Questions about upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10

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  1. Posts : 18
    Windows 7 Professional
       #1

    Questions about upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10


    Well, Windows 7 is now at "End of Life" and I'm fighting with myself about upgrading. I mostly have some questions.

    1. Will my computer, a HP Compaq 6000 Pro Microtower be able to handle an upgrade to Windows 10. From what I'm hearing it should accept my product key from Windows 7, so I'm not so worried about that. I have 8 GB of memory, but in the spring, I'm planning to go up to 16 GB, which is the most my motherboard can handle, A 2 TB internal Western Digital Hard Drive, an external Seagate Backup plus (from 2014) which has all our files, and the main folders (Downloads, Documents, Music, PIctures and Videos) are pointed to the external drive for both me and my husband. I have a fairly new monitor (1366 X 768), a Core 2 Duo E8400 running at 3 GHZ. And I'm currently running Windows 7 Professional 64 bit. Oh, my BIOS is legacy. No EFI/UEFI in the Bios menu. Someone told me that it might have an issue with my video drivers, but I don't have any video cards, just the integrated graphics. What does that mean? Does that mean it won't work and I should wait till I get a new computer and let Windows 7 be unsupported or what?

    2. What are the chances of my computer being "bricked" by Windows 10 updates. How stable are the updates and how much a percentage of Windows 10 has issues with the updates, especially the November and May updates. I hear they're really huge! Will I be able to use my computer for Linux Mint next Spring(I'm getting it installed in the spring on an SSD drive)? How many people have issues and how long do these updates actually take?

    3. Will the Windows bootloader if I upgrade before installing Mint interfere at any time with the Grub 2 bootloader? Will that cause issues?

    I have the Media Creation tool, but I'm still real twitchy about upgrading. OK, scared to death. I've never upgraded a computer other than buying a new computer. Oh, I almost forgot. My computer is refurbished and working like a dream.

    If I posted in the wrong section, could someone redirect me to the right board?

    Any help would be really appreciated.
    Thank you for your time.
    Katherine "Maghdalena" Logan
    Last edited by Maghdalena; 20 Jan 2020 at 00:28. Reason: Missed some information
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 17,006
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 22H2 Build 19045.4170
       #2

    Maghdalena,

    1 Your best guidance on its ability to run Win10 will come from HP support, the HP user forums and from any TenForums users who happen to know your precise model. Search HP support & their user forum for your model.

    2 Nobody knows what % of computers have problems with any updates. Whatever it is, it is probably small. There are generally: two major updates a year ["Version updates" aka "feature updates"], one large update a month [a "Cumulative update"] & several small ones [many of which you might not even notice]. Updates can take a while but you can carry on using your computer while they install & can defer them to install when you are not using your computer. I know nothing about other OSes.

    Before trying to upgrade, make a system image so that you can get back to square one of it all goes wrong. In fact, whether you upgrade or not, make system images every so often in case your computer develops problems. Macrium Reflect Free is often recommended in this forum and there is plenty of help available here for it.
    Backup and Restore with Macrium Reflect - TenForumsTutorials
    Macrium Software Macrium Reflect Free
    Macrium USB - TenForums
    Macrium Reflect KnowledgeBase - user guide [version-independent link]
    I use Acronis TI not Macrium Reflect so I cannot provide any help for it.

    Denis
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 406
    Windows 10 21H1
       #3

    As far as I know, there can be only one bootloader and (several years ago) when I once tried to dual boot Windows and Linux, Grub took over. I haven't tried that with Windows 10, so I'm not sure how would that work. Personally, I think it's better to run each OS from it's own hard drive, with it's own bootloader, that's what I'm doing right now with Windows 7 and Windows 10.

    Following that line of thought, my choice was not to "upgrade", but to try Windows 10 on a separate drive. This way I don't need to worry about corrupting/losing my files (although it's still a good idea to have a backup). After a couple of months, I'm still running Windows 10 in a "trial mode", meaning I am not using it for work, just testing various aspects of the OS. The updates are not an issue (although that depends on your internet connection), but there are other issues that so far preventing me from completely abandoning 7 (telemetry for example, and generally the lack of control).

    Finally, although Windows 7 is no longer supported, it does not mean it will stop working or immediately become unsafe. In fact, I haven't seen anything in Windows 10 to convince me that it is safer than Windows 7 at this point. The main problem with Windows 7 - and that's why I'm bothering with Windows 10 at all - is that future hardware will not support it, so if and when I decide to get me a new PC, it won't be able to run Windows 7. My current PC works well with Windows 7 and will keep at it until I decide to replace it.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 43,180
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #4

    Hi, you have very limited support from HP for Win 8
    https://support.hp.com/gb-en/drivers...wer-pc/4023814

    but there is a 2015 BIOS so would be worth checking you have that up to date.

    One thing you could try is to boot from a Win 10 boot disk (has no effect on your internal drive and is a very useful tool) and see how that runs. No need for imaging to try that, but you should use disk imaging routinely anyway, and when you upgrade to Win 10, as soon as you can, create your first one of your next set as early as possible.

    Toolkit Item: Kyhi’s Rescue Disk – Win10.Guru
    - download the iso, then create a bootable disk from that (e.g. as per tutorial here to create bootable USB to install Win 10, but use that iso).
    - or the DIY version at the top of the Software and Apps section here.

    What are the chances of my computer being "bricked" by Windows 10 updates. How stable are the updates and how much a percentage of Windows 10 has issues with the updates,
    Updates: There are two basic approaches.
    1. Use the features in Win 10 Pro
    a. You would have Win 10 Pro, so set updates to 'Notify' in Group Policy, and none are applied unless you allow it.
    b. Defer feature updates (upgrades) for 365 days.
    2. Use a 3rd party tool to replace Windows Updates. One is given in the relevant tutorial- there are others. Home users or people whose PCs can't be upgraded beyond a given Win 10 build typically use these.

    Those methods mean you can hang back and wait for the flak to die down.

    This appears to be one on sale with Win 10 installed:
    https://www.newegg.com/hp-compaq-600...1VK-001E-0AMS7
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 31,839
    10 Home x64 (22H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #5

    Maghdalena said:
    From what I'm hearing it should accept my product key from Windows 7, so I'm not so worried about that.
    Should you try to upgrade W7 to W10 you won't be asked for a key. An activated W7 will get a digital license for W10 automatically.
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 43,180
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #6

    And you also have the option of a clean install of Win 10, using your Win 7 key. (Tutorial available).
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 18
    Windows 7 Professional
    Thread Starter
       #7

    RE: Questions about upgrading to Windows 10


    Thanks. I had heard that too.

    Katherine "Maghdalena" Logan

    - - - Updated - - -

    Bree said:
    Should you try to upgrade W7 to W10 you won't be asked for a key. An activated W7 will get a digital license for W10 automatically.
    Thanks, that's good to know. On the page with the tool, it said to give your License key, though, so that's kind of confusing at least on Microsoft's part. Is there a way to get around this or does it matter?

    Katherine "Maghdalena" Logan
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 14,055
    Win10 Pro and Home, Win11 Pro and Home, Win7, Linux Mint
       #8

    Maghdalena said:
    On the page with the tool, it said to give your License key, though, so that's kind of confusing at least on Microsoft's part. Is there a way to get around this or does it matter?
    I've done it by putting in a fake phone number for the Microsoft Account part to get the choice of a Local Account on the lower left of the screen and also choosing "I don't have a key" then work with the activation later.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 18
    Windows 7 Professional
    Thread Starter
       #9

    unifex said:
    As far as I know, there can be only one bootloader and (several years ago) when I once tried to dual boot Windows and Linux, Grub took over. I haven't tried that with Windows 10, so I'm not sure how would that work. Personally, I think it's better to run each OS from it's own hard drive, with it's own bootloader, that's what I'm doing right now with Windows 7 and Windows 10.



    Following that line of thought, my choice was not to "upgrade", but to try Windows 10 on a separate drive. This way I don't need to worry about corrupting/losing my files (although it's still a good idea to have a backup). After a couple of months, I'm still running Windows 10 in a "trial mode", meaning I am not using it for work, just testing various aspects of the OS. The updates are not an issue (although that depends on your internet connection), but there are other issues that so far preventing me from completely abandoning 7 (telemetry for example, and generally the lack of control).

    Finally, although Windows 7 is no longer supported, it does not mean it will stop working or immediately become unsafe. In fact, I haven't seen anything in Windows 10 to convince me that it is safer than Windows 7 at this point. The main problem with Windows 7 - and that's why I'm bothering with Windows 10 at all - is that future hardware will not support it, so if and when I decide to get me a new PC, it won't be able to run Windows 7. My current PC works well with Windows 7 and will keep at it until I decide to replace it.
    T

    Unifex,

    I had heard that too. I think, though I'm not savvy on computer hardware, that it's because the bootloaders won't have to fight each other, but one decides with the menu which OS you want to run. Which is why if you dual-boot, either on a single hard drive, or 2 separate hard drives, always install Windows first, because it's easier for Linux to access Windows (and NTFS) than it is for Windows to access Linux. In fact, I think it can't do that all that well. Then the Grub bootloader loads either the Linux Distro(in my case Linux Mint) or Windows, which starts up.

    I do agree on having separate hard drives, with the bootloaders on it's own hard drive, but the Grub will be able to start which OS you want without adjusting the boot order in the bios each time, or at least that's what I read. Linux is pretty flexible. Windows, not so much. I wouldn't mind trying Windows 10 in a virtual machine, but with only 8 GB of memory right now, it'd be a crawl. I tried that last year with their Enterprise, and it worked but it was S-L-O-W., which I was expecting, because despite what the books said, I wasn't expecting it to work at all! I don't think they gave the .OVA enough RAM to work with at all. Most of the programs didn't boot up because of memory issues. I'm still tempted to just stick with Windows 7, as my machine works well with it, and it can run my PrintMaster 18 for holiday cards, and that doesn't work with Windows 10 Home or Pro) I'm so tempted to just leave things, Windows-wise.

    As far as security, I heard just a day or two ago, that the NSA found a security hole in Windows 10 that was serious enough that it constituted a national security risk and basically told Microsoft, "Fix it!", so there's that. I just don't want to rush into anything.

    It seems to me that people are more likely to attack the current version of Windows, for the challenge if nothing else. It's more secure, which is all the more tempting, and as more people move from Windows 7 to Windows 10, the more people will focus on the Windows 10 and less over time, at least to Windows 7. But I could be wrong too. Still, Windows 10 has a lot going for it too. And I can always get a more current PrintMaster. It doesn't have as many templates or the same templates, but I can get images from Unsplash, or some of my royalty-free places where i have a subscription. Not as much a problem as I thought, I just don't like the idea all that much. I guess I'm attached to that program, but I could manage without it if I had to. Also, I have MS Publisher 2013 so could use that in a pinch if I had to. And I could always install it on Windows 7 in a virtual machine, assuming I can connect my DVD Drive to Virtual Box or Hyper-V in Windows 10. But I assume that means I have to get a new license for Windows 7 for activation. So the option to wait till the next computer for Windows 10 is looking real tempting. Argh!!!!

    Maghdalena

    - - - Updated - - -

    Try3 said:
    Maghdalena,

    1 Your best guidance on its ability to run Win10 will come from HP support, the HP user forums and from any TenForums users who happen to know your precise model. Search HP support & their user forum for your model.

    2 Nobody knows what % of computers have problems with any updates. Whatever it is, it is probably small. There are generally: two major updates a year ["Version updates" aka "feature updates"], one large update a month [a "Cumulative update"] & several small ones [many of which you might not even notice]. Updates can take a while but you can carry on using your computer while they install & can defer them to install when you are not using your computer. I know nothing about other OSes.

    Before trying to upgrade, make a system image so that you can get back to square one of it all goes wrong. In fact, whether you upgrade or not, make system images every so often in case your computer develops problems. Macrium Reflect Free is often recommended in this forum and there is plenty of help available here for it.
    Backup and Restore with Macrium Reflect - TenForumsTutorials
    Macrium Software Macrium Reflect Free
    Macrium USB - TenForums
    Macrium Reflect KnowledgeBase - user guide [version-independent link]
    I use Acronis TI not Macrium Reflect so I cannot provide any help for it.

    Denis
    Denis,

    Thanks. I checked with them, and they said with what I had, it looked like it would work with my system. I tried an ".OVA Enterprise evaluation, and it worked, but it was damn slow, which is what I was expecting. I wasn't really expecting to work in the first place so I was surprised.

    That the number of issues with the updates is small, helps. It looks the the number who complain about it, are in the small group that had issues was real vocal, and made it worse than it was. I have heard that Windows 10 is stable. I don't even have a set of System Recovery Disks. Meant to do it, forgot, and as usual procrastinated.

    Thanks for explaining the types of updates. It helps to know what's expected. It seems as I mentioned above, the biggest complaints are in the Version Update/Feature update category. At least I know what to expect. I think Windows 7 had the monthly/cumulative updates, and then the small ones, of course.

    From what I heard is that it looked like you couldn't do anything, that it would interrupt work, but that might be biased. Albeit it's from the LInux crowd, so as i said, biased. So it's like Windows 7 where you can do what you usually do while it's downloading and installing. OK. Good to know. I know that with Linux, you can choose when and which updates you can allow to update, including the kernel, and I think on most Distros you can choose which Kernel you want to run and or delete, but I pretty much leave that alone. I don't know all that much about Mac. I used to use it before the turn of the century, but that was a long time ago!

    OK. I've been a bad girl! I've never made a system image. I have Acronis True Image 2020 now, but I have no idea on how to do it or if I should put it on their site (I have a subscription that allows 250 GB of storage) or my external drive. I've never done that before. I'm willing to learn, however, and I would prefer to do it if I can figure out how to do it. How involved is it as my libraries are pointed to my external drive? Does the system image include that or just the Windows system? Could you help walk me through that as we have the same program?

    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks,
    "Maghdalena"

    - - - Updated - - -

    dalchina said:
    Hi, you have very limited support from HP for Win 8
    https://support.hp.com/gb-en/drivers...wer-pc/4023814

    but there is a 2015 BIOS so would be worth checking you have that up to date.

    One thing you could try is to boot from a Win 10 boot disk (has no effect on your internal drive and is a very useful tool) and see how that runs. No need for imaging to try that, but you should use disk imaging routinely anyway, and when you upgrade to Win 10, as soon as you can, create your first one of your next set as early as possible.

    Toolkit Item: Kyhi’s Rescue Disk – Win10.Guru
    - download the iso, then create a bootable disk from that (e.g. as per tutorial here to create bootable USB to install Win 10, but use that iso).
    - or the DIY version at the top of the Software and Apps section here.


    Updates: There are two basic approaches.
    1. Use the features in Win 10 Pro
    a. You would have Win 10 Pro, so set updates to 'Notify' in Group Policy, and none are applied unless you allow it.
    b. Defer feature updates (upgrades) for 365 days.
    2. Use a 3rd party tool to replace Windows Updates. One is given in the relevant tutorial- there are others. Home users or people whose PCs can't be upgraded beyond a given Win 10 build typically use these.

    Those methods mean you can hang back and wait for the flak to die down.

    This appears to be one on sale with Win 10 installed:
    https://www.newegg.com/hp-compaq-600...1VK-001E-0AMS7
    Dalchina,

    I have the older bios: 786G2 v01.09 dated: 8/25/2009. I have no idea how to update the bios. Does that mean it becomes EFI/UEFI or does it stay legacy bios? And how do you upgrade it? I've never done anything like that before and is it safe?

    I've also never done an image before either. I have Acronis True Image, but never used it. Until Recently I used iDrive, but canceled that since I had an Acronis subscription and only needed one, that and money issues(who doesn't have those these days) If any of you want to help me walk through this, I'd be happy to learn. My libraries and Downloads folder are pointed to my Seagate External Drive, so on the computer itself, there's just the OS and the Virtual Machines with Linux. (Linux Mint Mate 19.3, LInux Mint Cinnamon 19.3 and MX Linux.) I'd consider trying to put Windows 10 on a VM just to see if it still works, but can I do that with an .iso? Not real wild about the .ova. I don't think they allow enough memory for that "Enterprise Evaluation". The last time I tried it it just crawled!

    And can you get the upgrade tool without the license key or do you need to put that in or what? I'm not real clear on that? I'd like to save that for the "bare metal". I'm just real confused here how to get the .iso as I'd rather get it burned to an USB drive.

    Thanks for the ideas on updating options. Helps a lot that I have options. I didn't know I had that long for the feature updates. A Year?! Whoa that helps. At least till the bugs are worked out!

    The HP Compaq 6000 Pro with Windows 10 Pro seems to be unavailable, but that does help that it will work with my system. Makes me feel better.

    Again, any help with getting the iso so I can burn it and/or try it in the VirtualBox would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Maghdalena
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 43,180
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #10

    And can you get the upgrade tool without the license key
    - no license required.
    any help with getting the iso
    - read the article, the link is in the article. DIY version available in different thread at the top of the Software and Apps section in tenforums. The article is the older simpler to get version.

    I have the older bios: 786G2 v01.09 dated: 8/25/2009. I have no idea how to update the bios. Does that mean it becomes EFI/UEFI
    The method depends on your manufacturer; visit the download site and see the BIOS link there- hopefully there's enough info there. No, if you have legacy now, it remains that.

    And can you get the upgrade tool without the license key or do you need to put that in or what? I'm not real clear on that? I'd like to save that for the "bare metal". I'm just real confused here how to get the .iso as I'd rather get it burned to an USB drive.
    - do you mean the MS media creation tool to get an iso or bootable disk for Win 10?
    Google
    MS media creation tool

    Use the tutorial section here if you need more: searchable list for you
    Windows 10 Tutorial Index
    from which
    Download Windows 10 ISO File
    or
    Create Bootable USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 10
    Note to upgrade to Win 10 you do not need a bootable disk- and you must log in to your existing Windows to upgrade.

    You can use the bootable disk to upgrade- simply log in as usual, open it in file explorer and double click setup.exe. Booting from it can start a clean install, and it can also be useful for certain repair actions.
    Last edited by dalchina; 21 Jan 2020 at 02:23.
      My Computers


 

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