Yikes...Can't boot windows 10

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  1. Posts : 7,484
    Windows 10 Home 20H2
       #11

    The following portable app works on Windows PE and is a good tool to check/repair a disk.

    Why Windows 10 Home in my computer is different from others?
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 4,552
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #12

    WinTenUser said:

    Yes, this seemed to be a quick and dirty way to solve the problem. Unfortunately the result of using this command yielded a "Unable to access image."
    Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 7,484
    Windows 10 Home 20H2
       #13

    Run the following commands to find out the correct letter.

    DiskPart
    List Volume

    Source: Uninstall Windows Update in Windows 10
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 78
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #14

    FreeBooter said:
    Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
    OK. That may help.
    I will check it out as soon as TestDisk finishes.

    - - - Updated - - -

    FreeBooter said:
    Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
    Nope.
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-b.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-c.jpg

    - - - Updated - - -

    jumanji said:
    Running TestDisk in WinPE 10 environment:

    In the third screen, it clearly says "EFI GPT Partition table detected" So you should move the highlight to [EFI GPT] EFI GPT Partition map and proceed to analyse. Do that and check whether it shows your files.
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2c.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2g.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2d.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2a.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2e.jpg

    jumanji said:
    If not:
    I can see that your system drive has the drive letter C: in Windows Disk Management screenshot. So I will change track.
    Running TestDisk, in the third screen select / highlight [EFI GPT] - EFI GPT Partition map and press enter. In the next screen instead of [Analyse] select/highlight [Advanced] - File System utilities and press enter.

    Attachment 283369
    Post a screenshot.

    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2e.jpg
    Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2f.jpg

    The only listing here that was able to display files was the second partition and l therefore had no option for the COS drive)
    Bottom Line is that the only partition that I can access is a partition that does not contain the OS.

    I did manage to run Minitool Partition Magic and found the C: Drive(OS) and copied all data I believe I wanted to keep.
    So I think I am good to go.
    jumanji said:
    The general procedure is

    1. If both Boot sector and Backup boot sector are OK, highlight [Repair MFT] and press enter. If it says both MFT and MFT mirror are Ok, then close TestDisk and run CHKDSK C: /f /v /r /x Press enter (Replace C: with the actual drive letter shown in WDM) Allow checkdisk to complete and that should correct the file system error . Caution: Once checkdisk starts running do not for any reason interrupt it. Be patient and allow it to complete even it takes a day. If TestDisk says that it cannot repair MFT, then you may have to use a commercial software like [email protected] File recovery / GetDataBack to recover the data

    2.If Boot sector is bad but Backup boot sector is OK, then select [Backup BS] and press enter to write the backup to the boot sector.

    3. If both Boot sector and Backup Boot sector are bad then move the highlight to [Rebuild BS] to write a new boot sector

    The above repairs should correct the file system corruption and make your disk accessible.

    Let me know how things went.

    And one request. Please write the step by step process you adpopted to prepare a WinPE 10 to run TestDisk . I am a novice on Win10 and should learn
    . ( OK, I have seen Kyhi's Win10XPE - Build Your Own Rescue Media

    but was lazy to do all that . I believe I have in a way gotten tired of Windows. Anyway you did a good job running TestDisk in Win10PE )
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yikes...Can't boot windows 10-2b.jpg  
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4,552
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #15

    The C: partition is RAW this means RAW partition which has not been formatted with the file system (NTFS/FAT32).
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 9,893
    Windows 10 Home 64bit Version 21H2
       #16

    Hi @WinTenUser,

    Glad that you could retrieve the data with some persistent effort
    . I think you used the Data recovery feature in MiniTool Partitzan Wizard 12 or you used MiniTools Power Data Recovery. Whatever, it was your persisitent effort that brought the results. Atleast now let us hope you do a regular backup of your system on a schedule.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 78
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #17

    jumanji said:
    Hi @WinTenUser,

    Glad that you could retrieve the data with some persistent effort
    . I think you used the Data recovery feature in MiniTool Partitzan Wizard 12 or you used MiniTools Power Data Recovery. Whatever, it was your persisitent effort that brought the results. Atleast now let us hope you do a regular backup of your system on a schedule.
    Yes, I hear you on the BACKUP.
    Thanks for your help. It eases the pain of wondering around in the dark!!
      My Computer


 

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