Will update Win7>Win10 deactivate second Win7 drive in a Dual boot?

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  1. Posts : 88
    Win 10
       #11

    NavyLCDR said:
    HAHAHA. ROFL. I saw your previous posts. ;-).

    And yes, he will be OK, but it still violates the EULA although I don't imagine the Microsoft SWAT team breaking in his door - cyber or real.
    I don't think the OP is so interested in getting into the weeds with legalities or the EULA. He simply wants to know (given his circumstances) if WIn7 will remained activated on his separate partition. My guess is that it will remain activated, especially considering both are installed on the same computer. But the other issue is activation after a certain number of installs. I've done that legitimately several times over the years (changing out hard drive, etc). The worst problem I ever had (if you want to call it that) was the need to call into the automated MS number and go through a bunch of prompts to get the key activated again. And I agree, I don't imagine the Microsoft SWAT team will go breaking down his door in this type of scenario. They've got much bigger things to keep on their radar, such as people mass distributing/pirating the software.
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  2. Posts : 441
    Windows 10
       #12

    NavyLCDR said:
    HAHAHA. ROFL. I saw your previous posts. ;-).


    Hehe yep npz he will be OK
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  3. Posts : 441
    Windows 10
       #13

    scott784 said:
    I don't think the OP is so interested in getting into the weeds with legalities or the EULA. He simply wants to know (given his circumstances) if WIn7 will remained activated on his separate partition. My guess is that it will remain activated, especially considering both are installed on the same computer. But the other issue is activation after a certain number of installs. I've done that legitimately several times over the years (changing out hard drive, etc). The worst problem I ever had (if you want to call it that) was the need to call into the automated MS number and go through a bunch of prompts to get the key activated again. And I agree, I don't imagine the Microsoft SWAT team will go breaking down his door in this type of scenario. They've got much bigger things to keep on their radar, such as people mass distributing/pirating the software.
    Indeed I'm busy looking for BIE.
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  4. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #14

    I only mention the "legality" of such actions because I don't want to get banned from the forums for promoting activities that violate the EULA. Although to be illegal it would have to violate copyright law, which I don't think it does. So, I think illegal is improper - violating the EULA as I read it is more proper.

    I don't think there is a snowball's chance in the dessert that Microsoft will care enough to deactivate anything.
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  5. Posts : 441
    Windows 10
       #15

    NavyLCDR said:
    I only mention the "legality" of such actions because I don't want to get banned from the forums for promoting activities that violate the EULA. Although to be illegal it would have to violate copyright law, which I don't think it does. So, I think illegal is improper - violating the EULA as I read it is more proper.

    I don't think there is a snowball's chance in the dessert that Microsoft will care enough to deactivate anything.
    I think the forum would be more than interested in the activities that violate the EULA that work.
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  6. Posts : 11,177
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #16

    Bazz said:
    Nobody seems to want to answer you mate as what you are doing is not legal.

    Now then on a practical level I don't think you will have any problems because of the fact that you can reinstall your original OS with your original product key anytime you like, however I have not tested this.

    Hi there

    It's NOT ILLEGAL. 100% LEGAL -- The same OS on the same Machine - you can't run both of these at the same time of course.

    You might just as well say that having 3 backups (all activated) with the OS in different stages (perhaps some new software etc) is illegal too.

    The only thing of course is that the 2nd time you try and install the W10 OS you might not get the system activated --this will activate eventually either by phone or when Ms sorts out the activation process properly for the servers in W10.

    There's too much FUD around this issue -- ON THE SAME MACHINE you can install Windows ANY NUMBER OF TIMES LEGALLY (even OEM versions).

    What you must not do is run BOTH installations CONCURRENTLY on the same machine - you can only do that in a VM anyway.

    You can always revert back to your W7 (or previous OS without problem - TAKE A BACKUP).

    Can't see what all the fuss is about -- perfectly OK way of using the OS'es - quite legal so long as they are all done ON THE SAME MACHINE.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  7. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #17

    jimbo45 said:
    Hi there

    It's NOT ILLEGAL. 100% LEGAL -- The same OS on the same Machine - you can't run both of these at the same time of course.

    Cheers
    jimbo

    What is the difference in that and having the same single license Windows installed on 100 different computers so long as only one of them is turned on at a time?
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  8. Posts : 88
    Win 10
       #18

    Delicieuxz said:
    EULA's are not laws. If a section of an EULA is unreasonable in the eyes of a court, it doesn't stand. Microsoft's interpretation of "device" may not be a reasonable interpretation of "device". Most people would understand a device to be the complete system - I.E. a single desktop computer.

    What Microsoft has put forth as their preferred interpretation of device is up for question, I think.
    Very good point.
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  9. Posts : 17,272
    Windows 11 Pro
       #19

    scott784 said:
    Very good point.
    Again, though, the EULA will stand up in court because the user voluntarily agreed to abide by it.
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  10. Posts : 162
    Windows 7 Ultimate 64
       #20

    NavyLCDR said:
    Again, though, the EULA will stand up in court because the user voluntarily agreed to abide by it.
    That's not necessarily true. Until it is tested in court, it can be deemed unenforceable, and if tested in court, it could be found invalid. Agreeing to an EULA as a technicality to access software still doesn't make it law.
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