Page 15 of 32 FirstFirst ... 5131415161725 ... LastLast
  1.    30 Jan 2015 #141
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 1,962
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter

    Here is a good article by Ed Boot which is useful in the context of this discussion. I have always valued Ed Bott's opinions. He is one of the few IT journalists that really knows his stuff. And he always presents a very balanced view.

    Some first impressions of Windows 10 | ZDNet

    Here are some snips that I like from what he is saying:

    The decision to shrink the icons on the taskbar from 32 pixels on each side to 24 pixels feels misguided; on high-resolution screens in particular, the icons are too small to be readily identifiable. At a minimum, I'd like an option to restore those too-small buttons to their previous size. An option to scale those icons would be even more welcome.

    Good riddance to the corner-based navigation that was the hallmark of Windows 8. I am not alone in hating the original navigation paradigm of Windows 8 (move the mouse to a corner and wait for something to appear). The Hot Corners feature in OS X is similarly annoying and one of the first things I disable on a new Mac.
    So Windows 10 replaces the charms with a notifications pane that occupies the same general space but has more value. The customizable buttons at the bottom of the pane actually allow you to do something with a single tap, unlike the charms, which just lead to the place where you get stuff done.
    Allowing the option for modern apps to run in a window, as Windows 10 does, makes a huge difference for using them in a desktop setting. The new Start menu helps, too. In fact, the whole experience of using Windows 10 on the desktop finally feels like an evolution of Windows 7 rather than a sharp left turn.
    One area that still needs work is how to allow access to settings and other app commands in modern apps. The "hamburger" menu (a stack of three horizontal lines) in the title bar feels incomplete.
    Ironically, given how much work went into building Windows 8 as a touch-first, tablet-oriented experience, Windows 10 feels most incomplete in that environment. Pendulums work that way.
    With most of the desktop work out of the way, it's time for a little more attention to those touchscreen devices over the last few months of this effort.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    30 Jan 2015 #142
    Join Date : Jan 2015
    Wesleyville
    Posts : 29
    Microsoft Windows 7/10

    The decision to shrink the icons on the taskbar from 32 pixels on each side to 24 pixels feels misguided; on high-resolution screens in particular, the icons are too small to be readily identifiable. At a minimum, I'd like an option to restore those too-small buttons to their previous size. An option to scale those icons would be even more welcome.
    Not a fan of the small icons myself, as I like to change them and thus enjoy seeing them at a decent size.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    31 Jan 2015 #143
    Join Date : Sep 2014
    Posts : 236
    7, 10TP

    That's an interesting thread to read! Here's my 2 cents ...

    Indeed, as a regular user, I don't see much new functionality in 10 (as I did not see in 8) as compared to 7. That's why I work in 7 and have 10 as a separate installation which I use simply to keep up with the new developments and I'm not really excited at what I see.

    I do not understand the argument "modern apps are the future, so just get on with the program". For my work right now I am not aware of any modern app that does something better than my desktop programs. Even if there are modern versions of those programs, I don't see any advantages in choosing them over the desktop versions. I surely won't do it simply because "it's the future".

    I also do not understand the argument "five years from now there will be new hardware which will not be supported in 7". Of course there will be. When such hardware will appear and when/if I will need that hardware, I will get the appropriate software to use it. What does it have to do with the question of whether one should/would want to "upgrade" their existing machines from 7 to 10?

    I also don't see the problem with the support cycle. It seems to me that 7 is not being dropped for the time being. It might be in 2020, but that's so far in the future that I certainly won't base any decisions I make this year on what might (or even will) happen in 2020.

    Finally, I do not understand the comparison with cars and/or other material things. Material things tend to get "used", "old", whatever words you want to use. Shiny surfaces get scratched and dull, the upholstery gets worn off and smelly, the mechanical parts get broken and need to be replaced one after another, the list goes on. Yes some people like to run their cars into the ground and some people get new cars every other year. What does this have to do with the OS? In my mind, nothing at all. Your software looks as good as your monitor/graphics card allows and that does not change over time (unless you hardware breaks down). You may get bored with it, yes, but the OS will not give you that "used" feeling as an old smelly car with worn out seats.

    In my opinion, there are basic OS functions and then there are additional bells and whistles.

    Basic functions - file management, tasks management, tasks automation, etc. - have been pretty much perfected long time ago. Most of OSs since Win2000 can do that, it's the question of doing it faster and maybe having a bit more options. I have always had the impression that 8 was a tad faster than 7 in this department, but the difference was not essential. I'm not sure about 10.

    Now, extra stuff - web browser, media features, cloud integration - that's another story altogether. Of course you expect to get more exciting features bundled with the new OS. So far with 10 this actually did not happen in my opinion, but it is indeed a preview build that keeps changing with every build and that change is not always progressive.

    So now what's left is the UI and that seems to be the center of most discussions. Well, this is of course a matter of subjective preference. I for one don't like the UI. There are plenty of issues, but it's pointless to list them since, like I said, it's subjective. Others may actually like them.

    So at the end of the day my strategy is wait and see. I will keep updating my installation of 10 in order to see what's going on, but for now my work will remain in 7. Will I "upgrade" later this year? I don't know. To me "upgrade" means getting something that works better than what I have. If that's the case with the final version of 10, then maybe I will.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    31 Jan 2015 #144
    Join Date : Jan 2015
    Posts : 391
    Windows 10

    I think one of the main purposes of Windows 8 and 10 is to move applications to a more compartmentalizes/system-agnostic form, which will allow Microsoft to rebuild the OS from scratch without dropping compatibility. Windows 8 and 10 are pretty speedy, but if it used a RTOS like Blackberry's QNX then there will be a night and day difference in performance and security. The old XP kernel predated the internet age and it's security requirements, and the NT kernel was created when we were still figuring out best security methods (and the hardware was weak enough to restrict use from using the best practices). I think one of the main reasons of 10 is to transition to the Modern development language, to reduce the number of broken applications when Microsoft starts rebuilding the OS from scratch and dropping legacy compatibility code from the core of the system.

    Plus: you do have to be careful when using the "if it ain't broke don't fix it" mantra, ESPECIALLY when Microsoft is going to make the new OS free to upgrade to. That mantra is why many people stick to XP despite being told of better OSs, and although they may be correct in saying they can mitigate XP's major problems it's still not that great for everyone.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    31 Jan 2015 #145
    Join Date : Nov 2013
    Houston
    Posts : 2,366
    3-Win-7Prox64 2-Win10Prox64

    Some peoples moto is if it ain't broke don't fix it
    Same is said about upgrades
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  6.    31 Jan 2015 #146
    Join Date : Nov 2014
    UK
    Posts : 239
    Windows 10 Pro 64bit

    Quote Originally Posted by unifex View Post
    That's an interesting thread to read! Here's my 2 cents ...

    Indeed, as a regular user, I don't see much new functionality in 10 (as I did not see in 8) as compared to 7. That's why I work in 7 and have 10 as a separate installation which I use simply to keep up with the new developments and I'm not really excited at what I see.

    I do not understand the argument "modern apps are the future, so just get on with the program". For my work right now I am not aware of any modern app that does something better than my desktop programs. Even if there are modern versions of those programs, I don't see any advantages in choosing them over the desktop versions. I surely won't do it simply because "it's the future".

    I also do not understand the argument "five years from now there will be new hardware which will not be supported in 7". Of course there will be. When such hardware will appear and when/if I will need that hardware, I will get the appropriate software to use it. What does it have to do with the question of whether one should/would want to "upgrade" their existing machines from 7 to 10?

    I also don't see the problem with the support cycle. It seems to me that 7 is not being dropped for the time being. It might be in 2020, but that's so far in the future that I certainly won't base any decisions I make this year on what might (or even will) happen in 2020.

    Finally, I do not understand the comparison with cars and/or other material things. Material things tend to get "used", "old", whatever words you want to use. Shiny surfaces get scratched and dull, the upholstery gets worn off and smelly, the mechanical parts get broken and need to be replaced one after another, the list goes on. Yes some people like to run their cars into the ground and some people get new cars every other year. What does this have to do with the OS? In my mind, nothing at all. Your software looks as good as your monitor/graphics card allows and that does not change over time (unless you hardware breaks down). You may get bored with it, yes, but the OS will not give you that "used" feeling as an old smelly car with worn out seats.

    In my opinion, there are basic OS functions and then there are additional bells and whistles.

    Basic functions - file management, tasks management, tasks automation, etc. - have been pretty much perfected long time ago. Most of OSs since Win2000 can do that, it's the question of doing it faster and maybe having a bit more options. I have always had the impression that 8 was a tad faster than 7 in this department, but the difference was not essential. I'm not sure about 10.

    Now, extra stuff - web browser, media features, cloud integration - that's another story altogether. Of course you expect to get more exciting features bundled with the new OS. So far with 10 this actually did not happen in my opinion, but it is indeed a preview build that keeps changing with every build and that change is not always progressive.

    So now what's left is the UI and that seems to be the center of most discussions. Well, this is of course a matter of subjective preference. I for one don't like the UI. There are plenty of issues, but it's pointless to list them since, like I said, it's subjective. Others may actually like them.

    So at the end of the day my strategy is wait and see. I will keep updating my installation of 10 in order to see what's going on, but for now my work will remain in 7. Will I "upgrade" later this year? I don't know. To me "upgrade" means getting something that works better than what I have. If that's the case with the final version of 10, then maybe I will.

    Well said - totally agree
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    31 Jan 2015 #147

    I've been running windows 8 and now 8.1 since day one but had to install windows 7 on a NUC because some legacy software I use unfortunately runs better (less CPU usage) in windows 7. The angst level when seeing Aero again, damn! I'd update only for the visuals.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    31 Jan 2015 #148
    Join Date : Jan 2015
    KS
    Posts : 526
    W 7 desktop Home Premium 64 - OS

    Very well said, Unifex. Thanks. We all have a choice and I don't understand why everyone wants us to be like they want us to be. I've lost my relationship with my pushy Sister because she wants me to be like her, live my life like she lives hers. Makes no sense at all.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    01 Feb 2015 #149

    Quote Originally Posted by Dude View Post
    I completely agree in a way. What i mean is everyone wants the OS how they are comfortable with it, the way it used to be back in 7 or xp so to say.

    I totally felt that way before, and did not like W8 at first. Then I used it, figured things out and like it better than 7(8.1 that is, not 8).

    My idea, which I'm sure others already had is lets have a W10, with W7 mode(remember when we had that for xp) or is that a bad idea?
    See I think what a lot of users REALLY want, and sometimes this includes me, is that there be NO changes to an OS at all. Just give us updates for the code we liked. So if you like how Windows 7 works now, just update it so it's secure enough to use.

    People in IT and "progessive" disciplines keep citing that change is good right? Really? I think humans, as in all other animals, are really creatures of habit. Nobody REALLY likes change at all. The only ones that do are those that belong to corporations, because of greed and the ever-growing want for insane profit levels. Those of us who just want to go about our lives want familiarity.

    As an example, I'm a big vinyl LP fanatic. You know what I like about turntables? They can play a mono LP from Duane Eddy made in 1956, and use the exact same stylus/cartridge assembly to play that Adele LP I purchased last year. How about that? Something that is effective and can do so by staying EXACTLY the same for 50 years.

    Why should I feel obsolete if my computer does EXACTLY what I want ten years after the fact, and I can do it with the classic desktop for example? So what if it looks like 1999? UI "Innovations" such as the Ribbon, or Metro (er, Modern) although they have attracted fans were indeed solutions to a problem that didn't exist.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    01 Feb 2015 #150
    Join Date : Jan 2014
    Oak Ridge TN, USA
    Posts : 24,523
    Windows 10 Pro x64

    Greed?? I can't agree with that. But, I don't want to get into a discussion about that subject here. I think that change is a good thing and people can adapt to it. We've been doing that for ages and will for a very long time to come. Some changes are bad but not all of them and making blank statements is silly, IMO.

    I used to dig LP's but I really love CD's. The sound is better and they don't have the dust issues and static that LP's have.

    Jeff
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
Page 15 of 32 FirstFirst ... 5131415161725 ... LastLast


Similar Threads
Thread Forum
Customization Change Event Sounds in Windows 10
How to Change your Event Sounds in Windows 10 A sound theme is a set of sounds applied to events in Windows and apps. You can have Windows play a sound when certain events occur on your PC. (An event can be an action that you perform, such as...
Tutorials
Customization Change Theme in Windows 10
How to Change the Theme in Windows 10 In Windows, you can use themes to help make your desktop feel a little more personal. Themes change the desktop background, colors, sounds, screen saver, and pointers on your PC all at once, and you can...
Tutorials
General Tips Change Time in Windows 10
How to Change the Time in Windows 10 Your PC's system clock is used to record the time whenever you create or modify files on your PC. You can change the clock's time and time zone. Time is a measure in which events can be ordered from the...
Tutorials
Security System Change Windows SmartScreen Settings in Windows 10
Windows SmartScreen helps keep your PC safe by checking downloaded files and web content within apps to help protect you from malicious software and potentially unsafe web content. Before an unknown or potentially unsafe downloaded file is opened,...
Tutorials
General Tips Change Date in Windows 10
How to Change the Date in Windows 10 A calendar date is a reference to a particular day represented within a calendar system. The calendar date allows the specific day to be identified. This tutorial will show you different ways on how to...
Tutorials
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 19:06.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums