Cannot import edited Registry hive

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  1. Posts : 418
    Win10 32bit v20H2
    Thread Starter
       #11

    The Slave drive is NOT 'data' - it is a clone of the system drive whose registry resists editing. That is why it was made a slave for access to the registry while it is not in use.

    I am still confused about the two names I have been required to allocate, but I can now see a way out. Having edited the hive, I now have a .reg file, that I can copy to the slave drive; I can then boot the drive that was a slave, but is now a system drive, I can right-click the .reg file, choose As Administrator, and run it - that should now replace the registry parts I could not edit before. I think I am almost there.....
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 23,777
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4651 (x64) [22H2]
       #12

    Sebastian42 said:
    The Slave drive is NOT 'data' - it is a clone of the system drive whose registry resists editing. That is why it was made a slave for access to the registry while it is not in use.

    I am still confused about the two names I have been required to allocate, but I can now see a way out. Having edited the hive, I now have a .reg file, that I can copy to the slave drive; I can then boot the drive that was a slave, but is now a system drive, I can right-click the .reg file, choose As Administrator, and run it - that should now replace the registry parts I could not edit before. I think I am almost there.....


    IF... you're trying to edit registry entries that won't allow you to edit them... changing the .reg file to .txt will allow the edit, but then when you try to import... it will fail.
    For some registry keys, the only way to edit them is to Take Ownership.
    Changing a reg file to txt is NOT a workable shortcut, to avoid the hassle of taking ownership.


    If this is not what you're trying to do, then disregard this post.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 418
    Win10 32bit v20H2
    Thread Starter
       #13

    It is very much what I want to do.

    I had tried to change the permissions for the entries that resist deletion, but that did not work. That is why I wanted to access the registry when it was a slave.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 844
    Windows 7
       #14

    Download PowerRun, which allows you open a CMD shell as the TrustedInstaller identity. Now you can launch regedit, or run any reg commands without worrying about permissions. Keep in mind, the protections exist to protect key system values from inadvertent tampering.

    Don't do the Take Ownership path, it's more likely to end up creating a new problem if you're mistake prone.

    And always back up your system first.
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  5. Posts : 418
    Win10 32bit v20H2
    Thread Starter
       #15

    Since I am working with a clone of my system, I do not need to worry about anything going wrong. I always have the original system to return to. Only when success has been proved, would I make a change to the system drive.

    If I understand correctly, under PowerRun, I should be able to do the deletions that I am currently prevented, and so don't need to worry about hives and renaming....
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 23,777
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4651 (x64) [22H2]
       #16

    Sebastian42 said:
    It is very much what I want to do.

    I had tried to change the permissions for the entries that resist deletion, but that did not work. That is why I wanted to access the registry when it was a slave.



    The problem with that theory is that when you try to import it back into the non-slave registry, the registry will know you are trying a workaround.
    You must go the Trusted Installer route to edit certain keys.
    @garlin 's suggestion is a workabale workaround, because it does temporarily make you the Trusted Installer during the edit.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 418
    Win10 32bit v20H2
    Thread Starter
       #17

    Indeed - am dying to try PowerRun, but have other priorities right now.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 23,777
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4651 (x64) [22H2]
       #18

    Sebastian42 said:
    Indeed - am dying to try PowerRun, but have other priorities right now.



    Have to give you credit for thinking outside the box.
    You "almost" found a workaround.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 844
    Windows 7
       #19

    PowerRun is most helpful, because many users don't restore the original reg key or file ownership when they're finished. This opens up a major security issue -- if you grant yourself permanent access, then anything you run can now modify it without asking for permission.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 418
    Win10 32bit v20H2
    Thread Starter
       #20

    I am puzzled whether this constitutes a caution against using PowerRun, or the opposite...
      My Computer


 

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