Windows 10: getting steady dose of "PC ran into a problem" screens Solved

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  1.    20 Aug 2016 #1

    getting steady dose of "PC ran into a problem" screens


    Good afternoon all,

    For the record I am running on an HP Pavilion All-In-One computer running Win 10 Home (x64) and using Edge as my default Browser.

    I really don't know where to start but here goes. On August 5 I received a Microsoft notification that the Win 10 Anniversary update was available for install.

    So I installed it and then the problems began.

    My biggest problem is I started to get Blue Screens telling me "Your PC ran into a problem and needs to restart. We're just collecting some error info, and then we'll restart for you."

    Sometimes it will restart but more often than not it just goes from 0 % to 100% and then just sits there and finally I have to click the power button to get it to shut down so I can restart it. Some of the Stop Codes have been: (1) IRQL Not Less Or Equal, (2) Critical Process Died or (3) Bad Pool Caller.

    I have run scans with Windows Defender, Super Antispyware and Malwarebytes and all three have found no malware or spyware.

    I have tried running a Command Prompt (Admin): sfc /scannow but the scans only get to 49 % and quit with the message "Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation" I have tried running it in Safe Mode too but the scan still quits around 49-53 %.

    It has become so frustrating I even tried doing a System Restore from the only one I had since the Anniversary update wiped out my previous ones. However, I couldn't get that to work either. Then I threw up my hands and decided to take the plunge and attempt a 'Reset of my PC' from the Settings page. But that didn't work either including in Safe Mode.

    Something else that has been popping up is sometimes when I click on one of my Desktop shortcuts it doesn't open but I get a screen asking me if I am sure I want to delete this shortcut?? When I click no it just comes back up again and it will do this for all my shortcuts and then just as fast as it started it ends and my Shortcuts start opening the way they are supposed too.

    Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated by my failing 74-year-old 'brain-housing group' ...lol

    Thanks and regards,
    2harts4ever
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    20 Aug 2016 #2

    Holy crap, that's some list leading to a solid dose of "reinstall windows right this moment" - or that's how I think. My dad always tells me I reinstall Windows too often. Personally I feel people are not reinstalling often enough. That's definitely what I recommend you to do. It will save you the headache. You can do a clean reinstall by downloading a boot disk from the Microsoft site, too. Make sure to read up on how to do it, exactly, if you decide to go this way, or maybe have your nephew, cousin, brother, or daughter do it for you. You can also try this, which is sort of reinstalling windows, but easier, and without losing all your files:

    Repair Install Windows 10 with an In-place Upgrade - Windows 10 Forums

    And, for your sfc issue, check this topic Solved SFC won't repair corrupt files - Error - Windows 10 Forums and see if this helps you. Refer to the post about services and putting something to manual, in particular.

    You should try these things first, honestly, because after that if all fails we're gonna need a lot more information from you. If either of these things fixes it for you, that's great.

    Also, please refer to the HP Pavilion site and update the drivers for your pc. Also update your graphic card drivers, from what I can see I don't think your BSODs are caused by your graphic card, but since they are a common cause for them, better be sure.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    20 Aug 2016 #3

    Hi, first start by establishing the integrity of your disk. Before you make any more major changes to your disk, I would suggest doing this to see if there's a problem with your file structure.

    From an admin command prompt
    [Windows key + X, click command prompt (admin)]
    chkdsk C: /F
    Your PC will need to restart.
    Make sure the result is clear or fixed.
    Post back the result, which you can get after a restart as follows:
    How do I see the results of a CHKDSK that ran on boot? - Ask Leo!

    Don't expect that to magically fix everything, but if it shows significant repairs were made, that may well be relevant. In any case I recommend doing this as a matter of routine before, say, an in-place upgrade repair install or running sfc /scannow.

    If chkdsk fails, then you would need to check the SMART parameters of your disk.

    Note: if your disk is ok, you also have the option to roll back to the previous build within 10 days of the update.



    Noted but shouldn't be directly relevant: many drivers updated 14/8/16 for this system, no BIOS update listed.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    20 Aug 2016 #4

    Hi Luulune and dalchina,

    I appreciate both of your responses. Because of my limited computer expertise I decided to try dalchina's suggestion about 'chkdsk' first.

    Here are the results:

    Log Name: Application
    Source: Microsoft-Windows-Wininit
    Date: 8/20/2016 4:06:54 PM
    Event ID: 1001
    Task Category: None
    Level: Information
    Keywords: Classic
    User: N/A
    Computer: xxxxxxxxxxxx
    Description:


    Checking file system on C:
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is Windows.


    A disk check has been scheduled.
    Windows will now check the disk.

    Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure ...
    402176 file records processed.

    File verification completed.
    4043 large file records processed.

    0 bad file records processed.


    Stage 2: Examining file name linkage ...
    489774 index entries processed.

    Index verification completed.
    0 unindexed files scanned.

    0 unindexed files recovered to lost and found.


    Stage 3: Examining security descriptors ...
    Cleaning up 773 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 773 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 773 unused security descriptors.
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    43800 data files processed.

    CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
    39490488 USN bytes processed.

    Usn Journal verification completed.

    Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
    No further action is required.

    958299135 KB total disk space.
    76232036 KB in 218394 files.
    133412 KB in 43801 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    538651 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    881395036 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    239574783 total allocation units on disk.
    220348759 allocation units available on disk.

    Internal Info:
    00 23 06 00 99 ff 03 00 23 70 07 00 00 00 00 00 .#......#p......
    6c 0d 00 00 37 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 l...7...........

    Windows has finished checking your disk.
    Please wait while your computer restarts.

    Event Xml:
    <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
    <System>
    <Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-Wininit" Guid="{206f6dea-d3c5-4d10-bc72-989f03c8b84b}" EventSourceName="Wininit" />
    <EventID Qualifiers="16384">1001</EventID>
    <Version>0</Version>
    <Level>4</Level>
    <Task>0</Task>
    <Opcode>0</Opcode>
    <Keywords>0x80000000000000</Keywords>
    <TimeCreated SystemTime="2016-08-20T20:06:54.029607600Z" />
    <EventRecordID>8442</EventRecordID>
    <Correlation />
    <Execution ProcessID="0" ThreadID="0" />
    <Channel>Application</Channel>
    <Computer>PhilandDonna</Computer>
    <Security />
    </System>
    <EventData>
    <Data>

    Checking file system on C:
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is Windows.


    A disk check has been scheduled.
    Windows will now check the disk.

    Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure ...
    402176 file records processed.

    File verification completed.
    4043 large file records processed.

    0 bad file records processed.


    Stage 2: Examining file name linkage ...
    489774 index entries processed.

    Index verification completed.
    0 unindexed files scanned.

    0 unindexed files recovered to lost and found.


    Stage 3: Examining security descriptors ...
    Cleaning up 773 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 773 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 773 unused security descriptors.
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    43800 data files processed.

    CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
    39490488 USN bytes processed.

    Usn Journal verification completed.

    Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
    No further action is required.

    958299135 KB total disk space.
    76232036 KB in 218394 files.
    133412 KB in 43801 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    538651 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    881395036 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    239574783 total allocation units on disk.
    220348759 allocation units available on disk.

    Internal Info:
    00 23 06 00 99 ff 03 00 23 70 07 00 00 00 00 00 .#......#p......
    6c 0d 00 00 37 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 l...7...........

    Windows has finished checking your disk.
    Please wait while your computer restarts.
    </Data>
    </EventData>
    </Event>

    Does anything jump out that could have caused any of my problems?

    Thanks and regards,
    2harts4ever
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    21 Aug 2016 #5

    Ok, looks like no issues with your disk as far as chkdsk is concerned. Clearly sthg went wrong with or since the upgrade resulting in some sort of significant corruption.

    You can also check the SMART parameters (e.g. Crystal Diskinfo) and run a surface test (e.g. Macrorit Diskscanner)

    Here's what I would suggest.
    1. Create a disk image of your current system (so you can always get back to where your are now, worst case).
    Everyone should use disk imaging.. Macrium Reflect (free) + its boot disk + external storage.
    Use Backup Windows, and image any data partitions separately.
    2. You can't roll back to your previous build as it's more than ten days since you upgraded.
    3. If you don't have it already, create a bootable medium for the Win 10 anniversary update (see Tutorial section if you don't know how).
    This is useful for
    - repeating the upgrade
    - in-place upgrade repair
    - as a bootable medium with some repair options
    4. Do an in-place upgrade repair install using your bootable medium.
    5. See if it works. Post back with any issues and what you've tried.
    6. If ok, create a new Macrium image of your working system - use Backup Windows
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    21 Aug 2016 #6

    Hi dalchina,

    I appreciate you hanging in here with me and all your suggestions for handling my problem. Prior to attending church this morning I did a little searching on this forum of people with similar problems after installing the Anniversary update. One in particular stood out for me.

    Everything you just suggested seems to be a little too much for my limited computer comfort zone expertise. However, on the link I am going to post someone named 'mrgeek' suggested to someone to go to a certain Microsoft page and download a 'disc image' (ISO file) that can be used to install or reinstall Win 10. His suggestion is a little more workable for the likes of my expertise. If there is any way you could go to the thread and especially check out response #7. I am under the impression after reading it that I wouldn't have to monkey with burning a disk or any other bootable media to accomplish what he is suggesting to that poster. The link is: Win10 Anniversary Update Woes

    Thanks and regards,
    2harts4ever
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    22 Aug 2016 #7

    Sure you can download and mount the iso, but if you burn it to a DVD (which is relatively easy), you then have a bootable medium you can use with some recovery options if things go wrong, as I mentioned above. This is actually useful. If you just download and mount the iso and your PC becomes unbootable, and you have no Win 10 install medium, you'd need another PC..

    You can also use the MS media creation tool to directly create a bootable USB device for Win 10.

    Disk imaging is an essential backup tool.. very strongly recommended for everyone. Why?
    - you can restore your PC to how it was even if your disk fails (and you have to buy a new one)
    - saves you reinstalling Windows (and everything else)
    - backs up your data - you can extract files from the images
    - allows you to recover an unbootable PC (hardware faults aside) without requiring technical help

    So many advantages.. (there are more).

    Re-installing Windows when things go wrong takes much longer, risks you losing data, means you have to redo settings and reinstall programs.

    Hope that helps..
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    22 Aug 2016 #8

    Morning dalchina,

    At the risk of sounding dumber than I really am could you point me to the right tutorial when you said:

    3. If you don't have it already, create a bootable medium for the Win 10 anniversary update (see Tutorial section if you don't know how).

    Thanks and regards,
    2harts4ever
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    22 Aug 2016 #9

    First go here:
    Windows 10 Tutorial Index - Windows 10 Forums
    press F3 or CTRL+F to open a search box in your browser (or however your browser searches)
    search for
    bootable
    iso
    and choose your tutorial e.g.
    USB Flash Drive - Create to Install Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums
    Windows 10 ISO Download - Windows 10 Forums

    or do a general web search for (e.g.)
    how do you create bootable "windows 10"

    Good luck!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    28 Aug 2016 #10

    UPDATE: I THINK I FOUND THE FIX

    Good morning,

    I think I might have found a solution for my problem. Early this past Tuesday (8-23) I decided to dive into my Event Viewer to see if all my unwanted shutdowns had anything in common. I discovered all had Event ID# 41, Task 63.

    After Googling this I discovered others had run into the same or a similar problem. One suggestion on fixing it pointed to changing a setting under 'Power Settings'. I did as it was suggested and I am happy to say these shutdowns have not happened since I made that change. Prior to changing the setting I was having them at least twice or sometimes three times a day.

    The solution for me was: Go to Settings > System > Power and Sleep > Additional Power Settings > Choose What the Power Settings Do > Change Settings Currently Unavailable > and then unselect "Turn on Fast Startup". Mine was checked and once I unchecked it I haven't had my shutdown problem for five days.

    I haven't seen any unusual changes in the startup of my computer by me unchecking this feature so as far as I am concerned right now my problem is solved.

    I am posting my solution just in case someone else experiencing the same problem will be helped too.

    Thanks and regards,
    2harts4ever
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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