UEFI / Legacy BIOS Mess and Windows Update

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  1. Posts : 39,972
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #11

    OldNavyGuy said:
    Buy it.

    Worth the money.

    - - - Updated - - -



    With that much code to copy and paste, it would be a heck of a lot easier for users to just put it in a .ps1 file for them.

    Attachment 285857

    Since the script doesn't zip anything up, or put everything in one folder with an identifiable name, how is the user going to distingush what the script put in the Temp folder from anything else?

    Better off to use V2.

    What steps did you make to create the zip?
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #12

    Copied the code into a text file and saved it with the name I gave it with the .ps1 extension.

    Right-clicked on the .ps1 file and selected Send to > Compressed (zipped) folder.

    Added a dash in the name, since PowerShell doesn't like spaces in script names.

    Re-uploaded to post #10.
    Last edited by OldNavyGuy; 29 Jun 2020 at 20:47.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 17,281
    Windows 11 Pro
       #13

    Tonkski said:
    Thanks. Partition Wizard sounds worth a try. I have a spare HDD which I can clone to as a backup if it doesnít work. Iím a bit concerned that it might not be possible to cleanly convert the messed-up disk and I donít have the knowledge to be able to fix it manually, but itís worth a try.
    @Tonkski,

    Use Macrium Reflect Free to make a backup image of your existing drive to the spare HDD. Do a clean install of Windows 10 to the current drive in UEFI mode (make sure to delete all the partitions on the existing drive during the clean install). Then restore ONLY the C: drive partition from you backup image right over the top of the new C: drive partition created by the clean install. I would also suggest when you use Macrium Reflect Free that you create a Macrium Rescue USB flash drive because after copying your backup image of C: drive back to the original disk, you may need to run the utility included with Macrium Reflect to fix Windows boot problems, and that is only available when booted from the rescue USB flash.

    This will give you a completely proper layout for UEFI on your disk, and you get to keep your previous OS. This method won't cost you anything but time.
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  4. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #14

    I think the UEFI boot files need to be configured in the EFI partition as well, after the restore.

    See the section To restore an image to the GPT disk, ready to boot in UEFI, step 3.

    How to Restore an MBR System image to UEFI/GPT (Convert, GPT, MBR, Restore)
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  5. Posts : 17,281
    Windows 11 Pro
       #15

    OldNavyGuy said:
    I think the UEFI boot files need to be configured in the EFI partition as well, after the restore.
    That is what my suggestion of running the utility to fix Windows boot problems from the Macrium rescue flash drive would do.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 3,847
    Windows 3.1 to Windows 10
       #16

    real simple fix.. Open Command Prompt (Admin) and type
    Code:
    Diskpart
    select disk 0
    select partition 1
    format fs=ntfs label="SYSTEM"
    assign letter="S"
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C:\Windows /s S: /f Bios
    Set BIOS to enable Legacy/CSM support
    This will solve your problem........
    Then you can later choose to reinstall or convert to GPT/UEFI at any time
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #17

    NavyLCDR said:
    That is what my suggestion of running the utility to fix Windows boot problems from the Macrium rescue flash drive would do.
    Right.

    I don't know how experienced the OP is with Macrium, so I provided the link on how to do it.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 11
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #18

    Kyhi said:
    real simple fix.. Open Command Prompt (Admin) and type
    Code:
    Diskpart
    select disk 0
    select partition 1
    format fs=ntfs label="SYSTEM"
    assign letter="S"
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C:\Windows /s S: /f Bios
    Set BIOS to enable Legacy/CSM support
    This will solve your problem........
    Then you can later choose to reinstall or convert to GPT/UEFI at any time
    Could you explain what this will do please?
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 17,281
    Windows 11 Pro
       #19

    Tonkski said:
    Could you explain what this will do please?
    That will reformat your existing system partition that the computer is booting from and then create the boot files needed to boot the computer in legacy BIOS (CSM) mode. After booting in legacy BIOS (CSM) mode, then Windows upgrade should proceed because you will no longer be in UEFI mode.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 27,526
    Windows 10 Pro x64 Version 21H1
       #20

    I think OP said in post #1 he set his BIOS to boot UEFI.

    Would he not have to change this back to "Legacy".

    A snippet from his manual. I did not see option for CSM Mode although "Advance Boot Options" maybe providing this functionality.

    UEFI / Legacy BIOS Mess and Windows Update-image.png

    from here

    https://www.dell.com/support/manuals...ee3&lang=en-us
      My Computer


 

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