Windows 10: Query for others who use Rufus to create a bootable Win10 flash drive Solved

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  1. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
       05 Jan 2018 #71

    64-bit UEFI firmware: As long as the USB flash drive is FAT32 formatted and has \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file, it should be UEFI bootable.

    https://www.lifewire.com/efi-file-2620983
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    05 Jan 2018 #72

    Chappie said: View Post
    64-bit UEFI firmware: As long as the USB flash drive is FAT32 formatted and has \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file, it should be UEFI bootable.

    https://www.lifewire.com/efi-file-2620983
    If ive read and understood it correctly am I right in thinking that the \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file you mention will be included on the Windows 10 ISO and taken and used from the ISO or is it stored on the motherboard?

    Also in a previous conversation we had you suggested the easiest way to create a bootable Windows 10 ISO for UEFI boot only was to format the USB with FAT32 using Windows file explorer and then just Mount the Windows 10 ISO and then just select and copy all files over to the USB flash drive.
    When you've already partitioned and formatted with FAT32 the USB flash drive using Diskpart and made the drive Active then it is bootable in UEFI or Legacy BIOS mode. If you then format the drive with your suggested Format to FAT32 using windows file explorer method. How does that make it UEFI bootable only? Does the file explorer FAT32 format somehow remove the active command that was entered in Diskpart so Legacy BIOS mode is removed from the flash drive? I'm just trying to get a bit of an understanding of how things work
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    05 Jan 2018 #73

    Word Man said: View Post
    It's not totally unnecessary if it puts you more at ease. No problem reformatting - it would still boot once you re-copied the files. I'll grant that one person's "overkill" can easily be another person's "necessary". :)
    sportsfan148 said: View Post
    Would you mind explaining a little more if you don't mind? If you do a FAT32 format using Windows File Explorer you have told me it still remains bootable. So doesn't it touch any of the UEFI boot files or aren't there any UEFI boot files present on the USB flash drive until you transfer the WIndows 10 ISO files onto the USB?...
    See my highlighting within my quote above. The boot files initially there would be gone after formatting, hence the need to re-copy the files from the ISO (which includes the boot files).
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  4. Posts : 6
    Windows 10
       05 Jan 2018 #74

    The \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file exists by default in the Windows 8/10 installation media, but does not exist by default in the Windows 7 installation media.

    edit: When you boot from the USB flash drive in UEFI mode, the UEFI firmware do not use boot sectors and do not require active partition to be set. As long as the USB flash drive is FAT32 formatted and has \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file, it should be UEFI bootable.

    How to create a bootable Windows 10 USB flash drive

    - both UEFI and BIOS bootable USB

    Microsoft Media Creation Tool > select the "USB flash drive" option.

    - only UEFI bootable USB

    Open File Explorer and format USB flash drive to FAT32 file system.
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - both UEFI and BIOS bootable USB

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk #
    clean
    create partition primary
    format fs=fat32 quick
    active
    exit
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - only BIOS bootable USB

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk #
    clean
    create partition primary
    format fs=ntfs quick
    active
    exit
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - only UEFI bootable USB

    Rufus - Create bootable USB drives the easy way
    Partition scheme and target system type > GPT partition scheme for UEFI
    File system > FAT32

    - only BIOS bootable USB

    Rufus - Create bootable USB drives the easy way
    Partition scheme and target system type > MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI
    File system > NTFS
    Last edited by Chappie; 05 Jan 2018 at 10:47.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    05 Jan 2018 #75

    Chappie said: View Post
    The \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file exists by default in the Windows 8/10 installation media, but does not exist by default in the Windows 7 installation media.

    edit: When you boot from the USB flash drive in UEFI mode, the UEFI firmware do not use boot sectors and do not require active partition to be set. As long as the USB flash drive is FAT32 formatted and has \efi\boot\bootx64.efi file, it should be UEFI bootable.

    How to create a bootable Windows 10 USB flash drive

    - both UEFI and BIOS bootable USB

    Microsoft Media Creation Tool > select the "USB flash drive" option.

    - only UEFI bootable USB

    Open File Explorer and format USB flash drive to FAT32 file system.
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - both UEFI and BIOS bootable USB

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk #
    clean
    create partition primary
    format fs=fat32 quick
    active
    exit
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - only BIOS bootable USB

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk #
    clean
    create partition primary
    format fs=ntfs quick
    active
    exit
    Copy all files and folders from the mounted Windows 10 ISO file to USB flash drive.

    - only UEFI bootable USB

    Rufus - Create bootable USB drives the easy way
    Partition scheme and target system type > GPT partition scheme for UEFI
    File system > FAT32

    - only BIOS bootable USB

    Rufus - Create bootable USB drives the easy way
    Partition scheme and target system type > MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI
    File system > NTFS
    Thanks mate..you've covered all bases there. As I suspected if you format the flash drive as FAT32 in windows explorer (the flash drive was previously FAT32 ,UEFI and Legacy BIOS mode bootable before the format)...the windows explorer FAT32 format removes the active command so it is no longer bootable in Legacy BIOS mode. From then on the flash drive becomes UEFI bootable only because when you Mount the ISO, select all files and copy and paste them to the flash drive...the UEFI boot files are copied over to the flash drive at the same time as they are contained within the ISO
    Last edited by sportsfan148; 05 Jan 2018 at 13:29.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    05 Jan 2018 #76

    Word Man said: View Post
    See my highlighting within my quote above. The boot files initially there would be gone after formatting, hence the need to re-copy the files from the ISO (which includes the boot files).
    Cheers... I fully understand now. The format would remove the boot files placed on the flash drive by the previous ISO. But as soon as you Mount the newly downloaded Windows 10 ISO, select all files and Copy and Paste them on to the flash drive. The boot files are put back onto the flash drive as they are included with the new ISO. The fog is clearing lol
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    05 Jan 2018 #77

    sportsfan148 said: View Post
    ...As I suspected if you format the flash drive as FAT32 in windows explorer (the flash drive was previously FAT32 ,UEFI and Legacy BIOS mode bootable before the format)...the windows explorer FAT32 format removes the active command so it is no longer bootable in Legacy BIOS mode...
    FYI, I just now (on my Win 7 work laptop) shrunk my Windows partition by 1024 MB, created a new primary partition, quick formatted it FAT32, made it active, changed the format to NTFS (it remained active), and then changed the format back to FAT32 - it retained its active status. All done within Disk Management.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    05 Jan 2018 #78

    Word Man said: View Post
    FYI, I just now (on my Win 7 work laptop) shrunk my Windows partition by 1024 MB, created a new primary partition, quick formatted it FAT32, made it active, changed the format to NTFS (it remained active), and then changed the format back to FAT32 - it retained its active status. All done within Disk Management.
    Now youre confusing me again!!! lol Active means bootable from that partition...right. You've told me that when you format the flash drive FAT32 in Windows file explorer it makes the flash drive bootable in UEFI only so I was presuming Active status would be removed from the drive. UEFI doesn't need Active status but Legacy BIOS mode does. So if the drive remains active then it means it would be bootable still in Legacy BIOS mode when you copy over the Mounted ISO files. What am I missing? I can feel a headache coming on!! lol
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    05 Jan 2018 #79

    sportsfan148 said: View Post
    Now youre confusing me again!!! lol Active means bootable from that partition...right. I thought that when you format FAT32 in Windows file explorer it makes the flash drive bootable in UEFI only so I was presuming Active status would be removed. UEFI doesn't need Active status but Legacy BIOS mode does. So if the drive remains active then it means it would be bootable still in Legacy BIOS mode when you copy over the Mounted ISO files. What am I missing? I can feel a headache coming on!! lol
    Sorry for the confusion.

    First of all, I was about to edit my prior post: I "forgot" I had actually created that new primary partition from with diskpart (could only make logical partition in Disk Management) - so that's a technical but significant correction to what I said I did.

    Secondly, I missed the mark a bit by formatting from within Disk Manager when you spoke of formatting from within Windows/File Explorer. So, I repeated my experiment but using Windows Explorer to switch the format back and forth - still had the same result, however - no change in active status.

    My intention was only to push back a little bit on your statement that the formatting removed the active status.

    Active is necessary to be bootable in MBR/Legacy mode. Active is not required for UEFI boot. However, FAT32 is necessary for UEFI boot. NTFS or FAT32, either one, as long as active, can be booted MBR/Legacy. SO, hopefully without adding confusion, FAT32 + active is bootable either way, as long as the files needed for booting are there.

    True, if you format the partition FAT32 within File Explorer without having it active, it IS only bootable UEFI. However, if the partition was already active, formatting it FAT32 in File Explorer will NOT remove the active status and it WILL boot either way.

    Chappie wrote above that simply formatting FAT32 with File Explorer is only bootable UEFI - note, no mention of whether the partition is active or not. UEFI boot only needs FAT32 and the bootloader files.

    My whole point was simply that formatting the partition has no impact on its active status.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    05 Jan 2018 #80

    Word Man said: View Post
    Active is necessary to be bootable in MBR/Legacy mode. Active is not required for UEFI boot. However, FAT32 is necessary for UEFI boot. NTFS or FAT32, either one, as long as active, can be booted MBR/Legacy. SO, hopefully without adding confusion, FAT32 + active is bootable either way, as long as the files needed for booting are there.

    True, if you format the partition FAT32 within File Explorer without having it active, it IS only bootable UEFI. However, if the partition was already active, formatting it FAT32 in File Explorer will NOT remove the active status and it WILL boot either way.

    Chappie wrote above that simply formatting FAT32 with File Explorer is only bootable UEFI - note, no mention of whether the partition is active or not. UEFI boot only needs FAT32 and the bootloader files.

    My whole point was simply that formatting the partition has no impact on its active status.
    It sounds like Chappie was thinking that the flash drive wasn't marked as Active with Diskpart so a simple FAT32 format within windows file explorer would just boot to UEFI only . It was set up as Active..thats where my confusion began. Because it was Active it would still boot to UEFI or Legacy BIOS mode because both sets of boot files would be available after the Windows ISO was mounted and copied over to the Flash drive. It was because of that that we were getting crossed wires and confusion
      My ComputerSystem Spec


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