSD still installed right now ?

    Which install are you booted into right now ?

    The members above are experts at helping you to get the new drive booting, keep trying and you`ll get it fixed.

    Worst case scenario, you`ll have to do another clean install, with all other drives power cables unplugged.
    Last edited by AddRAM; 28 Mar 2020 at 22:53.
      My Computers

  9. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 15,508
    Windows 10 Pro
       #9

    What error is given when the computer tries to boot from the new SSD?
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 38,358
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #10

    1) Detach all drive cables or remove all drives except: INTEL SSDPEKNW020T8 NVMe

    2) Boot to the Windows 10 iso > command prompt

    3) type these commands:

    (comments are in parenthesis)

    bcdedit | find "osdevice"

    bootsect /nt60 W: /force /mbr

    (change the drive letter W: to the drive letter displayed in the prior command's result)

    4) reboot

    5) report results into the thread

    6) If there is failure to boot type these commands and display images into the thread:
    bootrec /fixmbr
    bootrec /fixboot
    bootrec /scanos
    bootrec /rebuildbcd
      My Computer


 
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