Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
  1.    05 Feb 2016 #21

    Hi there.

    Unless you really need to mess around with specific hardware why even bother with dual booting. Choose what OS you want to be your PRIMARY OS (i.e the one you most use) and then create the other OS as a VIRTUAL MACHINE. Easy enough to do with things like VBOX / VMWARE.

    These days the overheads of using a VM are fairly minimal so I'd leave Dual Booting unless you really have to do it.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  2. Joined : Mar 2015
    Posts : 109
    Windows 10 64-bit
       05 Feb 2016 #22

    My laptop is not so good, and I tried VM but it's just too slow
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  3. Joined : Nov 2015
    Posts : 4,766
    windows 10 Home threshold2
       05 Feb 2016 #23

    mibaup said: View Post
    My laptop is not so good, and I tried VM but it's just too slow
    Not sure what do you want with Linux.
    This may not be an option to you, and you probably knew that already......................
    You could burn the Linux to a DVD and run it as "live CD " mode. You don't even have to install it into the computer.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  4. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 55
    Windows 10/ Mac OS X/ Linux Mint
       05 Feb 2016 #24

    lx07 said: View Post
    Usually it is in Linux (and usually at /boot/efi ) but it isn't in windows.
    It is not mounted on OS X by default either.
    Just a little piece of information.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  5. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 55
    Windows 10/ Mac OS X/ Linux Mint
       05 Feb 2016 #25

    jimbo45 said: View Post
    Hi there.

    Unless you really need to mess around with specific hardware why even bother with dual booting. Choose what OS you want to be your PRIMARY OS (i.e the one you most use) and then create the other OS as a VIRTUAL MACHINE. Easy enough to do with things like VBOX / VMWARE.

    These days the overheads of using a VM are fairly minimal so I'd leave Dual Booting unless you really have to do it.

    Cheers
    jimbo
    Running an OS in a VM is ok for basic tasks but if you want to do more complicated things like running a CAD program, it is not an acceptable experience.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  6. Joined : Mar 2015
    Posts : 109
    Windows 10 64-bit
       06 Feb 2016 #26

    Since I got rEFInd to work with Windows and Ubuntu, I will be leaving it like that without removing it,
    but I will keep the
    Code:
    sudo rm -r /boot/efi/EFI/refind
    in a safe place for later
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7.    06 Feb 2016 #27

    Excellent news

    One thing to be aware of is Windows sometimes likes to take control of the boot manager.

    If you do an upgrade to a new version of Windows it may well reset the default boot manager in the firmware to be \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi (which is the Windows boot manager). This is nothing to worry about and doesn't mean anything is broken or your Linux install is lost but you'll boot straight into Windows instead of seeing the rEFInd screen at startup.

    To set it back to rEFInd you can either re-install rEFInd or (more simply) from Windows command prompt enter bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\refind\refind_x64.efi
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8.    06 Feb 2016 #28

    z31fanatic said: View Post
    Running an OS in a VM is ok for basic tasks but if you want to do more complicated things like running a CAD program, it is not an acceptable experience.
    Hi there

    I have to totally disagree here --CAD runs fine in a VM - enable hardware acceleration and 3D in the VM -- even a laptop with a decent i5 or even i3 CPU will be OK. VM's these days can run at almost 100% Native speed - especially if you have enough RAM and CPU power - and even better if you can stick the VM on an SSD.

    Some really intensive GAMING might not be suitable for a VM - although that's improving - especially if you can set a VM up to use the separate graphics GPU card directly (Pass through) .

    If the VM can't cope with your CAD it's probably because you either have very SLOW HDD's (will kill any system) or you haven't set up the VM properly.

    I run a whole slew of different types of hardware on VM's - for instance a record VINYL creating studio on an XP VM, an old HP plotting machine, an archtects blue printing machine and a dedicated 35 MM negative scanner to digitise old negatives (quite a CPU intensive application) on VM's without any problem.

    @mibaup glad you got your problem solved. Don't discount though in the future the power of using VM's. !!

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  9. Joined : Jul 2014
    San Jose, California
    Posts : 1,956
    Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64 Win10Prox64
       06 Feb 2016 #29

    lx07 said: View Post

    One thing to be aware of is Windows sometimes likes to take control of the boot manager.

    If you do an upgrade to a new version of Windows it may well reset the default boot manager in the firmware to be \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi (which is the Windows boot manager). This is nothing to worry about and doesn't mean anything is broken or your Linux install is lost but you'll boot straight into Windows instead of seeing the rEFInd screen at startup.

    To set it back to rEFInd you can either re-install rEFInd or (more simply) from Windows command prompt enter bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\refind\refind_x64.efi
    Yep, this is one of the problem which using the old legacy BIOS is more preferable so you can separate the 2 Boot Managers. If there's an update/upgrade on Windows side, will not break Linux and vice versa.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10.    06 Feb 2016 #30

    topgundcp said: View Post
    Yep, this is one of the problem which using the old legacy BIOS is more preferable so you can separate the 2 Boot Managers. If there's an update/upgrade on Windows side, will not break Linux and vice versa.
    Hi there
    That's good

    But pushing the VM thing again you can run a VM in UEFI mode even if your Host machine is BIOS only -- so ideal for testing - even on old machines. These days the "Virtual BIOS" in virtual machine software has a huge amount of flexibilty as well as options in the Virtual Machines configuration file.

    Makes it easy if you want to use the VM on different computers for example without the hassle of re-installing the OS again -- you can have the SAME VM (data disks etc) whether the HOST is Windows or Linux.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


 
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


Similar Threads
Thread Forum
Solved Reinstalling Windows 7 on 7/10 dual boot breaks dual boot
I installed the 10 tech preview along side my win 7 ultimate, I reinstalled, the Windows 7 side of the HDD because after however many years the OS had a LOT of clutter, and even though windows update was a nightmare I finally got all the updates...
Installation and Setup
Solved dual-boot Linux
I have a Lenovo laptop with Windows 10 (upgraded from Windows 8.1), and I'm considering setting it up to dual-boot Linux. I just had a look at the HD with Disk Management, and Lenovo has created 6 partitions (C, D, and 4 hidden partitions). Can I...
Installation and Setup
Solved G50-80 Win 10/Linux Dual-Boot - UEFI flash to original? Remove Ubuntu
As stated in the subject line, I am on a Lenovo G50-80 laptop w/ Windows 10 x64. I have recently been experimenting with a couple Linux OSs in a dual boot configuration with complete success. I have though since decided to dedicate another...
Installation and Setup
Solved Windows 10 + Linux dual boot advise please!
Hi All, My Windows 10 is, at the moment, running smoothly on my 500Gb SSD. I played with Linux several years ago, and would like to do it again. I would like to install a Linux distro on my old internal 250Gb SSD. What is the best way to go...
Installation and Setup
Dual Boot Windows 10 or 8.x with Linux Mint on OEM UEFI
This is my first tutorial. Any Ubuntu-based Linux distro will work on this tutorial. As of now, the current versions are: 1. Burning the Installer to a USB As stated above, any 64-bit Ubuntu-based distro will work. The current versions are: ...
Chillout Room
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 22:43.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 10 Forums