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  1.    4 Weeks Ago #41
    Join Date : May 2015
    Central IL
    Posts : 4,254
    Mac OS Sierra

    Quote Originally Posted by Geneo View Post
    Because it stupidly doesn't delete the one from your previous version,
    Oh, that is nothing. When I updated mine and my son's old laptops from 8 home to 8 Pro, then 8.1. You ended up with three of those partitions. It got real fun with 10, when it deleted the wrong one when it first came out. The biggest headache that Microsoft ever created was when they pushed 10 out of the gate before it was cooked.
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  2.    4 Weeks Ago #42
    Join Date : Dec 2014
    Posts : 434
    Windows 10 Pro x64

    Quote Originally Posted by bro67 View Post
    Sorry but not rude, just stating that you are beating a dead horse and you are sweating over something that is a nothing. This has been this way since Microsoft started to change how Windows 8 going into 10 would use partitioning to keep the OS safe from user habits.
    It isn't nothing. OS disk sizes are big enough that it makes sense to split them into two partitions, one for the OS and one for other things. That way you can do an image backup of the OS of a smaller size and time. The trouble is that these recovery partitions get wedged in-between, and feature updates eat away at the OS partition size to make room for them.
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  3.    4 Weeks Ago #43
    Join Date : May 2015
    Central IL
    Posts : 4,254
    Mac OS Sierra

    Quote Originally Posted by meebers View Post
    I am trying to figure out what "reagentc /info" is telling me.
    REAgentC Command-Line Options
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  4.    4 Weeks Ago #44
    Join Date : May 2015
    Central IL
    Posts : 4,254
    Mac OS Sierra

    Quote Originally Posted by Geneo View Post
    It isn't nothing. OS disk sizes are big enough that it makes sense to split them into two partitions, one for the OS and one for other things. That way you can do an image backup of the OS of a smaller size and time. The trouble is that these recovery partitions get wedged in-between, and feature updates eat away at the OS partition size to make room for them.
    Yes it is not a anything. The size of these recovery partitions are a nothing and they are used when you have to do a repair. The only difference is that unlike Mac OS, you cannot download the OS to do a install yet at this point.
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  5.    4 Weeks Ago #45
    Join Date : Jul 2014
    San Jose, California
    Posts : 2,156
    Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64 Win10Prox64

    @Runnerbean
    May be I can elaborate a little bit more.
    There are reasons you'd get an extra Recovery partition:
    1. In Windows 8/8.1 The partition layout is:
      For GPT: 300MB Recovery, 100MB EFI System, 128MB MSR then C drive
      For MBR: 350MB System Reserved then C drive
      In Windows 10. The partition layout is:
      For GPT: 450 Recovery, 100MB E#FI System, 16MB MSR then C drive
      For MBR: 500MB System Reserved then C drive
      So when you upgrade from 8 to 10. There's not enough room for the new WinRE.wim (Basically is a WinPE with tools for troubleshooting), that's why MS create an extra Recovery at the end of C drive.
    2. Assuming that you started out with a fresh install of Windows 10 which has the correct disk layout. However, when you upgrade to the new version, the BCD (Boot Configuration Data) resides in the 100MB EFI System partiiton is partially corruped and could not find the Recovery partition so Windows create a brand new Recovery partition, set to correct GUID and put WinRe.wim in there.
    3. If you run an upgrade from the installation media (USB/DVD) by running setup.exe from it, Windows also creates an extra Recovery partition.


    Having said that, in my experience I have never run into problem with Windows upgrade via Windows Updates. Never have an extra Recovery partition created from version 1607->1703->1709.

    In Windows 10 version 1709. Once again, if you fresh install, you'll notice that the new partition layout is changed to:
    For GPT: 500MB Recovery, 100MB EFI System, 16MB MSR then C drive.
    For MBR: 550MB System Reserved then C drive.

    Over time, I have seen hundred of the same questions so you are not alone.

    It is easy to fix this problem and put it back to the way it should be so you won't have this problem with future upgrade.
    Last edited by topgundcp; 3 Weeks Ago at 20:56.
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  6.    4 Weeks Ago #46
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,418
    Windows 10 Pro

    Recovery Partitions are rather useless in Windows 10. All they contain is the advanced troubleshooting menu that you get when you hold down Shift and click on Restart. That's all it does in Windows 10. You can delete every Recovery Partition on your hard drive and you would never notice anything broken until you wanted to do a system reset, or use the advanced recovery menu to set up booting from a USB flash drive (which has never worked on any of my computers anyway) or reboot into UEFI setup. All off the functions provided by the Recovery Partition(s) are also provided by booting into a Windows 10 installation USB flash drive.

    What reagentc /info is telling you is the path to the WinRE.wim file that Windows reboots into when you enter the Advanced Recovery menu by holding down shift and clicking on restart. Delete the partition that reagent /info says the WinRE.wim file is in and you just get reduced functionality from the Advanced Recovery menu. That WinRE.wim file and a couple of very small housekeeping files like reagent.xml is all that is in the Windows 10 Recovery partition. All the system files that are used to do a Reset of Windows, in Windows 10 are contained in the WinSXS folder under Windows.

    Before Windows 10, the system files used to reset the Windows installation were actually contained in the Recovery Partition(s) which is why those partitions would be several GB in size.

    If you delete the partition that reagentc /info is pointing to, this is what you get:

    Code:
    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.16299.19]
    (c) 2017 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
    
    C:\Windows\system32>reagentc /info
    Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) and system reset configuration
    Information:
    
        Windows RE status:         Disabled
        Windows RE location:
        Boot Configuration Data (BCD) identifier: 668387ed-ad21-11e7-b98a-a264a63b44cf
        Recovery image location:
        Recovery image index:      0
        Custom image location:
        Custom image index:        0
    
    REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.
    Consequently, the posts stating "you don't have two recovery partitions" and "don't delete that first one!" are pretty much just misinformation. Now, if you delete a factory recovery partition that is several GB in size and is from Windows 8 or earlier, then you will be losing the ability to do a factory restore back to the previous OS - which was probably broken by Windows 10 anyway.
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  7.    4 Weeks Ago #47
    Join Date : May 2015
    Central IL
    Posts : 4,254
    Mac OS Sierra

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey Wales View Post
    I use legacy bios so I have no worries about which recovery partition to delete. I normally leave it alone on a new release for a few weeks and then delete it. I use MR and do a full backup daily and I do not have a large SSD.
    I am running 10 on a 120gb SSD with at least 2/3rd's unused. Really do not need to do a full backup, just a incremental of those items that may change, or before a update.
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  8.    4 Weeks Ago #48
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,418
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey Wales View Post
    I use legacy bios so I have no worries about which recovery partition to delete.
    Legacy BIOS v.UEFI has nothing to do with it.
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  9.    4 Weeks Ago #49
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 6,011
    Windows10

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Legacy BIOS v.UEFI has nothing to do with it.
    I think it might behave differently when the 4 primary partition limit is reached. I seem to remember it working slightly differently, but cannot remember off top of my head how.
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  10.    4 Weeks Ago #50
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,418
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by cereberus View Post
    I think it might behave differently when the 4 primary partition limit is reached. I seem to remember it working slightly differently, but cannot remember off top of my head how.
    But, if there is a recovery partion already existing, legacy BIOS v UEFI has no bearing on whether to delete it or not.
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