I'm dual booting two windows 10, bootgmr issue

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  1. Posts : 73
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
       #1

    I'm dual booting two windows 10, bootmgr issue


    Basically, a year ago I had only 1TB HDD, that had a Windows 10 on it, after some time, I bought 250GB SSD and installed Windows 10 on it as well, in order to keep my important files, I didn't format my old HDD and that's why I'm now dual booting two Windows 10, what I want to do is to get rid of the Windows 10 on the old HDD (at least by unplugging it from my PC)

    I tried doing that, but I would get this error as shown on the screenshot: https://i.imgur.com/9weoQ9E.png

    When I plug HDD back in, everything works fine, the thing is, I have "bootgmr.sys" file on both of my windows 10, (HDD + SSD), so I don't know what to do, I think my "bootgmr.sys" file is corrupted on my SSD, and my system doesn't recognize it, so I would need to either rebuild it using some software such as EasyBCD or something else, or going into msconfig and removing HDD's Windows 10 from there, I would like to hear your opinion, I pretty have same problem like this guy I want to move windows boot manager from HDD to SSD

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    Here's the screenshot from my Disk Management
    https://i.imgur.com/Gs9rbEg.png
    Last edited by ashramnavivi; 30 May 2020 at 14:53.
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  2. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 5,069
    windows 10
       #2

    Welcome to the forum. The c paritions isnt set as active so it cant boot its booting from the system partition on the other drive which is active. Your best bet is proberley to copy the stsem partition to c but its going to take some juggling to do it
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  3. Posts : 73
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Samuria said:
    Welcome to the forum. The c paritions isnt set as active so it cant boot its booting from the system partition on the other drive which is active. Your best bet is proberley to copy the stsem partition to c but its going to take some juggling to do it
    Thank you for the warm welcome, anyway, how can I do that? I'm not that much experienced into that kind of stuff, I heard that the best bet would be to format the HDD's partitions or something like that.

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    By the default, it's booting on my SSD, I set it by the default to boot on SSD's Windows 10, and that's working fine, however, if I remove the HDD completely from my PC, I get that black screen, probably because Disk 0 (HDD) is marked as "Active" as you've previously said, not sure how would I change that my SSD's Windows 10 partition is marked as "Active" instead.

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    So basically, you're saying that if I move the System Reserved partition to my SSD, it would work fine?
    https://i.imgur.com/Q9BXfjn.png

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    I noticed that this may actually work, but I'm not 100% sure should I try it, basically, I came across this link How to Set or Mark a Partition as Active in Windows, and I saw that I can actually mark my SSD's partition as "Active" since it already has bootmgr file and everything else, and my SSD's drive matches every three cases from this photo: https://i.imgur.com/t3zPRlP.png, and I also have option to mark it as "Active" as showcased on this screenshot: https://i.imgur.com/eifBCOX.png
    I want to hear your opinion

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    What if I try this method?

    Method 2: Move system reserved partition to different drive with command line
    Except for Disk Management, Diskpart can also help you move system reserved partition to another drive, but this method only work well on Windows 7 and Windows 8.

    Now, let's begin the steps:

    Step 1. Open cmd as administrator, type the following command and hit enter.

    bcdboot C:\windows /s C:

    Step 2. Open Disk Management, right-click the C drive and select "Mark Partition as Active".

    Step 3. Select the system reserved partition and tap on "Mark Partition as Inactive ".

    Step 4. Restart your computer and confirm it can boot successfully.

    Step 5. Right-click the system reserved partition and select "Change Drive Letter and Paths", then follow the on-screen instruction to assign a letter for this partition.

    Step 6. Right-click the system reserved partition again and tap on "Delete Volume".
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  4. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 5,069
    windows 10
       #4

    Its not simple as the boot files will be on the other drivve and they need to be there for the disk to work if its set active. In simple terms you need to resize c enough to put the other parition at the front then copy the partition over Top Three Ways to Move System Reserved Partition to Another Drive

    I safer simple way is to remoce the old drive and then do a clean install if you wanted to do that I would wait a few days as the latest version is due any day now and it would be better to install the latest version. If you put an old version on taaking 2 hours then you would get a 2 hour update in a few days
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  5. Posts : 73
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Samuria said:
    Its not simple as the boot files will be on the other drivve and they need to be there for the disk to work if its set active. In simple terms you need to resize c enough to put the other parition at the front then copy the partition over Top Three Ways to Move System Reserved Partition to Another Drive

    I safer simple way is to remoce the old drive and then do a clean install if you wanted to do that I would wait a few days as the latest version is due any day now and it would be better to install the latest version. If you put an old version on taaking 2 hours then you would get a 2 hour update in a few days
    What if I do this Moving System Reserved partition to a different drive | [image]

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    I think I also already have latest Windows 10 version - Windows 10 1909

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    I think I would experience a little problem, which is that on my old HDD's Windows updates weren't made for a lot of time, does that mean if I move the "System Reserved" partition to my C: drive, my Windows files will change or something?
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  6. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 5,069
    windows 10
       #6

    The 1909 version is being replaced any time now with a full new version. There are several ways of moving the parition which ever you try be sure to backup all your data first as if it goes wrong a clean install may be the only option
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  7. Posts : 73
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
    Thread Starter
       #7

    Samuria said:
    The 1909 version is being replaced any time now with a full new version. There are several ways of moving the parition which ever you try be sure to backup all your data first as if it goes wrong a clean install may be the only option
    What would be the best way to backup my data? Also, what would you recommend me to do? Wait for the newest update and then do it or what? Clean install is the easiest option which I do not want to perform because I know there are other ways that can prevent formatting and everything else.
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  8. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 5,069
    windows 10
       #8

    It down to how confident you are with moving paritions its worth looking on youtube as there are a lot of tutors and a video makes it simpler to see
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  9. Posts : 73
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Samuria said:
    It down to how confident you are with moving paritions its worth looking on youtube as there are a lot of tutors and a video makes it simpler to see
    I personally never performed it alone before, I'm pretty sure that the EasyBCD would work, if I follow guide from Kyhi's quote from this link: Moving System Reserved partition to a different drive | [image]
    Kyhi said:
    use EASYBCD > EasyBCD - NeoSmart Technologies
    select BCD Backup/Repair
    Mark, (dot) Change boot drive
    click perform action..

    Attachment 52976
    I find it as the easiest & fastest solution.
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  10. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 13,363
    Windows 10 Pro
       #10

    The solution is super simple. In a command prompt (admin) run:

    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C: /f ALL

    Unplug the HDD and boot up and see what happens.
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