books, online courses and tools to learn


  1. Posts : 46
    Windows 10 23H2
       #1

    books, online courses and tools to learn


    Does anyone have any advice to learn troubleshoot Windows? I trying to read the Troubleshoot Series from Microsoft's MVP Mike Halsey. I think he doesn't go as deep as he should be, since his books is made for technicians.

    I need more details about how to solve common Windows problemas (maybe startups issues, hardwares failures, making sense of Event Viewer, malware and threats removal, slow performance, etc)

    You can recommend me any books, online courses and third party software which kinda give a shortcut to solve Windows problems.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 23,646
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4529 (x64) [22H2]
       #2

    Lokateu said:
    Does anyone have any advice to learn troubleshoot Windows? I trying to read the Troubleshoot Series from Microsoft's MVP Mike Halsey. I think he doesn't go as deep as he should be, since his books is made for technicians.

    I need more details about how to solve common Windows problemas (maybe startups issues, hardwares failures, making sense of Event Viewer, malware and threats removal, slow performance, etc)

    You can recommend me any books, online courses and third party software which kinda give a shortcut to solve Windows problems.


    Probably the easiest way... is to just read these forums.
    Windows isn't that complicated. You'll notice there are various methods to employ, when troubleshooting a problem.

    There's no real quick answer to this kind of question. There's no book out there, that has all the answers.
    On top of all that... things change as fast as you learn them.

    If you're just worried about troubleshooting your own computer(s)... I think preventative maintenance is far more useful than fixing problems, after the fact. Set your computer(s) up, so they don't "have" problems.
    1. After a fresh install, start using backup software religiously.
    2. There are very few software problems that restoring from a backup, can't fix.
    3. For hardware issues... build a stable computer, and don't try to push it to go faster, etc.
    4. Most compatible hardware these days, will work fine for years, if you just run things at the speed they were designed to run at.
    5. Spend time researching the parts you will use in your builds, or the types of computing devices that are available.

    There used to be really good books on a site called Annoyances.org, but they seem to have died out after Windows 7.

    There's plenty of online course, but they generally tend to focus on one area, rather than the whole shooting match.
    By the time you get 5-7 courses under your belt, to where you start to see the big picture... the courses you learned in the beginning are going out of date.

    In the US I would say, go work for Geek Squad for a while, to get some overall experience.

    There are also, many different ways to fix things. You can troubleshoot down to the actual problem, or do things like just start over with a clean install.
    For hardware troubleshooting... the easiest way is to swap out parts, that you think might be bad. But that requires having a lot of parts sitting around, which isn't cheap.

    Spend some free time, just reading these forums, especially the issues that are marked Solved.
    It's a lot to take in at first, but you'll slowly become more familiar with the different ways of troubleshooting various types of problems.

    The many, many tutorials are another good place to spend some time. 99% of the tutorials are tested and working solutions for all kinds of problems. Every now and then you'll find one that's out of date, but those are very few, and usually get updated rapidly anyway.



    Probably the most common cause of software or hardware problems is "lack of patience".
    People rush through installing Windows and their software. Or people rush through coming up with the components to use in a build.
    Just slowing down, and taking your time and planning ahead will solve most problems before they occur.




    When you first come to one of these forums, they ARE very scary looking. But in a month or two, you'll start to get a feel for them. That's when they become very, very useful. Again... it's that ugly word... patience.


    But we have a cure for that too...

    books, online courses and tools to learn-patience.png
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 46
    Windows 10 23H2
    Thread Starter
       #3

    I really spend some time in this forum to learn from others... I worked as a technician dealing with Windows problems almost everyday. Somethings I didn't even know that exists. I became pretty good as hardware diagnosis at the eletronic level, but Windows seems to have more thing to know.

    Set your computer(s) up, so they don't "have" problems.
    that's a excelent advice, but how exactly I do that? I mean, having a backup plan that only saves your data does nothing to prevent Windows to sudenly not boot anymore. Any tips on how to get around that?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 23,646
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4529 (x64) [22H2]
       #4

    A lot of the people on these forums are older, and have been doing these kinds of things for 30, 40, 50 years.

    Which age category do you fall in?

    A lot of people have also worked in the computer field, for years. Many have grown up with computers, since our teenager days. This isn't something you will learn in one semester. It definitely takes a while.

    But, the good part is that computers are here to stay... so everything you learn will come in handy sooner or later.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 23,646
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4529 (x64) [22H2]
       #5

    Lokateu said:
    I really spend some time in this forum to learn from others... I worked as a technician dealing with Windows problems almost everyday. Somethings I didn't even know that exists. I became pretty good as hardware diagnosis at the eletronic level, but Windows seems to have more thing to know.


    that's a excelent advice, but how exactly I do that? I mean, having a backup plan that only saves your data does nothing to prevent Windows to sudenly not boot anymore. Any tips on how to get around that?



    Most 3rd party backup software these days, allows you to make a USB stick with a bootable version of the backup software.
    This allows you to boot to the backup software, and access your backups, even when Windows won't boot.

    For example... here are two commonly used 3rd party backup programs...

    Macrium Reflect and AOMEI Backupper - GUIDES | Windows 11 Forum

    Folks new to backup software, should probably start with AOMEI Backupper Standard. It's free and a bit easier.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 1,298
    Windows 10
       #6

    Some good info in here but just to add.. i am not familiar with that PDF but i would assume that he is mainly just talking about more key concepts rather than defining abstract examples which is what you sound more inclined to.

    Microsoft learn - you can find just about anything you need to know on here, not always the case but for most things it has the info you need.

    Wikipedia - Also a good source for understanding something in detail.

    White papers - a lot of concepts as to reasons why they do things, and also can be more in depth say you find a white paper for networking on NT for example, which will go in depth all about networking and is from the persons narrative of learning themself.

    Windows NT learn the basis of what the OS actually is and work from there.

    The book you have is probably good reference point but you would need to spend time looking at key areas you want to learn in more detail by reading that book and then researching.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 46
    Windows 10 23H2
    Thread Starter
       #7

    Malneb said:
    Some good info in here but just to add.. i am not familiar with that PDF but i would assume that he is mainly just talking about more key concepts rather than defining abstract examples which is what you sound more inclined to.

    Microsoft learn - you can find just about anything you need to know on here, not always the case but for most things it has the info you need.

    Wikipedia - Also a good source for understanding something in detail.

    White papers - a lot of concepts as to reasons why they do things, and also can be more in depth say you find a white paper for networking on NT for example, which will go in depth all about networking and is from the persons narrative of learning themself.

    Windows NT learn the basis of what the OS actually is and work from there.

    The book you have is probably good reference point but you would need to spend time looking at key areas you want to learn in more detail by reading that book and then researching.
    I think it's a great book, but not for what I'm trying to learn. It sure have key concepts and teach where to look to solve the problem. I just need one step further in the troubleshoot Windows direction.

    Right now I worked troubleshooting Windows problems, so I think I should be learning tools that helps me to overcome those problems.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 1,800
    Windows 10 Pro
       #8

    Ghot said:
    Probably the easiest way... is to just read these forums.
    Windows isn't that complicated. You'll notice there are various methods to employ, when troubleshooting a problem.

    There's no real quick answer to this kind of question. There's no book out there, that has all the answers.
    On top of all that... things change as fast as you learn them.

    If you're just worried about troubleshooting your own computer(s)... I think preventative maintenance is far more useful than fixing problems, after the fact. Set your computer(s) up, so they don't "have" problems.
    1. After a fresh install, start using backup software religiously.
    2. There are very few software problems that restoring from a backup, can't fix.
    3. For hardware issues... build a stable computer, and don't try to push it to go faster, etc.
    4. Most compatible hardware these days, will work fine for years, if you just run things at the speed they were designed to run at.
    5. Spend time researching the parts you will use in your builds, or the types of computing devices that are available.

    There used to be really good books on a site called Annoyances.org, but they seem to have died out after Windows 7.

    There's plenty of online course, but they generally tend to focus on one area, rather than the whole shooting match.
    By the time you get 5-7 courses under your belt, to where you start to see the big picture... the courses you learned in the beginning are going out of date.

    In the US I would say, go work for Geek Squad for a while, to get some overall experience.

    There are also, many different ways to fix things. You can troubleshoot down to the actual problem, or do things like just start over with a clean install.
    For hardware troubleshooting... the easiest way is to swap out parts, that you think might be bad. But that requires having a lot of parts sitting around, which isn't cheap.

    Spend some free time, just reading these forums, especially the issues that are marked Solved.
    It's a lot to take in at first, but you'll slowly become more familiar with the different ways of troubleshooting various types of problems.

    The many, many tutorials are another good place to spend some time. 99% of the tutorials are tested and working solutions for all kinds of problems. Every now and then you'll find one that's out of date, but those are very few, and usually get updated rapidly anyway.



    Probably the most common cause of software or hardware problems is "lack of patience".
    People rush through installing Windows and their software. Or people rush through coming up with the components to use in a build.
    Just slowing down, and taking your time and planning ahead will solve most problems before they occur.


    When you first come to one of these forums, they ARE very scary looking. But in a month or two, you'll start to get a feel for them. That's when they become very, very useful. Again... it's that ugly word... patience.
    A lot of wisdom here in @Ghot's post. And a really, really lot of collective wisdom in this forum. This is a great place. No insulting or ridiculing people who don't know as much as the guru's here.

    I'm not an IT professional, but lots of people in this forum are. I learn a lot from them, even though I already have lots of Windows skills. And they are very generous with their time. This is my GO TO forum for all things Windows and many related areas.
      My Computers


 

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