Blower style cards

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  1. Posts : 153
    Windows 8.1 Update 1
       #1

    Blower style cards


    Hello,

    As from about 2 weeks ago my current gpu (ASUS GTX1060 6GB Founders Edition - blower style) started to artifact and after a while crash the game. It looks like it's the vram that is going bad, at the moment I can still play games by setting to 720p resolution ultra settings if I crank the fan speed up but this is not ideal and not sure how long this will be a solution for. My processor is i5 4690k 3.9ghz partnered with 12gb ddr3.

    So I need to dive into the market to buy a new card, luckily Black Friday is only a month off so I hope to get a good deal on a card.
    I have been told by a so called pc 'expert' that because I have a small case with limited airflow (EVGA Hadron Air Mini-ITX) that i need to look at getting a 'blower style' card rather than a 'open air' card. This gives me very limited chose. Currently here in Sweden I can only find 2 cards in my price range that are 'blower style'. These are;
    ASUS Turbo RTX 2060 6G
    Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 8GB
    Currently the 5700 is about 70 cheaper than the 2060 so unless the 2060 is that much better I think I'll go with the 5700 but as i said hopefully one of these cards will have a deal on Black Friday.

    Can anyone give any reviews on these cards from personal experience?
    I am a bit hung up on noise and I have read a review that says the 5700 is noisey under load. However I won't be putting either the 5700 or 2060 under load as i only want to play at 1080p ultra settings and I believe both of the cards can perform way past this.
    I also saw a review today saying that the 5700 has a problem with playing 'Fortnite' as some of the textures doesn't load correctly, not that I play fortnite but if this is a issue on this game then there must be other games with the same issues.

    Please give me your advice.
    Thanks for reading,
    James
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 25,693
    Windows 11 Pro 22621.290
       #2
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 153
    Windows 8.1 Update 1
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Is this a blower style card?
    How noisey is it?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 25,693
    Windows 11 Pro 22621.290
       #4

    jamos316 said:
    Is this a blower style card?
    How noisey is it?
    By Blower if you mean a Fan Yes. I cannot even hear the fan.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4,457
    Win 11 Pro 22000.708
       #5

    In August, I bought a Gigabyte GV-N208STURBO-8GC. That's a blower-type 2080 Super card.

    (A blower card is one with a small fan that is a "squirrel cage" blower, that draws air in one end of the card and exhausts it through the I/O end of the card, out of the case.)

    I ended up returning it because it was much too noisy under load. I was surprised, because I have owned blower cards in the past, and they weren't bad for noise. (I'm not fussy about that.)

    I replaced it with a Gigabyte GV-N208SGAMING OC-8GC. (Same GPU, 3 fans, not a blower type.) Cool and quiet.

    The main point to using blower cards is that they don't take up as much space as some of the multi-fan designs. That may be useful with some motherboards or cases, or for multi-card systems (SLI or Crossfire). Multi-fan cards still draw in air from the case and exhaust it out the back, but they don't draw air just from the rear of the card.

    If you don't need the relatively narrow format, don't buy a blower card. They may be noisier than multi-fan cards, and run hotter. Getting away from the blower format will also increase your choices, although the prices may not be lower.

    The only limitation that I see for the eVGA Hadron Air case is that the graphics card must be less than 267 mm long. As you haven't listed your mITX motherboard, I can't guess whether you have a graphics card width restriction.

    The GTX 1660ti card listed by "Josey Wales" is a Turing card like the RTX 2060, but without the ray tracing capability. The specific model is not a blower card. Online benchmarks show that the 2060 Super is a more powerful card than the 1660ti. The 1660 ti is much less expensive, though.

    Assuming that you can fit a card wider than a blower card into your case, your PC "expert" isn't that expert.
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 25,693
    Windows 11 Pro 22621.290
       #6

    bobkn said:
    In August, I bought a Gigabyte GV-N208STURBO-8GC. That's a blower-type 2080 Super card.

    (A blower card is one with a small fan that is a "squirrel cage" blower, that draws air in one end of the card and exhausts it through the I/O end of the card, out of the case.)

    I ended up returning it because it was much too noisy under load. I was surprised, because I have owned blower cards in the past, and they weren't bad for noise. (I'm not fussy about that.)

    I replaced it with a Gigabyte GV-N208SGAMING OC-8GC. (Same GPU, 3 fans, not a blower type.) Cool and quiet.

    The main point to using blower cards is that they don't take up as much space as some of the multi-fan designs. That may be useful with some motherboards or cases, or for multi-card systems (SLI or Crossfire). Multi-fan cards still draw in air from the case and exhaust it out the back, but they don't draw air just from the rear of the card.

    If you don't need the relatively narrow format, don't buy a blower card. They may be noisier than multi-fan cards, and run hotter. Getting away from the blower format will also increase your choices, although the prices may not be lower.

    The only limitation that I see for the eVGA Hadron Air case is that the graphics card must be less than 267 mm long. As you haven't listed your mITX motherboard, I can't guess whether you have a graphics card width restriction.

    The GTX 1660ti card listed by "Josey Wales" is a Turing card like the RTX 2060, but without the ray tracing capability. The specific model is not a blower card. Online benchmarks show that the 2060 Super is a more powerful card than the 1660ti. The 1660 ti is much less expensive, though.

    Assuming that you can fit a card wider than a blower card into your case, your PC "expert" isn't that expert.
    An EVGA tech told me that my GTX 1660Ti will out perform a GTX 2070. My card only has one fan and it is encased and vet quiet.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 153
    Windows 8.1 Update 1
    Thread Starter
       #7

    So are you saying that I don't need a blower card?
    If you Google the case you can see that not a lot of air flow though I have 2 fans pointing down from the top and 2 cpu fans. Where the gpu goes is very close to the power supply which may cause more heat problems.
    So if these open air cards draw in air from the case it'll be restricted right?

    Thanks for response

    - - - Updated - - -

    bobkn said:
    In August, I bought a Gigabyte GV-N208STURBO-8GC. That's a blower-type 2080 Super card.

    (A blower card is one with a small fan that is a "squirrel cage" blower, that draws air in one end of the card and exhausts it through the I/O end of the card, out of the case.)

    I ended up returning it because it was much too noisy under load. I was surprised, because I have owned blower cards in the past, and they weren't bad for noise. (I'm not fussy about that.)

    I replaced it with a Gigabyte GV-N208SGAMING OC-8GC. (Same GPU, 3 fans, not a blower type.) Cool and quiet.

    The main point to using blower cards is that they don't take up as much space as some of the multi-fan designs. That may be useful with some motherboards or cases, or for multi-card systems (SLI or Crossfire). Multi-fan cards still draw in air from the case and exhaust it out the back, but they don't draw air just from the rear of the card.

    If you don't need the relatively narrow format, don't buy a blower card. They may be noisier than multi-fan cards, and run hotter. Getting away from the blower format will also increase your choices, although the prices may not be lower.

    The only limitation that I see for the eVGA Hadron Air case is that the graphics card must be less than 267 mm long. As you haven't listed your mITX motherboard, I can't guess whether you have a graphics card width restriction.

    The GTX 1660ti card listed by "Josey Wales" is a Turing card like the RTX 2060, but without the ray tracing capability. The specific model is not a blower card. Online benchmarks show that the 2060 Super is a more powerful card than the 1660ti. The 1660 ti is much less expensive, though.

    Assuming that you can fit a card wider than a blower card into your case, your PC "expert" isn't that expert.
    So are you saying that I don't need a blower card?
    If you Google the case you can see that not a lot of air flow though I have 2 fans pointing down from the top and 2 cpu fans. Where the gpu goes is very close to the power supply which may cause more heat problems.
    So if these open air cards draw in air from the case it'll be restricted right?

    Thanks for response
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 4,457
    Win 11 Pro 22000.708
       #8

    Josey Wales said:
    An EVGA tech told me that my GTX 1660Ti will out perform a GTX 2070. My card only has one fan and it is encased and vet quiet.
    I wonder what the "eVGA tech" was referring to. There is no GTX 2070, but there is an RTX 2070.

    1660ti vs. GTX 1070:

    UserBenchmark: Nvidia GTX 1070 vs 1660-Ti

    That's pretty impressive. The aggregate score for the 1660 ti is a bit lower than the 1070, but it beats the 1070 on some of the benchmarks. The 1070 was considered a high-end card in the previous generation ("Pascal"). The 1660 ti is a midrange card.

    1660 ti vs. RTX 2060:

    UserBenchmark: Nvidia GTX 1660-Ti vs RTX 2060

    The 2060 is better than the 1660 ti everywhere, but not by much.

    1660 ti vs RTX 2070:

    UserBenchmark: Nvidia GTX 1660-Ti vs RTX 2070

    The least expensive 1660 ti is $275US at Newegg. The cheapest 2070, $490. (RTX 2070 Super, $500.) It'd be nice if nVidia undercut themselves with a $275 card that outperformed a $500 one, but it's not happening. They have almost done that, though, if comparing a 1660 ti to a GTX 1070.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 4,457
    Win 11 Pro 22000.708
       #9

    jamos316 said:
    So are you saying that I don't need a blower card?
    If you Google the case you can see that not a lot of air flow though I have 2 fans pointing down from the top and 2 cpu fans. Where the gpu goes is very close to the power supply which may cause more heat problems.
    So if these open air cards draw in air from the case it'll be restricted right?

    Thanks for response
    I don't know what you're asking.

    A blower draws air in through the end of the card , and blow it out the back. (That may not be strictly true; some air may enter from the side as well. There are definitely slots at the back of the card, though.)

    A non-blower card draws air in from the side of the card, and exhausts it out the back.

    In a tower case, the fans from a non-blower card will draw air in from below the card.

    I doubt that a blower card ever works better than one with multiple side fans.

    If you were concerned that the fans blowing air into the case couldn't keep up with the GPU fan blowing air out of the case, that problem could exist with blowers and non-blowers. (You want to maintain a slight positive air pressure in the case.) Seems very unlikely.

    If you don't have the problem with the extra width of the non-blower card, that's the way I would go.

    If you don't need the raytracing capability of the RTX 2060 (or 2060 Super, its slight update), then the GTX 1660 ti would be a great choice. It's a current generation ("Turing") card. Its performance is similar to the 2060, at a much lower price.
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 2,320
    Windows 10
       #10

    Looking at that case design suggests that it is the width of the graphics card which is all important as to airflow. There is a very restricted space for air input due to the placing of the PSU.

    The axial fan type of graphics card are around 5 mm wider than the 'centrifugal/squirrel cage/blower' type of design.

    The Centrifugal/Squirrel Cage/Blower type of fan designs have more cowling around the air flow with one small input 'hole', which basically means more restricted airflow in to the Graphics Card fan/heat sinks.

    The axial fan types be they 1/2/3 fan sort of design would have less restriction as to the input air supply 'holes'.
    That is assuming the spacing to the PSU is the same, however it would seem on average less.

    There are also shorter graphics cards which may improve the airflow.

    Thus it is swings and roundabouts as to what is the better fan arrangement.
      My Computer


 

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