Circle Not Circular

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

  1. Posts : 26
    Windows 7 and 10
       #1

    Circle Not Circular


    I finally have made the transition from 1280 x1024 CRT
    to 1920 x1080 (recommended resolution) flat panel monitor.
    And I encountered a problem: a circle does not look like
    a circle! Instead it is like an ellipse with the major axis vertical.

    How do I correct this error without changing resolution?

    Perhaps someone who also experienced this problem and
    solved it could help me.

    The problem lies with the monitor. I use two CAD
    programs and in both programs the circles are "stretched"
    in the verical direction.

    Monitor: Acer Nitro VG240Y
    OS: Windows 10
    Usage: Computer-Aided Drafting
      My Computer


  2. rqt
    Posts : 130
    Windows 10 mainly 64 bit
       #2

    Does this problem affect applications other than the CAD programs? If not what CAD programs are you using?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 26
    Windows 7 and 10
    Thread Starter
       #3

    1. I am using Inventor and SolidWorks.

    2. Yes. The JPG file I use as desktop background
    has a circle in it. The circle is also stretched.

    rqt said:
    Does this problem affect applications other than the CAD programs? If not what CAD programs are you using?
      My Computer


  4. rqt
    Posts : 130
    Windows 10 mainly 64 bit
       #4

    You might want to check that your desktop wallpaper is not set for "fill" or any other setting that could distort the aspect ratio. Also most display drivers have some scaling settings which can sometimes be used to alter the display aspect ratio - so you might want to check them out..
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4,453
    Win 11 Pro 22000.708
       #5

    Your old display had a 5:4 aspect ratio. Your new one, 16:9.

    It's not obvious to me how you'd go to a vertical stretch.

    Stupid question: what are the display settings for your new monitor? (Settings, system, display.)

    Mine are 3840 X 2160 (recommended), and landscape.
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 26
    Windows 7 and 10
    Thread Starter
       #6

    To bobkn:

    I use:
    1920 x1080 which is therecommended setting.
    Landscape orientation.
    Scaling factor of 150%.

    bobkn said:
    Your old display had a 5:4 aspect ratio. Your new one, 16:9.

    It's not obvious to me how you'd go to a vertical stretch.

    Stupid question: what are the display settings for your new monitor? (Settings, system, display.)

    Mine are 3840 X 2160 (recommended), and landscape.
    - - - Updated - - -

    To rqt:


    In my old CRT monitor the desktop wallpaper's circle is not distorted.

    rqt said:
    You might want to check that your desktop wallpaper is not set for "fill" or any other setting that could distort the aspect ratio. Also most display drivers have some scaling settings which can sometimes be used to alter the display aspect ratio - so you might want to check them out..
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 4,201
    Windows 10 Pro x64 Latest RP
       #7

    The 16:9 ratio for screens is the De-facto standard these days, mostly due to the fact that most TV screens use this format. it's easier (at least at the low cost end) to produce one size and shape of screen and utilise this for both end uses. This can have issues as although the PC monitor uses all the pixels available TV screens tend to not use a few at the edges where on cheaper manufacture can lose quality.

    You now have a monitor that is set, in resolution you need to match this setting to the output of your PC, this needs to be done in the Graphics card setting (right click on the screen should bring up the link) simply change the resolution to match your screen.

    There is a potential issue that depends on the age of your older hardware, as with most things over time advances are made in consumer devices, In TV & Monitor screens this occurs in the resolution and colour control available. Older PC's and Graphics chips could only support a limited range of resolutions, it could be that your existing card will not support your new resolution of 1920 x 1080. If this is the case then you will either have to replace your graphics system with one that does, set up the new monitor to use a resolution that your Graphics system supports, (unlikely, but possible with some higher spec monitors), or put up with the distortion
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 11,246
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #8

    Hi folks
    Sometimes there's all sorts of extra stuff in the hardware settings on the monitor --probably need to use its handset to get into those -- you need to look for something like "Keep aspect ratio" when re-sizing "Windowed " screens etc -- it will depend on your monitor and graphics card.

    There's also sometimes settings like "adjust to fit screen" or similar if the monitor with default settings doesn't exactly fill your screen or is slightly too big.

    These settings are usually in the obscure settings in the menu on the Monitor itself not the graphics settings in Windows.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 856
    Windows 10 Pro 21H2 build 19045.2193 Dual Boot Linux Mint
       #9

    Just a thought, do you have to set the display settings in your Cad programs?
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 26
    Windows 7 and 10
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Sorry, I forgot to mention that I have a new unit!

    Processor - Inter Core i5-9400F.
    OS - Windows 10 Pro, Version 1903.
    Monitor - Acer VG240Y.
    GPU - GeForce GT 730.

    The NVIDIA Control Panel is listed in the Start Menu
    but does not appear when it is selected. But the
    NVIDIA GeForce Experience works.

    Barman58 said:
    The 16:9 ratio for screens is the De-facto standard these days, mostly due to the fact that most TV screens use this format. it's easier (at least at the low cost end) to produce one size and shape of screen and utilise this for both end uses. This can have issues as although the PC monitor uses all the pixels available TV screens tend to not use a few at the edges where on cheaper manufacture can lose quality.

    You now have a monitor that is set, in resolution you need to match this setting to the output of your PC, this needs to be done in the Graphics card setting (right click on the screen should bring up the link) simply change the resolution to match your screen.

    There is a potential issue that depends on the age of your older hardware, as with most things over time advances are made in consumer devices, In TV & Monitor screens this occurs in the resolution and colour control available. Older PC's and Graphics chips could only support a limited range of resolutions, it could be that your existing card will not support your new resolution of 1920 x 1080. If this is the case then you will either have to replace your graphics system with one that does, set up the new monitor to use a resolution that your Graphics system supports, (unlikely, but possible with some higher spec monitors), or put up with the distortion
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:00.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums