Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
  1.    21 Feb 2016 #1
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 1,552
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)

    Pc / ups


    Not sure if should post here or chillout room as it's a bit off topic. I have a UPS attached to my desktop. As UPS are so expensive I have one that as 1400VA (700W). My PSU for the desktop is 750W but when I ordered from PC specialist they usage only added to about 500W-550W at peak even allowing for 20% (I am in UK so I think for us it's 230/240 watts for an amp). But as I am so wary about loss of power I don't actually put my monitor on the UPS for fear of exceeding it's spec. I don't want any risk of overload and unclean shutoff of power to my PC. Instead if there is a power cut I have memorised the keystrokes to shut down the PC. I just want the PC to never shutdown as a result of a power cut as I know it can create horrendous issue if your unlucky.

    It got me thinking though. My old gaming laptop never had this worry for me as it had battery backup internally. Why don't they sell desktop PCs with some kind of battery backup built in for things like power cuts? That allows a user just a few minutes to safely shut down - or even the PC detects it's moved to this small back up battery and initiates an automatic safe shut down of windows. Seems a no brainer to me, many people don't have/think about a UPS and they are ridicoulsly expensive if you need one that supports a reasonable amount of watts. Can you imagine if a new build was half way through installing and then wallop, power cut - doesn't sound a good thing at all
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    21 Feb 2016 #2

    Cant you use a program such as powerchute to do it all for you in the event of power loss? If your away from your pc when it happens it will put your pc into hibernate for you (or if your monitor shuts off for example) I think powerchute comes with certain back up systems but maybe there is something else out there that will do the same thing on yours
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    21 Feb 2016 #3
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,251
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    I have a 1500VA/900W UPS. Most of them come with software that will connect with the UPS and can be programmed to shut down on a power loss. Why not check with the manufacturer of yours and see what software they have. I believe most of them do and incorporate those features.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  4.    21 Feb 2016 #4
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 1,552
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)
    Thread Starter

    Yes it's apc, I will look into. I just didnt want to install loads of extra software unless necessary. It was more a thought that desktop PC could incorporate a small back up battery as standard.

    I wonder if very small battery powered monitors can be bought for such outages. So can just move the hdmi output from the PC into the little monitor for such events
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    21 Feb 2016 #5
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,251
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    You can find a small 200W UPS, or even smaller, for a very cheap price. I have a 27" 144Hz Gaming monitor. It's max power draw is 50W. It doesn't draw much. I can't recall seeing a battery operated monitor, but they may be available. I just think they are unnecessary. Don't let the size of your power supply concern you. No matter what size it is, it will only pull the power required by your computer. The software I mentioned can also tell you how much power you are actually pulling, which is all that matters to the UPS.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  6.    21 Feb 2016 #6
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 1,552
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)
    Thread Starter

    Ok thanks. Yes I thought about a small ups. It's very tempting. My only trouble is the room has its wall sockets in a really inconvenient place. So out of one socket I have a surge protected power strip and another basic extension strip plugged into that. None of the equipment comes anywhere near exceeding the 13A but it's the only way to get power over the other side to the desk area. So I would look to plug the ups into the second daisy chained extension strip. My other ups comes from another wall socket in the other side. A long Extension strip (no surge protection) into wall socket and the ups plugs into that and then powers the PC. This works well.

    I read online so much conflicting info but I did read surge protection ahead of a ups is not a good thing. But of course many say it's absolutely fine. Actually one I spotted online:

    APC BX500CI Back-UPS 300 Watts /500 VA,Input 230V /Output 230V, 3 x IEC Connections:Amazon.co.uk:Computers & Accessories
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    21 Feb 2016 #7
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,251
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    I would suggest you download the software and see exactly how much power you are actually pulling from the wall. I think you will be surprised at how little. I have a Graphics card that only pulls about 38 W less than yours and a 140 W CPU overclocked and have 1 27" monitor connected to the UPS as well as my Router. At this moment I am pulling 123 W from the wall. Granted, put everything under stress and it will pull more from the wall, but not as much as you would think.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  8.    21 Feb 2016 #8
    Join Date : May 2015
    Oakville
    Posts : 21
    XP/7/8.1/10 PRO 10586

    Yea, I would suggest you do like everyone says above. I have an APC 750VA model attached to my desktop PC, and I installed the software that came with it (called PowerShute) and plugged in the USB Cable into the tower so it can monitor it. I have my desktop and monitor plugged into the UPS. It lets me know if there are any spikes, ground faults, problems with the battery etc.

    For all you know without the software you could have a dead battery and not even know it and the UPC would be rendered useless in an event. You always plug in the USB cable and install the software that's what it's there for. Its also there to automate things in an event something happens. I have mine programmed to shut down the tower 5 minutes after power if not restored. So it sends the computer into shutdown, if I am here when it happens, I can close everything manually. If not, then whatever windows are open, too bad the computer shuts down, but not like I leave anything open important when I leave, maybe a browser window or a program or to that can be restored upon next boot.,
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    21 Feb 2016 #9
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 1,552
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)
    Thread Starter

    Of course you are likely to be right. I have to admit I was surprised when I was customising the PC that PC specialist said I only needed a 500 or 550 psu, I forget exactly. Given the high spec of the machine. I am not one for component upgrades to the internals but I opted for 750 psu just in case. So the ups being 700w is probably barely breaking sweat and I should look to power the monitor from it too. Again it's the positioning of those outlets at the wall that makes it all awkward. The extension chord gets the ups in range of the PC but the monitor is higher up on the desk. I need quite a long kettle lead to reach it. Therein lies another question, most kettle leads I see for use with a ups are 13A. Electrics is definetely not my strong suit but presumably I'd need to get a kettle lead with a lesser amp fuse for a monitor, for safety right? It's a shame virtually all upc are kettle connections because the power lead that comes with the monitor is kettle female at one end and a standard 3 pin uk plug at the other.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    21 Feb 2016 #10
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 1,552
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by heyyahblah View Post
    Yea, I would suggest you do like everyone says above. I have an APC 750VA model attached to my desktop PC, and I installed the software that came with it (called PowerShute) and plugged in the USB Cable into the tower so it can monitor it. I have my desktop and monitor plugged into the UPS. It lets me know if there are any spikes, ground faults, problems with the battery etc.

    For all you know without the software you could have a dead battery and not even know it and the UPC would be rendered useless in an event. You always plug in the USB cable and install the software that's what it's there for. Its also there to automate things in an event something happens. I have mine programmed to shut down the tower 5 minutes after power if not restored. So it sends the computer into shutdown, if I am here when it happens, I can close everything manually. If not, then whatever windows are open, too bad the computer shuts down, but not like I leave anything open important when I leave, maybe a browser window or a program or to that can be restored upon next boot.,
    ok good advice. I'll try and track down the original apc box to see if the software and USB cable are in there still. I tend to stray away from installing unnecessary software where possible. Especially on Windows 10 as I'm finding it quite a glitchy temperamental beast in these early days of its life. Presumably Powershute plays nice with Windows 10 with no nasty side effects
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:03.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums