Is it practical and safe to stick with Windows 7?

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  1. Posts : 3
    win 7 home
       #31

    I keep Win 7 Ultimate, and don't care what others will say.. I know what I could do on it and as long it is going fine I will work with it. I bought another SSD disk. Bought cheap licence for Win 10 on Livekort.com, and installed Win 10, just because my bank request internet bank on Win 10. I will not use it much. It is to complicated now for me and lot of things I don't need.
    I got help with flashing bios for my MSI -B75MA-P45 motherboard and installed new Win 7 in UEFI environment. Some friends told me Win 7 is not designed for UEFI, but with Rufus app I created bootable UEFI Win 7 and no problem on GPT disk. The same was done with Win 10 on Rufus. I installed on separate disks each OS and friend helped me with Ubuntu Grub to get so elegant dual boot Win 7 + Win 10 + Ubuntu (last version-if I like to learn it ..)
    I am happy with solutions which gives me freedom to choose.
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  2. flhthemi's Avatar
    Posts : 236
    Windows 10 Pro
       #32

    Old hardware - this is why I have Win7 still installed on a hard drive I can just toss into my drive bay and boot up. I dont use it often but it's there when I need it. Not going to be booted in Win 7 any longer than needed and will not be connected to the "interweb"
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  3. TechnoMage's Avatar
    Posts : 378
    Win 7 Pro/32, Win 10 Pro/64/32
       #33

    OK, so I'm an OLD Retired Computer tech of forty years. I actually worked on my first (real) computer in 1964. It filled the first floor of a five story building, and it heated all five floors. lol
    It was 1983 before I built my own computer, an IBM PC XT clone. I wanted to try some different things, so I realized I was going to need multiple Hard Drives. My first HD was a Seagate 20 meg drive. (Don't laugh) Then I found a source for the Seagate ST4038, 30 meg drive. And I wound up with three of those.
    There were things I wanted to do with my PC, without messing up the drive that I already had set up. There were different versions of DOS, back in those days, and I wanted to be able to play with one, without messing up the one I already had installed.
    Comprende?

    So, now jump forward to 2020, and I have five HD's (2 SSD's) in my Mid Tower (Pac Man) case.
    Each HD has a different OS or version of OS on it. Actually one drive is a Clone of my #1 SSD, that contains my personal OS, Win-7/Pro/x86.

    Today I've been experimenting with my latest install of Win-10/Pro/64, where I've been trying out the Win-10 Mail app. In just a word, it "Sucks". So I've installed the after-market Email Program, "O.E. Classic". It's so much like Outlook Express, or even Vista's Windows Mail, that the differences are almost invisible. For us old timers who started out with Outlook Express, it's the nuts.

    After several hours of tweaking, tuning, and adding software, my Experimental Win-10/Pro/64 looks and acts very much like my Win-7. It's just an experiment....it will NEVER be my daily driver. But it helps me learn the proper technique for setting up new PC's for my friends and old customers.

    So my advise for anyone who wants to keep their Win-7, and still try Win-10..... Put Win-10 on a separate HD.
    Then you won't loose all your Win-7 stuff, and you'll have plenty of time to get Win-10 set up the way you want it.

    Good Luck, and Cheers Mates!
    TechnoMage
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 1,286
    X
       #34

    How old is your computer? I ask because ... when it's time for a new OS ... it's time for a new computer. The old computer will be too slow for me. And it might perform even worse with the new OS.

    Alternatively ... if you're not in need of a new computer, and if Win 7 works okay ... just keep it. The lack of support is largely irrelevant. Just how much support for Win 7 were you getting before? (None. So it doesn't matter.)

    Support is overblown. Ignore the doomers.
    Just get a new computer when you're ready.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 301
    Windows 10 20H2 (19042.685)
       #35

    I'll chip in with my 2 cents ... I do use Windows 7 most of the time, for work, banking, private records, you name it. I also have Windows 10 installed on a separate drive, which I use to learn about the OS. As mentioned before, I will have to use Windows 10 when I will get a new computer since most likely new hardware will not cooperate with Windows 7 (simply put, there won't be any Windows 7 drivers for new hardware anymore). So, as long as my current hardware works (it's about 7 years old), I will keep running Windows 7, but eventually I will have to change it. That's why I'm learning Windows 10 now.

    In fact, I am already seeing the limitations of Windows 7: recently I got myself a new monitor and while Windows 10 has no problems with it without me actually doing anything, setting up Windows 7 to look decent is a bit of a struggle.

    On a side note, that Windows 10 installation on a separate drive works just fine - definitely not slower that Windows 7. Of course, the installation is relatively lightweight at the moment since I haven't installed all the software that I'm normally running, but the OS itself is fairly crisp.
      My Computer

  6. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,434
    Windows 10 Pro
       #36

    unifex said:
    On a side note, that Windows 10 installation on a separate drive works just fine - definitely not slower that Windows 7. Of course, the installation is relatively lightweight at the moment since I haven't installed all the software that I'm normally running, but the OS itself is fairly crisp.
    Let me make an educated guess: you have not used this tweaker and that optimizer to dumb down Windows 10? Not stopped essential services, not changed default, important registry values? You run it mostly as it was out-of-the-box?

    If so, that's the main reason it's "crisp" for you and why you don't have any major issues with it.

    Kari
      My Computer

  7. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,491
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #37

    Hi folks

    why not run Windows 7 as a VM --these days VM's work very efficiently !!!. And to those who like OE (outlook express) you can still run this on an XP Virtual Machine.

    Virtual Machines are an ideal tool for running legacy software (and in some cases legacy / unsupported hardware) I have some old Vinyl Disc cutting hardware with a stidio application for cutting and creating tracks --still works a treat on a legacy VM XP machine --why should I pay > 20,000 USD to replace hardware that I already have and still functions perfectly.

    I'm often surprised at how many people who don't want to give up their old OS'es never think of using Virtual Machines. That way you can use the legacy OS until the end of the universe if you want to !!! while still enjoying all the benefits of nice new fast modern hardware etc.

    That said I'm really surprised - especially with SSD's how people report W10 is really slow --goodness knows what they run on their machines --I've found all the latest builds of W10 work perfectly with ZERO tinkering (I exclude things like some network settings to connect older devices still using SMB1).

    I suppose though the Home edition (I like to call that W10 Toy edition) might have a lot more bloat than the pro Workstation editions that I use.

    Nothing though is as fast as a Host Linux system - especially one where you just run it as a headless command line server (witout a GUI) and only install exactly those things you need so the whole thing will easily boot with just a few GB assigned for its system files. Another issue though !!.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 301
    Windows 10 20H2 (19042.685)
       #38

    Well, I certainly don't use any third-party "tweakers" or "optimizers". However, I am definitely not comfortable with the way Windows 10 is behaving in the privacy area. I have certainly "opted out" of everything I could find and deactivated the related Tasks. I am also using the Group Policy to ensure Windows 10 does not revert on those settings.

    As far as services, I'm not quite sure which one are in fact "essential", in fact, that's what I mean by "learning Windows 10" - learning what's important and what's bloat. As an example, Cortana and anything speech related is certainly bloat to me - my computer doesn't even have a microphone, so it can't respond to speech whatever the Windows settings! I also don't use search, so all search related services are disabled. As far as I'm concerned, this makes the machine faster (no indexing, etc.), but somebody who actually relies on search for whatever tasks would find these services essential (even though personally I can't imagine what those tasks could be).
      My Computer

  9. farrellart's Avatar
    Posts : 188
    Win 10, Win 7 & KDE Neon
       #39

    margrave55 said:
    How old is your computer? I ask because ... when it's time for a new OS ... it's time for a new computer. The old computer will be too slow for me. And it might perform even worse with the new OS.

    Alternatively ... if you're not in need of a new computer, and if Win 7 works okay ... just keep it. The lack of support is largely irrelevant. Just how much support for Win 7 were you getting before? (None. So it doesn't matter.)

    Support is overblown. Ignore the doomers.
    Just get a new computer when you're ready.
    Totally agree....

    It took Vista x64 ( I think I was one of the few people that liked it ) years before it became problematic to run. Eventually, browsers and plugins stopped working and by then I had built my new workstation. Using the vista hardware ( PSU, GPU etc ) as backup troubleshoot hardware.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 50
    Windows 10 Pro, v20H2, 64bit dual boot with Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS
    Thread Starter
       #40

    jimbo45 said:
    why not run Windows 7 as a VM
    Sounds like a great idea but I fear the process will be beyond my capabilities and I've spent far too long on the W10 install already. I have two HDD's installed in my PC so maybe W7 on one and W10 on the other (as suggested in this thread) would be easier to configure? I guess I'd have the option of either W7 or W10 at boot/startup?

    EDIT: Forgot to mention. PC is about three years old and was built for W10. I purchased it without operating system then installed W7 Pro 32bit (from disc purchased separately). It's a Pentium G4400 3.3GHz. Cheap but no slouch.
      My Computer


 
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