Missing boot volume can't fix boot

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  1. Posts : 17,348
    Windows 11 Pro
       #11

    In your photo of your screen, it looks like your Windows partition was assigned D drive not C drive. That would make the bcdboot command:

    Code:
    bcdboot d:\Windows /s T:
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 15
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #12

    NavyLCDR said:
    In your photo of your screen, it looks like your Windows partition was assigned D drive not C drive. That would make the bcdboot command:

    Code:
    bcdboot d:\Windows /s T:
    Thank you for this. Since i could not get into the cmd prompt anymore i made a windows recovery USB. I did the commands this time making it D:\windows and that was successful.

    However, i still can't boot into the PC. I get the same screenshots as before. Still cannot press F1 for recovery.

    Suggestions?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 17,348
    Windows 11 Pro
       #13

    If you drive layout is the same as it was in the initial photo that you posted, the correct sequence of commands in a command prompt would be:

    Code:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    select part 2
    delete part override
    create part pri
    format fs=fat32 quick
    assign letter=t
    exit
    bcdboot D:\Windows /s T: /f ALL
    exit
    The partition that you want to select and delete is the 99 MB partition.
    The drive letter you want to use for Windows in the bcdboot command is whatever drive letter is assigned to the 445 or 446 GB partition (hard to see in the photo). You can run the list part and list vol commands after select disk 0 to verify the partition sizes and drive letters.

    Make sure your UEFI (BIOS) is booting from the proper hard drive. If all that fails, your Windows installation is corrupt and you'll have to do a clean install of Windows. Make sure you copy your important data files out of your existing Windows partition before you do the clean install.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 15
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #14

    NavyLCDR said:
    If you drive layout is the same as it was in the initial photo that you posted, the correct sequence of commands in a command prompt would be:

    Code:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    select part 2
    delete part override
    create part pri
    format fs=fat32 quick
    assign letter=t
    exit
    bcdboot D:\Windows /s T: /f ALL
    exit
    The partition that you want to select and delete is the 99 MB partition.
    The drive letter you want to use for Windows in the bcdboot command is whatever drive letter is assigned to the 445 or 446 GB partition (hard to see in the photo). You can run the list part and list vol commands after select disk 0 to verify the partition sizes and drive letters.

    Make sure your UEFI (BIOS) is booting from the proper hard drive. If all that fails, your Windows installation is corrupt and you'll have to do a clean install of Windows. Make sure you copy your important data files out of your existing Windows partition before you do the clean install.
    Confirmed all options are correct it still fails to boot just goes to that recovery screen.However, i am able to boot into safemode?

    - - - Updated - - -

    I'm not sure what happened, in safemode i couldn't run Antivirus, and i opened minitool parition wizard and just check each filesystem automatically fixing errors. Upon reboot it booted into my OS. I am concerned this may happen again, are there any checks i can do now to ensure my partition is OK ?
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 303
    Windows 10 (2), Win 8.1 (1), Win 7 (1)
       #15

    TC,

    Glad to see your are back up and running. It seems like a number of people are having this issue recently. A would suggest a couple of things:

    1. Now that you have Macrium Reflect, image your hard drive to an external drive regularly in case something nasty like this happens again. You can then restore it from a backup.

    2. I am not enamored with "Fast Startup". I feel that it is the cause of some strange happenings on PC's. When I first installed Windows 10 on a Lenovo laptop, I would use it for a while and shut it down normally and in some cases leave it unplugged. When I started it up the next day, the battery was almost totally depleted even though it had a good charge when I shut it down the previous day. If you use the standard shutdown icon to shut your system down, it is not totally shut down. It goes into a lower state that allows processes (including updates) to be run on PC's. I suggest shutting that off especially if you have a SSD drive. It will take a little longer for your system to boot and shutdown but I think it is worth it. This is my opinion. I am sure others will comment on it.

    JohnD
      My Computer


 

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