Authorized advice for power conditioner for new laptop

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  1. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 build 19042.920 x64
       #1

    Authorized advice for power conditioner for new laptop


    Hello friends,
    I was recently approved for a grant that will pay for a brand new ASUS ProArt StudioBook Pro 17 W700G3T-XH77 w/a 1TB PCIe NVMe, 16GB DDR4 RAM at 2666 MHz, Intel i7-9750H 2.6GHz hexa-core processor. So you can see why I'd love advice from a licensed electrician for the ideal power conditioner to protect this investment. I have been thinking about a Furman PT-8 or PT-8DIG.
    But when reviewing those, people have said that they do not block too much noise (mV) coming from a typical electrical receptacle and that the plate has to be flat or else its plug will not insert properly. I want to use a power conditioner mainly for surge protection. But, eliminating as many mV as possible would be a desired plus, as well.

    Thank you,
    TechWizard
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,513
    X
       #2

    For a few buck you can add a rider to your homeowner's insurance to cover against damage. Contact your agent.

    BTW, this works better than the power conditioners. And it's cheaper.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 4,457
    Win 11 Pro 22000.708
       #3

    I'm not sure I'd call a PT-8 a power conditioner. It's a surge protector with some noise suppression. It still contains MOVs (metal oxide varistors) like a $5 surge strip, although there's a lot of additional circuitry present.

    I'm using one on my audio gear. Probably pointless over a cheaper surge protector, as I don't get a lot of line noise.

    For my desktop PC, I'm using a Cyberpower 1325VA UPS. Their most similar unit currently available is an LX1325GU. It does inline voltage regulation, so you always get 120V (±5%). It has a "simulated" sinewave output. (That applies when it's running off of battery.)

    You can spend more and get "true" sinewave, or more yet and get a double conversion unit. The latter is always generating the AC waveform; it doesn't switch over when the AC power drops.

    I'm not sure how much if any of this is desirable with a laptop. It's not connected directly to the wall, but rather through a charger. I'd hope that the charger would eliminate most of the issues with the AC line. (Including sacrificing itself if you got a surge.) Call me an optimist.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 2,508
    Win 11 Pro
       #4

    I would consider power line surges, dropouts or dips the most common power line problems.
    I'm a retired LAN/WAN Network and hardware help desk manager for a Federal Government agency. We did extensive AC line testing at our field offices when the agency went from IBM 3270 terminals to PC/LAN's. Line noise was not an issue in almost all locations.

    A high quality surge suppressor will do for most. I'm not talking $10 or even $100 units, the ones we used were $200 (on a mass contract buy).
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 8,691
    Mac OS Catalina
       #5

    You really do not need anything other than a portable plug in surge protector. No need to put in that equipment for something that is designed to be portable. Laptop power supplies already have a built in conditioner by using the Battery how a UPS does to condition power.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 build 19042.920 x64
    Thread Starter
       #6

    Thank you for everyone's feedback. Checking up on the model laptop, it comes w/a 57Wh 3 cell Li-ion battery. Also, I did some more research, which highly suggests not to charge batteries all the time, which I've known for quite a while. This guide from GamersNexus is pretty helpful. So, again, w/all the feedback and the guide, I have decided to just plug the laptop in first, then to a grounded power outlet.

    Thanks,
    TechWizard

    - - - Updated - - -

    Additional note: YouTube channel Bright Side says if you're not going to use your battery, it is best to store it in your refrigerator wrapping it in a waterproof package so that it will not oxidize and retain all of its properties! Link here
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 8,691
    Mac OS Catalina
       #7

    TechWizard said:
    Thank you for everyone's feedback. Checking up on the model laptop, it comes w/a 57Wh 3 cell Li-ion battery. Also, I did some more research, which highly suggests not to charge batteries all the time, which I've known for quite a while. This guide from GamersNexus is pretty helpful. So, again, w/all the feedback and the guide, I have decided to just plug the laptop in first, then to a grounded power outlet.

    Thanks,
    TechWizard

    - - - Updated - - -

    Additional note: YouTube channel Bright Side says if you're not going to use your battery, it is best to store it in your refrigerator wrapping it in a waterproof package so that it will not oxidize and retain all of its properties! Link here
    First off, you do not store batteries in a freezer or fridge. Second, modern devices have processors in the batteries to tell the laptop if it is charged, OEM certified and is used in the same way that a UPS works in conditioning power. The other is that the laptop knows when to stop charging and when it needs to charge. It is fine to leave plugged in. I keep my Macbook Air plugged in all of the time due to I use it for video conferencing and second, it is to make sure that I have it fully charged for when I am going to use it on or off the charger.

    Everything in those Brightside videos is what is called “Junk Science”.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 252
    Windows 10 Pro
       #8

    I have a Samsung Spin 7. There's a piece of software on it, from Samsung, that keeps the battery at 85%. This is done, so I'm told, so you can leave the charger plugged in all the time and not kill the battery.

    See HERE under Use Samsung Settings>Power Management

    Power Management: Extend your PC's battery life by preventing the battery from charging over 85%.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 7,128
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #9

    bro67 said:
    First off, you do not store batteries in a freezer or fridge. Second, modern devices have processors in the batteries to tell the laptop if it is charged, OEM certified and is used in the same way that a UPS works in conditioning power. The other is that the laptop knows when to stop charging and when it needs to charge. It is fine to leave plugged in. I keep my Macbook Air plugged in all of the time due to I use it for video conferencing and second, it is to make sure that I have it fully charged for when I am going to use it on or off the charger.

    Everything in those Brightside videos is what is called “Junk Science”.
    That is not only Junk Science but very bad advise. No way would I put any batteries in my refrigerator. Especially a Li-ion battery.
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 build 19042.920 x64
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Thank you all very much for your comments! As you can tell, I am still learning. I haven't had a brand new laptop since '01 and I cannot remember if I kept that plugged in at the house while doing homework or not. The saying "Together, we know more" is very true.

    TechWizard
      My Computer


 

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