Computer is frozen, won't accept input from keyboard or mouse

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  1. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #11

    bearcat22 said:
    What I need to know first is, will this allow me to beboot my computer WITHOUT deleting any personal files?
    Yes.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #12

    dalchina said:
    Easiest for you is to burn it to a DVD.

    I suggest you ask a friend who is more familiar with this sort of thing to give you a hand. It's a lot to take on first time.


    The tutorial IS the 'super detailed' instructions.

    A bootable USB drive is NOT a disk with a copy of the iso on it. That's just a data disk. IT WILL NOT BOOT your computer.
    To create a bootable flash drive you follow the instructions in the tutorial.
    ignatzatsonic said:
    Yes.
    To Dalchina in this thread:

    I haven't seen any more replies from you in my thread.
    This message is to determine if you can't answer, or simply
    don't wish to answer.


    Dalchina Your instruction links have led me to

    Create Bootable USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 10

    First I downloaded a win10 ISO file onto a USB drive.
    Then, I chose option 2, and put Rufus on the desktop.
    I am now at step 5 of Option 2.

    this gives two choices, with no explanation whatsoever of what results each option would produce.

    I selected the item numbered 6, under Step 5.
    Under Rufus configuration steps, this states "Under Boot selection, click/tap on the SELECT button, and navigate to and select your 64-bit Windows 10 ISO file."

    When I open and explore the files I downloaded in Step One, there is nothing named "ISO".
    There are all sorts of files and folders with obscure names.
    So, I'm stuck here:

    Create Bootable USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 10



    I don't have any friends to help, or money to pay a repair shop.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #13

    You wrote:

    "First I downloaded a win10 ISO file onto a USB drive".

    Did you attempt to "navigate to" it as stated in the step 6 instructions you mentioned above?

    Rufus is something of a complication. It "works", but option 1 (instead of option 2) can create a bootable USB drive without using Rufus. You may find option 1 simpler.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #14

    I don't know YOUR definition of "navigate to".

    What I did:

    1. Left Click Win7 Start;

    2. Left Click Devices and Printers

    3. Right Click Cruzer, the USB drive that is supposed to contain this thing.

    4. Highlight "Broswe Files" then click on "ESD-USB F"

    5. This shows a bunch of stuff that is total nonsense garbage to me. I don't know what any of these files or folders, or any of their many subfiles and subfolders, are or do.

    6. The Rufus utility is up on the desktop, and according to the instructions I press the SELECT button that is next to the "Boot Selection" Window.

    7. This brings up beatcat downloads, with a collossal number of folders, many of them zips, most of them I dont' remember what they are or where they came from.
    ZERO idea what to select.

    And THAT was where I was stuck. NOW, it seems I am NOT stuck, because:

    somehow managed to figure out how to reduce this mess down to showing me just things that were put in on THIS date.
    At least that is my best guess as to what I'm seeing.
    This is a list of gibberish named stuff, but at least three are listed under plain-english words "Disc Image File".
    I selected one, and Rufus appears to have accepted it.

    Now the long slog of the rest of the instructions is ahead of me.
    I hate how complex and NONintuitive all this is.

    put USB in old computer, turned on press F9 to select boot source, highlight USB, and get this error:

    ERROR: Legacy of Boot of UEFI Media
    This drive cqan onlly boot in UEFI mode.
    It cannot boot in BIOS/Legacy mode.

    If you want to boot this drive in BIOS/Legacy mode, you should recreate it in Rufus using the following settings:

    Partition scheme: MBR
    Target system > BIOS....
    then, showed a blinking cursor.

    Had to shut down manually.
    Deleted everything off the USB drive, put USB back in,

    Reconfigured Rufus and it copied ISO files.
    Installed USB in broken computer.
    Would not boot from USB using F8 or F9.
    Just went to locked up Blue Win Icon again.

    Rebooted, this time pressing DEL, and put the USB drive at the top of the list of boot devices.
    Restarted.
    Again, frozen on Blue Icon.

    Will not reboot from the USB when I leave all F keys alone.

    Well, I'm exhausted in every way. I've got to take a break from this for a few hours.
    Last edited by bearcat22; 17 Oct 2019 at 15:00.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,614
    Windows 10 Home
       #15

    I'm wondering if PowerISO would have been easier to navigate. Not having used rufus, having used PowerISO, I don't know one is better for OP. .
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #16

    Use option 1, avoiding Rufus completely. Not surprising you had trouble with it.

    Create Bootable USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 10



      My Computer


  7. Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #17

    ignatzatsonic said:
    Use option 1, avoiding Rufus completely. Not surprising you had trouble with it.

    Create Bootable USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 10



    used Option 1. This ALSO will not boot. Crashes to Blue Logo.

    Since what the Option 1 shows for screen shots does NOT match what I see on my screen, I presume I
    made a mistake. Will try to make the USB again.

    What would be helpful: tell me EXACTLY what my USB drive should look like BEFORE and AFTER.

    Right now it is BLANK, empty, after deleting unsuccessful material
    Please tell me in great detail the names of what it should contain AFTER this boot thing is created.

    Should I follow the Option 1 directions EXACTLY, or does MY situation differ?
    For example, step 6.
    It is being created on a Win7 machine, but will be USED on a Win10 machine.

    Which option is correct in Step 6, leave box checked, or Uncheck it?

    Update: Created USB again, with box left Checked, as step 6 requires. The USB created this way would NOT boot, back to locked Blue Logo.

    Will now try a THIRD time, UNchecking box in step 6.
    Last edited by bearcat22; 17 Oct 2019 at 20:58.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 34,922
    Win 10 Pro (1903) (2nd PC is 21H2)
       #18

    Regarding your DVD: 2 things have to be true:
    a. The DVD has to have been created correctly as a bootable DVD. E.g. if you look at it in explorer you should NOT see an iso file on it. (That would be a data disk- non bootable- as I mentioned above with the USB disk).

    Example on how to do this:
    How To Create Windows 10 Bootable DVD


    Please confirm you believe your DVD to be bootable.

    b. You need to tell your PC where to look first for where to boot from. By default this is your internal disk.
    If you have not changed this, you can create 10 bootable media and your PC will never use them, and you will continue to fail to boot.

    I mentioned this above when I said you had to change your boot priority- which disk your PC looks at first as a bootable source.

    How do you do this? You have to access your BIOS and change the setting.

    Accessing your BIOS (the first thing your PC uses in starting to boot) is different from one type of PC to another.
    We don't know your PC type (perhaps there's a label on the back?) so I can't look that up for you.

    For example, it is common to use either F2 or F7 repeatedly (not furiously!) just after you switch on the PC.

    Here I have done a Google search for you:
    how do I change boot priority

    Example: (your PC will look different)
    About Boot Priority (Boot from CD-ROM & USB Flash Drive)

    Post a photo showing you have changed your boot priority so your DVD drive is top of the list.
    To post a photo or screen shot please use the film icon above your post - you see 'Insert Image' when the mouse is over it
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #19

    dalchina said:
    Regarding your DVD: 2 things have to be true:
    a. The DVD has to have been created correctly as a bootable DVD. E.g. if you look at it in explorer you should NOT see an iso file on it. (That would be a data disk- non bootable- as I mentioned above with the USB disk).

    Example on how to do this:
    How To Create Windows 10 Bootable DVD


    Please confirm you believe your DVD to be bootable.

    b. You need to tell your PC where to look first for where to boot from. By default this is your internal disk.
    If you have not changed this, you can create 10 bootable media and your PC will never use them, and you will continue to fail to boot.

    I mentioned this above when I said you had to change your boot priority- which disk your PC looks at first as a bootable source.

    How do you do this? You have to access your BIOS and change the setting.

    Accessing your BIOS (the first thing your PC uses in starting to boot) is different from one type of PC to another.
    We don't know your PC type (perhaps there's a label on the back?) so I can't look that up for you.

    For example, it is common to use either F2 or F7 repeatedly (not furiously!) just after you switch on the PC.

    Here I have done a Google search for you:
    how do I change boot priority

    Example: (your PC will look different)
    About Boot Priority (Boot from CD-ROM & USB Flash Drive)

    Post a photo showing you have changed your boot priority so your DVD drive is top of the list.
    To post a photo or screen shot please use the film icon above your post - you see 'Insert Image' when the mouse is over it
    Dalchina, I previously followed your instructions to make a DVD boot disk.
    It did not work.
    I have just now looked at it's contents.
    There is a LOT there, all of it confusing, and for no good reason, a lot of it buried and hidden in sub folders.
    I did my very best to try to be sure to look at everything, but that is a very difficult task.
    At any rate, I did NOT see anything with ISO in the name.
    I tried booting with this disk again, and was able to get into BIOS and set priority to the CD/DVD drive.
    Nevertheless, it would not boot, just goes back to the same frozen screen with the Blue Windows Logo.

    So, I've been told that using option ONE is best, and tried that with a USB drive, and that has failed also.
    To say Im exhausted is an understatement. Each time, I have to switch the mouse antenna, keyboard and monitor connections back and forth between the old working computer and the new one that is dead.
    Then, there is the mental confusion, the intense anxiety.
    I appreciate your patience and help. But Every Word matters.

    If you type
    "option 1 or option 2"
    as an incomplete sentence, instead of saying, for example, "You can use either option 1 or option 2" there is an extremely high chance I will become anxious and confused.
    I am very simple minded, very literal minded.
    Please be careful, and please communicate with the people who are giving me advice that contradicts yours.

    Now I am going to go back, using your most recent posted link, make a fresh DVD, and try that again.

    - - - Updated - - -

    dalchina said:
    Regarding your DVD: 2 things have to be true:
    a. The DVD has to have been created correctly as a bootable DVD. E.g. if you look at it in explorer you should NOT see an iso file on it. (That would be a data disk- non bootable- as I mentioned above with the USB disk).

    Example on how to do this:
    How To Create Windows 10 Bootable DVD


    Please confirm you believe your DVD to be bootable.

    b. You need to tell your PC where to look first for where to boot from. By default this is your internal disk.
    If you have not changed this, you can create 10 bootable media and your PC will never use them, and you will continue to fail to boot.

    I mentioned this above when I said you had to change your boot priority- which disk your PC looks at first as a bootable source.

    How do you do this? You have to access your BIOS and change the setting.

    Accessing your BIOS (the first thing your PC uses in starting to boot) is different from one type of PC to another.
    We don't know your PC type (perhaps there's a label on the back?) so I can't look that up for you.

    For example, it is common to use either F2 or F7 repeatedly (not furiously!) just after you switch on the PC.

    Here I have done a Google search for you:
    how do I change boot priority

    Example: (your PC will look different)
    About Boot Priority (Boot from CD-ROM & USB Flash Drive)

    Post a photo showing you have changed your boot priority so your DVD drive is top of the list.
    To post a photo or screen shot please use the film icon above your post - you see 'Insert Image' when the mouse is over it
    Dalchina, I previously followed your instructions to make a DVD boot disk.
    It did not work.
    I have just now looked at it's contents.
    There is a LOT there, all of it confusing, and for no good reason, a lot of it buried and hidden in sub folders.
    I did my very best to try to be sure to look at everything, but that is a very difficult task.
    At any rate, I did NOT see anything with ISO in the name.
    I tried booting with this disk again, and was able to get into BIOS and set priority to the CD/DVD drive.
    Nevertheless, it would not boot, just goes back to the same frozen screen with the Blue Windows Logo.

    So, I've been told that using option ONE is best, and tried that with a USB drive, and that has failed also.
    To say Im exhausted is an understatement. Each time, I have to switch the mouse antenna, keyboard and monitor connections back and forth between the old working computer and the new one that is dead.
    Then, there is the mental confusion, the intense anxiety.
    I appreciate your patience and help. But Every Word matters.

    If you type
    "option 1 or option 2"
    as an incomplete sentence, instead of saying, for example, "You can use either option 1 or option 2" there is an extremely high chance I will become anxious and confused.
    I am very simple minded, very literal minded.
    Please be careful, and please communicate with the people who are giving me advice that contradicts yours.

    Now I am going to go back, using your most recent posted link, make a fresh DVD, and try that again.

    UPDATE---- Ok, already there is a problem. The link you provide leads to MULTIPLE METHODS, but you dont' specify which one to use. I am only able to use a functioning windows 7 computer to make a disk. That disk has to boot a Windows 10 machine. It is not clear to me which one to use on this page:
    How To Create Windows 10 Bootable DVD

    - - - Updated - - -

    UPDATE---- Ok, already there is a problem. The link you provide leads to MULTIPLE METHODS, but you dont' specify which one to use. I am only able to use a functioning windows 7 computer to make a disk. That disk has to boot a Windows 10 machine. It is not clear to me which one to use on this page:
    How To Create Windows 10 Bootable DVD

    - - - Updated - - -

    Dalchina,

    I suspect you might not understand. You wrote, "post a screenshot showing you have set the BIOS to boot from DVD".

    That is a paraphrase. It is IMPOSSIBLE to make any screen shot. While inside bios, even if I push the Print Screen button, unless I can boot in, which I cannot, I can't make Paint or anything else run to save the screen shot.

    To be crystal clear. I am forced to communicate with you, and can only work on, a windows 7 computer.
    The Windows 10 computer is unbootable.

    ***************

    This is a NIGHTMARE.......I went back to again create the DVD and make sure it is what you say it should be,
    but forgot what I told you before:

    The steps reach a point where there is a selection box. I will attempt to take a screen shot.
    I DO NOT KNOW OR UNDERSTAND whether to leave the box checked, or UNcheck it.
    Computer is frozen, won't accept input from keyboard or mouse-box.png
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 34,922
    Win 10 Pro (1903) (2nd PC is 21H2)
       #20

    Hi, as the very first steps towards beginning to rescue data from your system are unfortunately failing or too difficult for you, I can really only suggest the best way forward is to find someone to help, or follow the instructions from the company- your PC is under warranty, but I guess that applies to the hardware, rather than software support.

    Repair investigations can become significantly more technical, so it is unlikely success will follow.
      My Computers


 

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