didnt a meta "advanced power options" regfile exist at one point?


  1. Posts : 740
    Windows 10 x64 Pro
       #1

    didnt a meta "advanced power options" regfile exist at one point?


    I could have sworn a comprehensive regfile including all the prominent advanced power options for the power advanced menu existed somewhere?

    I'm having little luck with google other than spatterings of one or the other here or there.

    Anyone know what im talking about, or have one stashed away?

    the one I have is from 2014 and its not comprehensive and certainly not windows 10 era.
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  2. Posts : 16,561
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 22H2 Build 19045.3930
       #2

    You could have searched the tutorials list for Power Options -

    These tutorials will provide each individual element that you might wish to combine into the single comprehensive regfile you want.

    Hard disk burst ignore time in Power Options - Add or Remove in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Adaptive backlight' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Adaptive display' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'AHCI Link Power Management - HIPM/DIPM' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Allow Away Mode Policy' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Allow display required policy' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Allow sleep with remote opens' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Allow system required policy' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Allow wake timers' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Console lock display off timeout' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Critical battery action' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Critical battery level' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Critical battery notification' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Device idle policy' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Dim display after' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Dimmed display brightness' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Display brightness' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Enable adaptive brightness' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Enable forced button/lid shutdown' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Energy Saver settings' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Hard disk burst ignore time' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Hibernate after' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Hub Selective Suspend Timeout' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Internet Explorer' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Lid close action' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Lid open action' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Link State Power Management' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Low battery action' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Low battery level' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Low battery notification' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Maximum processor frequency' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Maximum processor state' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Minimum processor state' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Networking connectivity in Standby' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Power button action' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Primary NVMe Idle Timeout' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Processor performance decrease threshold' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Processor performance increase threshold' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Require a password on wakeup' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Reserve battery level' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'SEC NVMe Idle Timeout' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Sleep after' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Sleep button action' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Slide show' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'System cooling policy' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'System unattended sleep timeout' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Turn off Display after' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Turn off hard disk after' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'USB 3 Link Power Management' in Windows
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'USB selective suspend setting' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Video playback quality bias' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'When playing video' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'When sharing media' in Windows 10
    Power Options - Add or Remove 'Wireless Adapter Settings' in Windows 10
    Win+X Menu Power Options - Control Panel or Settings in Windows 10


    Denis
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 740
    Windows 10 x64 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    yeap, those are part of what i found. was hoping something comprehensive was about. Used to be as I know i didnt make the original I have.

    I think its win ~8 era though.

    will get to going through that hot mess and smashing em all together.

    Appreciate the links all in one place though <3

    mine also seems to have core parking which im not seeing in that list. Might be deprecated though.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 16,561
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 22H2 Build 19045.3930
       #4

    Core parking entries remain in the output from PowerCfg -qh {q just includes hidden properties} but there's no telling if they are just there for fun or if they still have any effect.

    Old MS power policy documents from 2010 make it quite clear that MS thinks only processor designers could use this parameter correctly [they even discourage computer makers from fiddling with it]

    Taken from - Processor Power Management in Windows 7
    Core Parking is a new Windows kernel power manager and kernel scheduler technology that helps improve the energy efficiency of a system by dynamically scaling the number of logical processors that are in use based on workload. Similar to how processor performance states help scale the performance of a single processor, Core Parking is designed to help scale the performance and energy efficiency across the set of logical processors in the system. When the Core Parking algorithm reduces the number of logical processors that are in use, it parks some of the logical processors in the system. The kernel scheduler correspondingly gives preference to unparked logical processors rather than parked logical processors when it schedules any non-affinitized threads. This lets the parked logical processors become idle, which in turn lets the corresponding processor cores transition into a lower power idle state.
    Core Parking is most effective on systems that have processor idle states with extremely low power consumption. When combined with ITTD, Core Parking helps reduce the amount of interrupt activity on systems that run Hyper-V. On systems with processors that include Intel Hyper-Threading Technology, Core Parking is also leveraged to help intelligently schedule work between threads that are running on multiple logical processors in the same processor core.
    We have engaged with leading processor vendors to tune the Core Parking policy defaults. System manufacturers are encouraged to change the Core Parking policy parameters only with detailed consultation from the system processor vendor.
    Core Parking is supported only on Windows Server 2008 R2. However, the Core Parking algorithm and infrastructure is also used to balance processor performance between logical processors on Windows 7 client systems with processors that include Intel Hyper-Threading Technology.
    These links cover some of the same ground as Processor Power Management in Windows 7
    CPU Power Management [2018] - MSDocs
    Processor Power Management [2019] - MSDocs
    Processor power management options [2017] - MSDocs

    And note that Configure power settings - MSDocs does not even mention core parking.

    Denis
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 740
    Windows 10 x64 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #5

    yea the core parking is interesting as it still "works" as in shows up. Same with

    Code:
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings\54533251-82be-4824-96c1-47b60b740d00\3b04d4fd-1cc7-4f23-ab1c-d1337819c4bb]
    "Attributes"=dword:00000000
    for "Allow Throttle States"

    thats all ive found so far regarding discrepancies with that list, but im just starting this endeavor. two kids home round the clock make things interesting now >.<

    - - - Updated - - -

    actually going to comprise a list of whats missing relative to what i have and have confirmed to work as far as still presenting in the UI. Will get it up by the end of the day and someone a bit more technically minded can poke at them and determine if they should be added to brinks complete (or otherwise) list.

    since they're not there at current, im operating under the assumption he went by microsofts own documentation and theyre deprecated.

    the alternatives are they are simply undocumented (hardly a stretch), or the list is simply incomplete.

    either way, gym time and then ill be back at it
      My Computer


 

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