My laptop battery drains when completely shutdown

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  1. Posts : 5
    10
       #1

    My laptop battery drains when completely shutdown


    Hello. I am still having problems with the battery getting completely drained when the computer is turned off.

    A 80% battery will not last more than 2 weeks with the computer shut down. If I turn it on after 2 weeks, the battery will be at 0%.

    I have turned off "fast startup". I have turned off hibernation (which made "fast startup" option dissapeared).

    Still the same problem. I don't know what else to do. Can anyone suggest a solution please?

    Windows version 17763.1217
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,156
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit v21H2
       #2

    Are you sure your computer is really powered down and not sleeping? A sleeping computer will look powered down but will still draw power for the RAM. Keeping the RAM powered will allow you to quickly continue later from where you left off.

    If your computer goes to sleep you may think it is powered down but it will eventually run down the battery after a period of time. That happens to me once in a while. In the morning my laptop will either not power up at all or briefly show a critical power message before shutting down again. Only then do I realize I must have let it go to sleep. What I should have done was wake it the night before and then shut it down the proper way.
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 4,573
    Windows 10 Pro
       #3

    Pull the battery when you shut off the PC, plug it in when you want to use it again.

    Is the battery drained to 0% ?

    Also, how old is this particular battery ?

    I mean how often is it used ?

    Any bulging ?

    Is the warranty over ?

    Have you considered buying a new battery ?
    Last edited by AddRAM; 07 May 2021 at 06:18.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 3,987
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #4

    AddRAM gave you some good suggestions to see if the battery is healthy.
    If you using the computer and take out the charger, does the battery holds normally?
    If it discharges out of the computer it is or if it discharge very fast on battery mode it is time to replace the battery.
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 934
    Win10 Version 21H2 19044.1645
       #5

    messerschmitt said:
    Hello. I am still having problems with the battery getting completely drained when the computer is turned off.

    A 80% battery will not last more than 2 weeks with the computer shut down. If I turn it on after 2 weeks, the battery will be at 0%.

    I have turned off "fast startup". I have turned off hibernation (which made "fast startup" option dissapeared).

    Still the same problem. I don't know what else to do. Can anyone suggest a solution please?

    Windows version 17763.1217

    Welcome to the forum !

    Please take time to complete your system specs in the My Computer section of your user column.
    (bottom). Much needed to solve issues.

    Have you contacted the manufacturer's site/help center ? Is your battery built-in ?
    Last edited by csun; 07 May 2021 at 16:49.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 1,156
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit v21H2
       #6

    Open Command prompt with Admin privileges. Run this to get a battery report:

    Code:
    powercfg /batteryreport /output "C:\battery_report.html
    How to generate a Battery Report in Windows 10
    How to generate a Battery Report in Windows 10 | Windows Central
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 405
    Windows 10 21H1
       #7

    How old is the laptop?

    First of all, it's not unusual for a device battery to discharge when not in use. With time, the battery gets "old" and holds charge for shorter and shorter time. My car manufacturer explicitly states that the battery is subject to "wear and tear" and hence is not covered under warranty beyond the first 6 months. Of course, in a car the battery can be replaced, while in most modern laptops (as well as phones, tablets, etc.) it cannot. Basically, if you need the laptop as an actual mobile device (that is, if you are on the road all the time), then most likely it's time to buy a new laptop. Otherwise, just plug it in as necessary and don't worry about something you can't control.

    Edit: I just ran the powercfg on my old Windows 7 laptop. Battery capacity: 52497, Last full charge: 36719 (this last entry is called slightly differently in Windows 10). This tells me that the battery needs to be replaced, but since it's built in, the laptop needs to be replaced. Which I know without running this tool - the thing hardly lasts an hour on battery. Now, that laptop was manufactured in 2014. Duh!
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 11,387
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #8

    unifex said:
    Battery capacity: 52497, Last full charge: 36719 (this last entry is called slightly differently in Windows 10). This tells me that the battery needs to be replaced ...
    That seems rather premature. It can still hold 70% of the charge it was designed to hold.

    unifex said:
    … since it's built in, the laptop needs to be replaced.
    Your laptop's service manual almost certainly describes the procedure for replacing its built-in battery.
    Replacing my built-in battery takes about two minutes.

    All the best,
    Denis
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 1,806
    Windows 10 Pro 21H1 19043.1348
       #9

    unifex said:
    How old is the laptop?

    First of all, it's not unusual for a device battery to discharge when not in use. With time, the battery gets "old" and holds charge for shorter and shorter time. My car manufacturer explicitly states that the battery is subject to "wear and tear" and hence is not covered under warranty beyond the first 6 months. Of course, in a car the battery can be replaced, while in most modern laptops (as well as phones, tablets, etc.) it cannot. Basically, if you need the laptop as an actual mobile device (that is, if you are on the road all the time), then most likely it's time to buy a new laptop. Otherwise, just plug it in as necessary and don't worry about something you can't control.

    Edit: I just ran the powercfg on my old Windows 7 laptop. Battery capacity: 52497, Last full charge: 36719 (this last entry is called slightly differently in Windows 10). This tells me that the battery needs to be replaced, but since it's built in, the laptop needs to be replaced. Which I know without running this tool - the thing hardly lasts an hour on battery. Now, that laptop was manufactured in 2014. Duh!



    The last time I was inside my primary laptop (that has a built-in battery) it appears near effortless to replace the battery pack. This MSI laptop has just 3 screws holding a 'run of the mill' standardized Li-ion 18650 type battery pack with a simple connector, not that soldering 2 wires would have ever deterred me.

    I would expect the majority of laptops to have a similar arrangement to keep production costs down. If someone could just not bring themselves to complete such a task, I'm confident that most any halfway competent repair facility would be happy to complete the repair for a reasonable charge.

    I've been rebuilding scuba dive light Lithium battery cannisters and drysuit heater batteries for about 10 years. They're designed as non-serviceable throw-aways or send them back to the manufacturer to have them rebuilt for almost the original cost. They aren't much effort to rebuild or obtain replacement battery packs direct from battery manufacturers.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 1,156
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit v21H2
       #10

    W10 Tweaker said:
    The last time I was inside my primary laptop (that has a built-in battery) it appears near effortless to replace the battery pack. This MSI laptop has just 3 screws holding a 'run of the mill' standardized Li-ion 18650 type battery pack with a simple connector, not that soldering 2 wires would have ever deterred me.

    I would expect the majority of laptops to have a similar arrangement to keep production costs down. If someone could just not bring themselves to complete such a task, I'm confident that most any halfway competent repair facility would be happy to complete the repair for a reasonable charge.

    I've been rebuilding scuba dive light Lithium battery cannisters and drysuit heater batteries for about 10 years. They're designed as non-serviceable throw-aways or send them back to the manufacturer to have them rebuilt for almost the original cost. They aren't much effort to rebuild or obtain replacement battery packs direct from battery manufacturers.
    That is probably true for standard size laptops but thin and light laptops tend to be a lot more difficult to disassemble. For my Acer laptop I have to remove 12 screws and use a pry tool to separate the top and bottom halves of the laptop. This usually takes about 10 to 15 minutes. It is a simple thing to then replace the battery. Then it takes about 10 minutes to reassemble the laptop. This always makes me nervous because if I try to rush things I might break something. Acer says this laptop is not user serviceable. I only do it myself because I have the tools and expertise to do it.
      My Computers


 

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