I'm going to be needing to clone my Win 10 SSD to a new, larger SSD.

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  1. Posts : 68
    Windows 10 Version 1909 (os build 18363. 1316)
    Thread Starter
       #11

    Winuser said:
    I've never had 100% success cloning a old drive to a new drive. Imaging a drive has always worked better for me.
    I got an image file of drive C, but how do I make the image into a bootable file on drive F?

    I dumped the image files so I can start over. I must have done something wrong.

    Acronis trial wouldn't let me do the Clone.
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  2. ignatzatsonic's Avatar
    Posts : 2,393
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #12

    chuckiechan said:
    I got an image file of drive C, but how do I make the image into a bootable file on drive F?

    I dumped the image files so I can start over. I must have done something wrong.

    Acronis trial wouldn't let me do the Clone.
    I thought you said yesterday you were going to use Macrium, not Acronis.

    At any rate: you don't "make the image into a bootable file".

    You restore the image to the destination drive. That's a formal process and will result in a bootable destination drive if it succeeds.

    You need to ensure that your image file contains ALL of the partitions necessary to restore Windows, which is likely more than just the C partition.
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  3. Posts : 68
    Windows 10 Version 1909 (os build 18363. 1316)
    Thread Starter
       #13

    I explored the idea of Acronis. I'm doing Macrium.

    Restore to the new drive. So I do need a drive in the middle?
    For example restore C to my usb back up drive, then restore that image to my new drive?

    I guess I skipped a step. Am I going the right direction here?
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  4. ignatzatsonic's Avatar
    Posts : 2,393
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #14

    chuckiechan said:
    I explored the idea of Acronis. I'm doing Macrium.

    Restore to the new drive. So I do need a drive in the middle?
    For example restore C to my usb back up drive, then restore that image to my new drive?

    I guess I skipped a step. Am I going the right direction here?
    No, you don't need a drive in the middle----other than as a temporary storage location for the image file--before restoration.

    General steps:

    Install Macrium on the old drive.

    In the Macrium interface, select the partitions on the old drive that you want to include in the image. That could be 1, 2, or more partitions. Macrium has a choice on the left side to "include all partitions necessary to restore Windows". You can choose that if you want. It would NOT include data-only partitions. You can include data partitions if you want, but that's optional.

    Walk through the interface using defaults and save that image file to some other drive, probably external. It will be one big file---with an mrimg extension.

    Install the new empty drive.

    Reboot and open Macrium and look for "restore" from the menus. Choose that mrimg file on the external drive.

    Direct the restoration to the newly installed empty drive.

    Hope it works. Success rate in the high 90 percent range.
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  5. Winuser's Avatar
    Posts : 6,977
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #15

    Basically what you want to do is make a image of the C drive and all the partitions on that drive to a folder of your choice. Then connect the new drive to your computer and restore the image to that drive . After that switch the drives and you should be good to go. If you have any problems just ask and we will be more than glad to walk you through it.
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  6. spapakons's Avatar
    Posts : 2,891
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit 202H (Nov 2020 build 19042.867)
       #16

    Let me help you with the procedure. Macrium Reflect runs inside your current Windows installation and lets you copy partitions from one drive to the other. This is convenient when you can copy all Windows partitions *the C: and all small partitions) while leaving out the not-necessary secondary partitions. Take a laptop for example. It has the C: partition with Windows, some small partitions (less than 1GB) and probably a second partition with your data and a hidden recovery partition. If you clone to a small SSD, you may not be able to fit all the partitions. Macrium lets you drag-n-drop only the C: and the small partitions and proceed. There is no point cloning the other partitions if you intend to use the old disk with USB or connect it as second disk. Acronis won't let you choose it clones the whole disk. Before you begin with either program it is a good practice to cleanup the disk first and check and fix any errors. This will reduce the amount of data to clone (increasing chances to fit the whole disk) and set the disk to "checked", error-free. If the disk is set to "dirty", not checked, Acronis and other tools try to clone bit-to-bit bypassing partition information and of course a large disk won't fit on a smaller SSD and they stop with an error.

    Assuming you have both the old and new disks connected and you have already cleanup and checked the old disk for errors.

    Using Macrium Reflect:

    Chose your current disk (the source) and click on Clone that disk. Then click the new disk (the target). If the target disk has some partitions, click on them and delete them all to leave an empty space. Now drag and drop the partitions from the source disk to the target disk with the same order they appear. If you skip the data and the recovery partitions, make sure you drag and drop any remaining partitions after C: in the order they appear. When ready start the cloning process and wait for the success message.


    Using Acronis Rescue CD:

    Start Acronis, go to Tools and select Clone Disk. Carefully select the old disk (source) and then the new disk (target). Proceed with the cloning, select proportionally when asked.

    Then shutdown the computer, remove the old disk (or set it as second, see my previous post) and you should be OK.
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  7. Winuser's Avatar
    Posts : 6,977
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #17

    The reason I recommend using the Image option instead of Clone is because the few times I tried using the Clone option in Macrium Reflect I have always had to fix the boot partition before Windows would boot. I don't know why but it never worked 100%. I have never had that problem when I used a backup image to do a restore.
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  8. Posts : 68
    Windows 10 Version 1909 (os build 18363. 1316)
    Thread Starter
       #18

    Macrium would not work for me, so my son suggested "Mini Tool Partition Free"... Clone worked like a charm.

    I have no idea of the why's and what's of why Macrium would not work for me. But again thank you all for taking the time to help me.

    Thanks again, and stay safe from Coronavirus!
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  9. Winuser's Avatar
    Posts : 6,977
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #19

    chuckiechan said:
    Macrium would not work for me, so my son suggested "Mini Tool Partition Free"... Clone worked like a charm.

    I have no idea of the why's and what's of why Macrium would not work for me. But again thank you all for taking the time to help me.

    Thanks again, and stay safe from Coronavirus!
    Glad to her that you found a solution that worked. I have the paid version of Minitool Partition Wizard and never tried the cloning option.
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  10. spapakons's Avatar
    Posts : 2,891
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit 202H (Nov 2020 build 19042.867)
       #20

    As said before, you can create Acronis Rescue CD from Acronis True Home trial. No need to buy it.
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