Switch On Anomaly

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  1. Posts : 115
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit with May 2020 update
       #1

    Switch On Anomaly


    I have recently purchased a refurbished Dell Optiplex 7010MT desktop pc with Windows 10 Pro ver 1909 installed which is working well.There is a very odd feature however, on startup I switch on the power at the mains socket and immediatly the switch on the start button on the front of the tower lights up and there is the sound of the fans starting. This lasts for a second or two and then all goes dead. If I then press the start button the computer starts normally. Now this is not a serious problem, only a minor nuisance, but I would like to get get rid of it if possible without compromising the computer, anyone got any ideas?
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  2. Posts : 1,495
    Win10 Pro
       #2

    I think that’s normal when you disconnect power at the wall. Why not just shut down the PC and l let it remain connected to the wall outlet?
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  3. Posts : 25,079
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #3

    A Gray said:
    There is a very odd feature however, on startup I switch on the power at the mains socket and immediatly the switch on the start button on the front of the tower lights up and there is the sound of the fans starting. This lasts for a second or two and then all goes dead. If I then press the start button the computer starts normally.
    That sounds normal. Modern systems have a software-activated power switch so the power supply will be in a very low power standby mode while plugged in to the mains.

    You may find these useful:

    Dell | OptiPlex 9010/7010 Mini-Tower Owner's Manual - pdf
    Dell | Optiplex 7010 Technical Guidebook - pdf
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  4. Posts : 17,369
    Windows 11 Pro
       #4

    My vote is also for completely normal behavior.
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  5. Posts : 115
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit with May 2020 update
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Hi, Thanks for your responses. I'm a little surprised that you recommend leaving the pc on standby as it were. It may not use much power but we are all being encouraged to save energy and switch off appliances when not in use. This is the first computer I've had that has this feature. I am also concerned about power surges e.g. from Lightning strikes, possibly damaging the computer, I am not very confident that anti-surge sockets are all that safe. I note that one of the replies comes from the States where the mains voltage is much lower than in the UK so perhaps over there you are not so concerned about leaving appliances live when not in use. I will consult the manuals to see what They have to say.
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  6. Posts : 17,369
    Windows 11 Pro
       #6

    A Gray said:
    I note that one of the replies comes from the States where the mains voltage is much lower than in the UK so perhaps over there you are not so concerned about leaving appliances live when not in use. I will consult the manuals to see what They have to say.
    The difference in voltage really doesn't matter. Power consumption is measured in watts. It just takes twice as much current (amps) in the US at 110v to produce the same amount of watts as it does in the UK at 220v.

    Also, any electronic device that has a remote control uses power when it is turned off (to keep the remote receiver alive to be able to turn it on.) So by the same theory, you should be unplugging or turning off the main power switch to the outlets those devices are plugged into such as TVs, DVD players, stereos, etc. Also if you have any phone chargers plugged in, their solid state converters will still use energy when plugged in, even though they are not charging anything. Here's a big one: How about your water heater? Is it on demand, or a tank type that has to keep that whole tank of water hot in between uses? Just providing some illustrations of other energy wasters that you should be concerned about if you are concerned about a computer power supply using energy when in standby.
    Last edited by NavyLCDR; 16 Jul 2020 at 16:10.
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  7. Posts : 25,079
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #7

    A Gray said:
    I'm a little surprised that you recommend leaving the pc on standby as it were. It may not use much power but we are all being encouraged to save energy and switch off appliances when not in use.

    Almost everything is powered down. Just the bare minimum circuitry needed to respond to a push on the power button is actually powered and on standby. From the Technical Guidebook I gave a link for earlier, your machine meets stringent energy saving regulations, including the "Erp Lot6 Tier 2 0.5watt requirement" (an EU directive). This means when plugged in but turned off it consumes less than 0.5 watts.

    To put that into perspective, you would need to leave it plugged in and turned off for more than four months to consume the same power as a 60W lightbulb left on for an hour.
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  8. Posts : 115
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit with May 2020 update
    Thread Starter
       #8

    Hi All, I appreciate what you say and for convenience it is easier to be able to press a button on a remote control and power things up that way. I suppose I'm a bit old fashioned (I am an octogenarian after all) and prefer to know that appliances are switched off fully when not in use. As regards the Dell computer if I leave the power on,since they are powered from the same switched multi-way, the monitor and speakers will also be left on unless I deliberately go to their switches and turn them off which is not so convenient.
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  9. Posts : 4
    Windows 10 Pro
       #9

    A Gray said:
    Hi All, I appreciate what you say and for convenience it is easier to be able to press a button on a remote control and power things up that way. I suppose I'm a bit old fashioned (I am an octogenarian after all) and prefer to know that appliances are switched off fully when not in use. As regards the Dell computer if I leave the power on,since they are powered from the same switched multi-way, the monitor and speakers will also be left on unless I deliberately go to their switches and turn them off which is not so convenient.
    Maybe what you could do in the BIOS is start-up after a power failure, then when you switch on at the wall it should autoboot.
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  10. Posts : 4,472
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #10

    A Gray said:
    Hi All, I appreciate what you say and for convenience it is easier to be able to press a button on a remote control and power things up that way. I suppose I'm a bit old fashioned (I am an octogenarian after all) and prefer to know that appliances are switched off fully when not in use. As regards the Dell computer if I leave the power on,since they are powered from the same switched multi-way, the monitor and speakers will also be left on unless I deliberately go to their switches and turn them off which is not so convenient.
    Well, I have three of my systems connected to a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) and that is turned off when I am finished.
    Upon UPS power-on, I just turn on my monitor and then the computer. I only have to press the power button on the computer once.

    These are a mix Dell and Homebuilt systems.

    There are times when I have to press the power button twice, usually if the system is not powered down properly or loses power while operating - more so on laptops.

    FWIW.

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