How to test color accuracy on a monitor?  

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  1. Posts : 21
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #1

    How to test color accuracy on a monitor?


    How to test color accuracy on a monitor?
    Blue is blue, red is red etc.

    I have MSI PS321QR monitor and the graphics card is a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650
    Windows 10 Pro 22H2
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  2. Posts : 305
    Windows 10
       #2

    there is plenty of tests online and there is also plenty of software solutions that do it. Just goggle around
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  3. Posts : 21
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Found some steps


    Here is a site that shows how to: How to run a monitor color test | BuddyCompany
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  4. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10
       #4

    I do the following:

    Pixel/Subpixel check which consists of simple Red, Green, Blue images the pixel dimensions of the display panel. Plus white and grey images.

    Examine the panel for each of those colours for dead pixels, subpixels.

    Visual angular check for panel technology, TN, IPS, PVA etc. That requires some knowledge of what to look for.

    LCD monitor test images

    That is useful for Gamma, Black level, White saturation.

    Some monitors download their own colour profile, and some Laptops come with colour profiles.

    Your MSI monitor "driver" is actually the Colour profile files, look for your monitor model.

    e.g. my new Laptop came with a number colour profiles which included default, sRGB, REC709, HDR.

    You can also go to Windows Colour Management > Advanced tab > Calibrate display, just search for it. That will also generate a colour profile.
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  5. Posts : 7,469
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
       #5

    If you want accurate colour reproduction e.g. for editing photos then you need to calibrate your monitor using a colorimeter e.g. Spyder.
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  6. Posts : 14,590
    Windows10
       #6

    Steve C said:
    If you want accurate colour reproduction e.g. for editing photos then you need to calibrate your monitor using a colorimeter e.g. Spyder.
    It is a shame I cannot calibrate my eyes as colour blind LOL.

    How much do any of these tools rely on individuals colour perception as even normally non colour blind person's perception varies to some degree and also depends on factors such as lighting?
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  7. Posts : 7,469
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
       #7

    cereberus said:
    It is a shame I cannot calibrate my eyes as colour blind LOL.

    How much do any of these tools rely on individuals colour perception as even normally non colour blind person's perception varies to some degree and also depends on factors such as lighting?
    It's important when calibrating a monitor to select a brightness and colour temperature which matches the viewing light. An individual should then see a very similar colour rendition.
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  8. Posts : 14,590
    Windows10
       #8

    Steve C said:
    It's important when calibrating a monitor to select a brightness and colour temperature which matches the viewing light. An individual should then see a very similar colour rendition.
    Thanks but not sure that entirely answers my question. I guess I am asking really if viewer has to do manual adjustments?

    This is only of academic interest to me as I perceive colours very differently anyway.
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  9. Posts : 202
    Windows 7
       #9

    cereberus said:
    Thanks but not sure that entirely answers my question. I guess I am asking really if viewer has to do manual adjustments?
    In the professional world, you don't actually adjust the monitor buttons. You crank the settings a certain way, and use the expensive digital colorimeter and its matching test patterns to generate a new color profile for your PC/monitor. That custom color profile is used by Windows, or Adobe apps to skew their output to match the "ideal".

    Every PC (OS/graphics card/monitor) would need its own unique profile.

    If you've purchased a Dell (or higher end) monitor, they usually toss in a calibration curve from the factory which tells you they measured it and it's not too wonky.

    Your options are "eyeball" it based on personal perception, or go the colorimeter route.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 7,469
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
       #10

    garlin said:
    In the professional world, you don't actually adjust the monitor buttons. You crank the settings a certain way, and use the expensive digital colorimeter and its matching test patterns to generate a new color profile for your PC/monitor. That custom color profile is used by Windows, or Adobe apps to skew their output to match the "ideal".

    Every PC (OS/graphics card/monitor) would need its own unique profile.

    If you've purchased a Dell (or higher end) monitor, they usually toss in a calibration curve from the factory which tells you they measured it and it's not too wonky.

    Your options are "eyeball" it based on personal perception, or go the colorimeter route.
    You do have to set the RGB controls to get the desired brightness level and approximate colour balance
      My Computers


 

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