Windows 10: Help with new SSD Solved

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  1.    07 Jan 2016 #1

    Help with new SSD


    I currently had 256GB SSD in my PC and that was getting full so I bought a Samsung 1TB SSD to put in my PC to use as the primary hard drive. I don't want to lose all my data so I chose to use the Samsung software to migrate all of the data from the 256GB onto the new 1TB. I then restarted and went into the boot menu to change it around so the new SSD booted first before the 256GB and everything loaded fine until I went into my computer and realised it has many drives listed. I went into disk management and it currently list like this

    Disk 0 (238.47gb) - system reserved (D) 350mb NTFS Healthy (Active, Primary, Partition) - (F) 237.69gb NTFS Healthy (Primary Partition) - 450mb Healthy (Recovery Partition)

    Disk 1 (931.51gb) 100mb NTFS Healthy (System, Active, Primary, Partition) - (C) 931.42gb NTFS Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)


    What I wanted to know is can I now delete everything off my original drive which is disk 0? Will it stop me using my new SSD which is disk 1? I'm not really a computer tech person so I wouldn't usually delete things but I don't like the way it is mapped in "my computer" which lists the partitions, I was hoping to use the old SSD as storage so would prefer it wiped clean. I also noticed the recovery partition is on my old SSD but is not on my new SSD should it have copied over or is this normal?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    07 Jan 2016 #2

    Best thing to do to double check would be to pull the smaller SSD out of the system and see if your computer boots fine etc... If it does then yes wipe the drive.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 20,824
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       07 Jan 2016 #3

    Check out this tutorial at Seven Forums to destroy the partitions on your 256Gb SSD, after that go to Disk Management and format it to NTFS, then you can set up ne partitions if you so wish.
    Disk - Clean and Clean All with Diskpart Command - Windows 7 Help Forums
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  4.    07 Jan 2016 #4

    The reason your old drive is listed as drive 0 and the new drive 1 is because you have the old drive plugged into a lower number SATA port than the new one.
    You should create a recovery drive for your new configuration per these instructions from Microsoft. I would then reformat your old drive for full use as you want.

    Create a recovery drive


    A recovery drive can help you troubleshoot and fix problems with your PC, even if it wonít start. To create one, all you need is a USB drive.

    • From the taskbar, search for Create a recovery drive and then select it. You might be asked to enter an admin password or confirm your choice.
    • When the tool opens, make sure Back up system files to the recovery drive is selected and then select Next.
    • Connect a USB drive to your PC, select it, and then select Next > Create. A lot of files need to be copied to the recovery drive, so this might take a while.
    • When itís done, you might see a Delete the recovery partition from your PC link on the final screen. If you want to free up drive space on your PC, select the link and then select Delete. If not, select Finish.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    07 Jan 2016 #5

    Thanks for the replies guys much appreciated, I have disconnected my old SSD and everything loads up fine with only the new SSD which means I can wipe everything on the old drive right? The only concern I have is deleting the recovery partition on the old drive, is there no way to transfer that over to the new SSD? I don't have a USB drive. Do I really need it on my new SSD, is it essential? Thanks
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 2,424
    Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64 Win10Prox64
       07 Jan 2016 #6

    I am not really sure why you would want a 1TB drive to contain your Windows OS and data together. Normally, you would want your Windows OS drive to be small so that it will be easier to maintain/backup/restore and put your personal data to the larger drive.

    In addition, C drive is usually the target for virus attack and if it becomes unbootable/broken then there's goes your data.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    07 Jan 2016 #7

    topgundcp said: View Post
    I am not really sure why you would want a 1TB drive to contain your Windows OS and data together. Normally, you would want your Windows OS drive to be small so that it will be easier to maintain/backup/restore and put your personal data to the larger drive.

    In addition, C drive is usually the target for virus attack and if it becomes unbootable/broken then there's goes your data.
    That's ok we all have our own preferences.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    07 Jan 2016 #8

    danny84 said: View Post
    The only concern I have is deleting the recovery partition on the old drive, is there no way to transfer that over to the new SSD? I don't have a USB drive. Do I really need it on my new SSD, is it essential? Thanks
    When you say you don't have a USB drive - do you mean you don't have a USB flash drive (aka memory stick, aka thumb drive) or you don't have a USB slot for one? If you have a USB slot, it is fairly important to have a Windows 10 recovery USB flash drive to fix your PC if something makes it unbootable. You only need an 8gb flash drive which is really cheap insurance. It looks like your recovery partition is probably the generic recovery created by Windows 10 during a clean install of Windows 10, so with a confirmed working recovery USB flash drive there would be little reason to keep the partition.

    If you want to move the recovery partition to the new SSD, you can use MiniTool Partition Wizard Free to both make the space on the SSD for it and to copy it to the created empty space. For it to be operable, you will have to use the correct reagentc.exe command to point Windows 10 to the new location.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    07 Jan 2016 #9

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    When you say you don't have a USB drive - do you mean you don't have a USB flash drive (aka memory stick, aka thumb drive) or you don't have a USB slot for one? If you have a USB slot, it is fairly important to have a Windows 10 recovery USB flash drive to fix your PC if something makes it unbootable. You only need an 8gb flash drive which is really cheap insurance. It looks like your recovery partition is probably the generic recovery created by Windows 10 during a clean install of Windows 10, so with a confirmed working recovery USB flash drive there would be little reason to keep the partition.

    If you want to move the recovery partition to the new SSD, you can use MiniTool Partition Wizard Free to both make the space on the SSD for it and to copy it to the created empty space. For it to be operable, you will have to use the correct reagentc.exe command to point Windows 10 to the new location.
    Yes I meant I don't have a memory stick, I have usb slots sorry for the confusion. I will check out those memory sticks then and move it onto that and then just wipe everything off the old ssd if that is easier. Thanks for the reply.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  •    07 Jan 2016 #10

    D3LL said: View Post
    Best thing to do to double check would be to pull the smaller SSD out of the system and see if your computer boots fine etc... If it does then yes wipe the drive.
    I've done this exact procedure and it worked perfectly.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


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