Create new taskbar toolbar

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  1. hello10's Avatar
    Posts : 204
    Windows 10 Home x64
       #11

    You can simply create a folder, where you store the shortcuts, and point to it as your Quick Launch. That way, you don't have to search for info on %UserProfile%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch (or memorize this?) every time the toolbar gets lost.
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  2. Posts : 18
    Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
       #12

    bbinnard said:
    dalchina is correct - STablauncher is simply exquisite. I found it (by accident) a couple of years ago and it is far better than all the others I tried before that. It is no longer being developed, but that's OK - it is perfect just the way it is.

    I did send an email to the developers a few months ago and they said they would fix any problems that might get reported. But there haven't been any in a very long while.
    Bbinnard: Pardon my stupid question, but how do you use this program? I downloaded & installed it; it placed an icon on my desktop. I clicked on it and nothing happened. I've got .NET Framework 2.0 enabled as the web site indicates. I tried uninstalling it (uninstaller said it needed to stop it first so I guess it was doing something) and reinstalling it; no luck. Windows 10-64 1809.

    Rob
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  3. Edwin's Avatar
    Posts : 17,150
    Windows 10
       #13

    OldMainframeGuy said:
    Bbinnard: Pardon my stupid question, but how do you use this program? I downloaded & installed it; it placed an icon on my desktop. I clicked on it and nothing happened. I've got .NET Framework 2.0 enabled as the web site indicates. I tried uninstalling it (uninstaller said it needed to stop it first so I guess it was doing something) and reinstalling it; no luck. Windows 10-64 1809.

    Rob
    If you click on the shortcut, the application should be hanging, somewhat translucent, at the top of your main screen,

    right clicking on the UI will give you all options including Exit...

    Create new taskbar toolbar-001449.png
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  4. Posts : 18
    Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
       #14

    Edwin said:
    If you click on the shortcut, the application should be hanging, somewhat translucent, at the top of your main screen,

    right clicking on the UI will give you all options including Exit...

    Create new taskbar toolbar-001449.png
    Edwin: Many thanks!!! I've got Stardock's Fences running on my PC and the Fences area on the desktop was obscuring the sTabLauncher application. I moved the "fences" and now I can see it.

    Rob
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  5. Posts : 334
    Win10 Ver. 1809 Build 17763.`
       #15

    OldMainframeGuy: I'm glad you got it figured out. I used StarDocks docking app (I forgot the name) before I found STablauncher. Here's an image of what my current setup looks like:

    Create new taskbar toolbar-screenshot_02.jpg

    I found STablauncher to be much easier to use and customize than the Stardocks one.

    PS: I've got a number of 360/75 stories if you're interested.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 18
    Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
       #16

    bbinnard said:
    OldMainframeGuy: I'm glad you got it figured out. I used StarDocks docking app (I forgot the name) before I found STablauncher. Here's an image of what my current setup looks like:

    Create new taskbar toolbar-screenshot_02.jpg

    I found STablauncher to be much easier to use and customize than the Stardocks one.

    PS: I've got a number of 360/75 stories if you're interested.
    Wow...had to look up 360/75...that's a model I wasn't familiar with. My first experience was System/360-50 at school running RAX (what's that?) on IBM 2741 terminals in 1969. Fast forward to 2018, now supporting a financial institution on z/14s running z/OS. You must have been in a huge organization to be running a Model 75 back in those days; there weren't too many sold and I can't imagine what they must have cost to buy or lease. I imagine you were running MVT.

    Share some of your stories!

    As for Stardock's Fences, I'm only running it because I bought it (Ashampoo was practically giving it away during one of their many fire sales) and I don't exactly find it useful but it's on my desktop nevertheless.

    Rob
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 334
    Win10 Ver. 1809 Build 17763.`
       #17

    Yup, back then I worked in the aerospace industry and at that time the place I worked for had the highest powered datacenter in the US - outside of the spook shops. I was a system programmer on the 75. It was the fastest computer on the planet then, primarily because it was the only 360 that had hardwired instructions. All the other models were microcoded. We ran sysgens for the 75 on a Mod 50 overnight- they took hours to run.

    The 75 had 1 MB of "internal" memory. That was considered huge at the time of course. But the engineering people needed to run more FEM routines (don't they always?) and said they needed more memory to do this. So I found out IBM offered something called LCS (Large Core Storage) that came in 1 and 2 MB sizes. My management didn't like the IBM price (of course) so I had to buy "compatible" memory from a 3rd party. So I got 2 MB for $2 million which actually worked ok. Of course the $2 million was billed back to the DOD, which means we all paid for it.

    For similar reasons I also had to buy a couple of strings of 3rd party 2311 disk drives - 16 drives in total. They basically worked ok, but from time to time they encountered a timing mismatch with the 75 which left it in a disabled loop. IPLing the 75 took about a half hour which the engineers complained about. So after a couple of these incidents I went through the memory dumps and found out I could use the toggle switches on the 75's console to find the address of the memory bit that said "I am the busy drive" and then use different toggles to switch that bit from 1 to 0. This let the system continue without the need to restart. When the operators saw this the first time they thought I was some sort of magician. But after that they always called me to get them going when the system locked them out.
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  8. Posts : 18
    Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
       #18

    bbinnard said:
    Yup, back then I worked in the aerospace industry and at that time the place I worked for had the highest powered datacenter in the US - outside of the spook shops. I was a system programmer on the 75. It was the fastest computer on the planet then, primarily because it was the only 360 that had hardwired instructions. All the other models were microcoded. We ran sysgens for the 75 on a Mod 50 overnight- they took hours to run.

    The 75 had 1 MB of "internal" memory. That was considered huge at the time of course. But the engineering people needed to run more FEM routines (don't they always?) and said they needed more memory to do this. So I found out IBM offered something called LCS (Large Core Storage) that came in 1 and 2 MB sizes. My management didn't like the IBM price (of course) so I had to buy "compatible" memory from a 3rd party. So I got 2 MB for $2 million which actually worked ok. Of course the $2 million was billed back to the DOD, which means we all paid for it.

    For similar reasons I also had to buy a couple of strings of 3rd party 2311 disk drives - 16 drives in total. They basically worked ok, but from time to time they encountered a timing mismatch with the 75 which left it in a disabled loop. IPLing the 75 took about a half hour which the engineers complained about. So after a couple of these incidents I went through the memory dumps and found out I could use the toggle switches on the 75's console to find the address of the memory bit that said "I am the busy drive" and then use different toggles to switch that bit from 1 to 0. This let the system continue without the need to restart. When the operators saw this the first time they thought I was some sort of magician. But after that they always called me to get them going when the system locked them out.
    That brings back memories...I once worked in a very decrepit shop (old factory building) in the 80s where the only piece of IBM equipment in the room was the CPU itself; Cambridge Memory memory; Raytheon terminals; StorageTek DASD and tape, etc. Machine checks daily with vendors pointing fingers at each other. We moved the whole data center to a shiny new building along with a shiny new processor - IBM 3031 with all IBM peripherals. A 3031 is absolutely puny by today's standards but it ran like a top.

    Thanks for sharing your memories. Sometimes the good old days weren't so good.

    Rob
      My Computer

  9. Ztruker's Avatar
    Posts : 13,512
    Windows 10 Pro X64 20H4 19042.746
       #19

    I was a tech at IBM and worked on the 3031 in Poughkeepsie NY, from power on to final test. It was a good system. The clock cycle was 115NS and it ran MVS and VM/370.

    Ah, the good old days. My phone has more power and storage than all the 3031s IBM built combined. Progress is amazing.
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 18
    Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
       #20

    Ztruker said:
    I was a tech at IBM and worked on the 3031 in Poughkeepsie NY, from power on to final test. It was a good system. The clock cycle was 115NS and it ran MVS and VM/370.

    Ah, the good old days. My phone has more power and storage than all the 3031s IBM built combined. Progress is amazing.
    Wow...a lot of us mainframe veterans are still around. Coincidentally, we're taking a road trip to Poughkeepsie in January to visit IBM for some burning topics - high availability, zLinux, pervasive encryption, Java on z/OS...stuff that probably wasn't even on the drawing board in the 303x days.

    The 3031 was a fine machine; it never gave us a moment's heartache. Ours never had the honor of running MVS or VM/370 though; we were blissfully happy in our little DOS/VSE world.

    I often wonder if IBM is sorry it ever broke the System/360 operating systems into OS/MFT, OS/MVT, DOS, TOS, PCP, etc. Apparently the smallest System/360s (like maybe the Model 20) didn't have the horsepower to run OS but I always wondered if they should have worked on watered-down versions of OS than creating basically incompatible operating systems. Their support model over the years may have been a bit easier...but what do I know?

    And to your comment that your smartphone is more powerful than all the 3031s IBM ever built, today we can run OS/VS2 MVS 3.8J right on our PCs thanks to projects like TurnkeyMVS ...just for nostalgia's sake of course.

    Rob
      My Computer


 
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