Black screen instead of bootloader, then start

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  1. Posts : 21,421
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #41

    No, doesn't work that way.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 23
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #42

    NavyLCDR said:
    The first command that I run on any install of Windows is:
    powercfg -h off

    And here's a question...if you are not going to try the solutions we are suggesting for your problem, then why post your problem here?

    Windows 10 fast startup and hibernation are known to interfere with dual booting. The powercfg command is the easy way to turn them off.
    Sorry I just want to make sure the suggestions are safe.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I tried disabling the fast startup in both OS in Control Panel - the 30 sec wait with blan screen still appears. But this time, if I shut the laptop off and turn it on (not restart), there's no Windows Boot Manager, but again the 30 sec blank screen wait. However, I can still access WBM from the previous menu which I can enter pressing F12.

    Also, note that hibernate was unchecked in Control Panel in both OS in the first place.

    Seems that maybe Windows Boot Manager wasn't recorded (set up) for the second installation correctly?

    I'll mention again that these two installations are from different source.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Maybe there're like two Windows Boot Managers installed, and probably my laptop is set to start the newer one which is kind of bugged. Strange, since I downloaded the second Windows from the official Microsoft website.
    When I press ESC at laptop turn on and enter the Boot menu, there's one Windows Boot Manager option and when I choose it it goes to the 30 sec black screen, so it seems it is the newer one.
    However, when I press F12 the laptop goes to the previous Windows menu, and when I chose to enter the Windows Boot Manager menu from it, it seems to go to the older WBM which shows properly.

    So maybe I should set the older WBM to be "default"?

    What exactly is happening?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 18,453
    Windows 11 Pro
       #43

    First we need to see two things to start with. We need a screenshot of disk management. Please follow all steps of tutorial:
    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of

    And we need to see the output of the bcdedit command. Run it in a Command Prompt with Admin privileges:

    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>bcdedit
    
    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier              {bootmgr}
    device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume3
    path                    \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description             Windows Boot Manager
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {globalsettings}
    default                 {current}
    resumeobject            {ccd5b625-550a-11eb-9184-3413e83d466c}
    displayorder            {f589e17f-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
                            {current}
    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}
    timeout                 30
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {f589e17f-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    device                  partition=T:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 10 Temp
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {f589e180-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    displaymessageoverride  Recovery
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                partition=T:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {f589e17e-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {current}
    device                  partition=C:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 10
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {f589e178-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                partition=C:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {ccd5b625-550a-11eb-9184-3413e83d466c}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
    The bcdedit command by itself will not change anything. It will only display what is in the existing BCD (Boot Configuration Data).
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 23
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #44

    NavyLCDR said:
    First we need to see two things to start with. We need a screenshot of disk management. Please follow all steps of tutorial:
    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of

    And we need to see the output of the bcdedit command. Run it in a Command Prompt with Admin privileges:

    Code:
    C:\Windows\system32>bcdedit
    
    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier              {bootmgr}
    device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume3
    path                    \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description             Windows Boot Manager
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {globalsettings}
    default                 {current}
    resumeobject            {ccd5b625-550a-11eb-9184-3413e83d466c}
    displayorder            {f589e17f-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
                            {current}
    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}
    timeout                 30
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {f589e17f-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    device                  partition=T:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 10 Temp
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {f589e180-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    displaymessageoverride  Recovery
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                partition=T:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {f589e17e-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {current}
    device                  partition=C:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 10
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {f589e178-630f-11eb-9197-3413e83d466c}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                partition=C:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {ccd5b625-550a-11eb-9184-3413e83d466c}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    C:\Windows\system32>
    The bcdedit command by itself will not change anything. It will only display what is in the existing BCD (Boot Configuration Data).
    Disk Management: https://i.snipboard.io/P5yLed.jpg

    BCD EDIT: https://i.snipboard.io/5kCmKD.jpg

    I'm on my newer installation RN.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Sorry, let me make another show another better SS of Disk Management: https://i.snipboard.io/bndx23.jpg
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 18,453
    Windows 11 Pro
       #45

    You've only got 1 boot loader/manager installed on the 62 MB EFI System Partition.

    The place to start troubleshooting is to determine if the presence of hiberfil.sys file on the root of both Windows installations drives is interfering with booting, but you refuse to run the simple command of:
    powercfg -h off

    which needs to be run on both Windows installations. That's the place to start, but you refuse to so far. When either Windows fast startup or hibernation is enabled and you shut down the computer from Windows, certain configuration data gets saved to the hiberfil.sys file. If anything saved in that configuration data gets changed, such as by UEFI firmware dual booting or by the other installed OS, then when Windows starts up and reads the previously saved configuration data that no longer matches the exact same configuration of the current state of the computer, problems occur.

    powercfg -h off simply disables hibernation, deletes the hiberfil.sys file from the root of the drive, and since Windows fast startup depends upon hibernation and the existence of hiberfil.sys file, Windows fast startup gets disabled as well. Later, if you want to reverse the change, all you have to do is run powercfg -h on.

    powercfg -h off needs to be run on all Windows OSes installed on a dual or multi-boot system.

    To delete the old Windows installation you will need to run a bcdedit /delete command to remove that Windows installation from the BCD, then you can delete the partition that Windows was installed on and add that space to another existing partition.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 23
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #46

    NavyLCDR said:
    You've only got 1 boot loader/manager installed on the 62 MB EFI System Partition.

    The place to start troubleshooting is to determine if the presence of hiberfil.sys file on the root of both Windows installations drives is interfering with booting, but you refuse to run the simple command of:
    powercfg -h off

    which needs to be run on both Windows installations. That's the place to start, but you refuse to so far. When either Windows fast startup or hibernation is enabled and you shut down the computer from Windows, certain configuration data gets saved to the hiberfil.sys file. If anything saved in that configuration data gets changed, such as by UEFI firmware dual booting or by the other installed OS, then when Windows starts up and reads the previously saved configuration data that no longer matches the exact same configuration of the current state of the computer, problems occur.

    powercfg -h off simply disables hibernation, deletes the hiberfil.sys file from the root of the drive, and since Windows fast startup depends upon hibernation and the existence of hiberfil.sys file, Windows fast startup gets disabled as well. Later, if you want to reverse the change, all you have to do is run powercfg -h on.

    powercfg -h off needs to be run on all Windows OSes installed on a dual or multi-boot system.

    To delete the old Windows installation you will need to run a bcdedit /delete command to remove that Windows installation from the BCD, then you can delete the partition that Windows was installed on and add that space to another existing partition.
    I ran the command on both OS.

    No changes. Honestly, it isn't logical for it to fix the issue, since the Windows Boot Manager is indeed initiliazing except there's no picture.

    Maybe it's another issue - bad WBM installation because of the fast boot/hibernation maybe. Or maybe something wrong with the graphics (drivers etc.)...
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 21,421
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #47

    manvas said:
    I ran the command on both OS.

    No changes. Honestly, it isn't logical for it to fix the issue, since the Windows Boot Manager is indeed initiliazing except there's no picture.

    Maybe it's another issue - bad WBM installation because of the fast boot/hibernation maybe. Or maybe something wrong with the graphics (drivers etc.)...
    What is your BIOS boot mode - UEFI or something else?
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 23
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #48

    steve108 said:
    What is your BIOS boot mode - UEFI or something else?
    Where can I check that?

    Also, do you think these updates might fix the issue? https://i.snipboard.io/y9dG5F.jpg

    - - - Updated - - -

    In Windows System Information it says BIOS Mode: UEFI.

    Btw, I don't exactly know what these modes are? Is the UEFI like, the graphical user interface BIOS? Because mine isn't graphical, it's normal BIOS.

    I installed the first installation by Rufus USB installation (installation not downloaded from official microsoft website), and I installed the second one with Microsoft Windows installation media tool USB.
    Maybe the issue is that the second USB installation was wrongly performed, with wrong settings etc.?
    Or maybe the first installation is not UEFI...

    I'm confused.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 21,421
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #49

    manvas said:
    Where can I check that?

    Also, do you think these updates might fix the issue? https://i.snipboard.io/y9dG5F.jpg
    You have to look in your BIOS - if you don't know how, google for your model or don't worry about it.

    Let's see what NavyLCDR says about those driver updates. Check from your PC website if you have their current driver recommendations.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 21,421
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #50
      My Computer


 

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