Windows 10: Windows 10 crashed after update and is now unbootable Solved

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  1.    1 Week Ago #1

    Windows 10 crashed after update and is now unbootable


    A 32-bit Windows 10 1803 installation crashed yesterday afternoon, apparently when an update went awry. Afterwards, attempting to boot results in an Automatic Repair which always fails. I used a recovery command prompt to chkdsk /r /x, which found some corrupted files, and sfc /scannow, which found no problems. Still, it won't boot.

    I have tried using restore points from the recovery console command prompt, to no avail. (The restore point fails when restoring the registry, with an error code of 0x80070002.)

    Is there any other recourse short of reinstallation? Is Windows 10 really this fragile that a single update can render it unusable?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    1 Week Ago #2

    Hi, if you're very lucky, if you were to restore the backup copy of the registry which Windows should be automatically creating, you might be able to boot.

    However, that could well create an inconsistency between the build state and the registry, perhaps depending on what exactly happened during the course of the failed update (did it change any files).

    Yes, anything can and will happen and you need to take due precautions, unfortunately. Disks fail, corruption occurs, software isn't perfect, and Windows tries to survive whilst still being a right mishmash of OS and user programs, drivers and files.

    System Restore is often commented on here as being problematic and unreliable in restoring.

    Disk imaging is something we regard as essential for most users (Macrium reflect (free) + external storage) - and would have helped you in this instance to restore your PC to a previous working state without technical help.

    ==============
    Replacing the current registry with the backup copy.

    The Windows 10 backup copy of the registry is normally under:
    C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack
    as you can see from the illustration below.

    Boot up the PC using either


    1. Kyhi’s bootable Win 10 disk available from the top of tenforums Software and Apps section.

    (This lets you use file explorer - easier)
    or (if you are familiar with using the command prompt:

    1. Boot your PC from a Win 10 installation disk, and via Repair Your computer, navigate to a command prompt.


    Carefully identify the drive letter for the Windows partition - this will probably not now be C:

    I’ll call it Z in this example.

    Back up the files under Z:\Windows\System32\config

    Copy all files under Z:\Windows\System32\Config\RegBack to Z:\Windows\System32\config

    (You may wish to delete the files in Z:\Windows\System32\config first)
    Click image for larger version. 

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      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    1 Week Ago #3

    dalchina said: View Post
    Hi, if you're very lucky, if you were to restore the backup copy of the registry which Windows should be automatically creating, you might be able to boot.
    Good to know!


    However, that could well create an inconsistency between the build state and the registry, perhaps depending on what exactly happened during the course of the failed update (did it change any files).
    I was thinking that.

    Yes, anything can and will happen and you need to take due precautions, unfortunately. Disks fail, corruption occurs, software isn't perfect, and Windows tries to survive whilst still being a right mishmash of OS and user programs, drivers and files.
    This has a brand-new hard drive and a chkdsk run indicates no bad sectors, while sfc reports no problems with system files.

    This is one of three PCs which have worked yeoman duty for eleven or so years, and the first time one of them has failed in such a manner. I'm wondering if it's due to the crusty old power supply (which has overheated and sustained damage in the past) not being able to handle the E8500 CPU I installed on the weekend?

    System Restore is often commented on here as being problematic and unreliable in restoring.
    That is scary.

    Disk imaging is something we regard as essential for most users (Macrium reflect (free) + external storage) - and would have helped you in this instance to restore your PC to a previous working state without technical help.
    You can't be imaging the disk after before update (which sneak in), can you? And this is the first time in eleven years the machine has failed.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    1 Week Ago #4

    You can't be imaging the disk after before update (which sneak in), can you? And this is the first time in eleven years the machine has failed.
    Yes I can- as I have Pro (upgraded from a £40 Win 8 license which I got obviously planning for this...) I can set updates to Notfiy, and defer feature updates (upgrades).

    Thus when updates/upgrades are applied is up to me.

    In any event you create a base image, and differential images (smaller, faster) either manually or on a schedule. That could be daily, weekly- whatever you feel comfortable with.

    With Home, the options are more limited/problematic. To get control of updates you have
    - Active Hours (restarts)
    - and e.g. a 3rd party tool to block updates. (search forum: block updates completely)

    You can then use another 3rd party tool to scan for and apply updates manually. (Windows Update Minitool).

    Hmm, messy isn't it?

    And this is the first time in eleven years the machine has failed.
    It takes just one unfortunate event or combination to render Windows unbootable.

    For example, my first Win 10 upgrade failed badly- unbootable- because of a particular program I had installed.

    Note that in your case you can't do an in-place upgrade repair install as you have to be booted normally to do that.

    Disk failure does happen- I've been in maybe 10 threads this year where it turned out a drive was failing badly.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    1 Week Ago #5

    dalchina said: View Post
    In any event you create a base image, and differential images (smaller, faster) either manually or on a schedule. That could be daily, weekly- whatever you feel comfortable with.
    Interesting but sounds complicated.
    It takes just one unfortunate event or combination to render Windows unbootable.
    In this case, given that the hard drive was brand new (and remains in good condition), what might have caused this problem? A crash due to the flaky power supply?
    For example, my first Win 10 upgrade failed badly- unbootable- because of a particular program I had installed.
    I was always able to roll back. Always. And I must have done over a hundred of these over the years, both 32- and 64-bit.
    Disk failure does happen- I've been in maybe 10 threads this year where it turned out a drive was failing badly.
    Yes, but the disk does not appear to be at fault in this case. Usually they degrade slowly, like the eleven-year-old unit this one (Western Digital Blue 1tb) was replacing. For that matter, the eleven-year-old one still has its image intact, less a few bad sectors. I plan to dd an image file tonight when I get home.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    1 Week Ago #6

    All the files in Regback are zero bytes in length. That nixes that idea.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 20,793
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       1 Week Ago #7

    After using Kyhi boot rescue if you have backed up all of the important files you can perform a clean install and restore the files.
    How to Perform a Clean Install or Reinstall of Windows 10 - Microsoft Community

    If you want to continue troubleshooting these are steps with a bootable windows 10 iso.

    Some of the steps below may repeat earlier steps.
    Please use a camera or smartphone camera to take pictures and post images of the commands and images into the thread)

    1) Create a bootable Windows 10 iso:
    Download Windows 10

    2) Power on the computer and click the applicable F Key or temporarily modify the bios boot order to boot to the external USB HD
    List of PC brands with their corresponding hot-keys

    3) It may take 5 - 10 minutes for the iso to load while viewing the Microsoft Windows icon

    4) Select language, time, currency, and keyboard, or click next

    5) In the left lower click repair your computer (do not click install)

    6) Click troubleshoot

    7) Click startup repair (this is expected to fail; if it produces an srttrail.txt file then open file explorer > file > open > find the file > save to the flash drive > later move the drive to another computer and post the srttrail.txt into the thread using a share link (one drive, drop box, google drive)

    8) Click system restore (start with the oldest restore point and keep repeating to the most recent restore point) (if all restore points fail or if there are no restore points move to the next step)

    9) Click command prompt > this should open a black box with title bar: Administrator: X:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe and prompt: X:\Sources> type these commands (comments will be in partenthesis)

    (Use a camera or smart phone camera to take pictures and post images of the commands and the results into the thread)

    10) bcdedit /enum
    11) bcdedit | find "osdevice"
    12) diskpart
    13) list disk
    14) list volume
    15) select disk 0
    16) list partition
    17) select partition 1
    18) detail partition
    19) select partition 2
    20) detail partition
    21) select partition 3
    22) detail partition
    23) select partition 4
    24) detail partition
    25) (if there are any additional partition continue in the same fashion)
    26) select disk 1
    27) detail disk
    28) list partition
    29) select partition 1
    30) detail partition
    31) (if there are any additional partitions continue in the same fashion)
    32) exit

    33) dism /image:M:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions
    (replace M with the drive letter for the partition displayed in step #11)
    (there is a space between \ and /)

    34) (reboot and reopen command prompt if it does not boot to desktop)

    35) chkdsk /r M: (change the drive letter M to the partition drive letter from step #11)
    (This may take time to complete. If the command is able to proceed it typically will display an ETA)
    36) (reboot as necessary)

    37) (reopen command prompt)

    38) sfc /scannow /offbootdir=M:\ /offwindir=M:\windows
    (change the drive letter M to the partition drive letter seen in step # 11)

    39) bootrec /fixmbr
    40) bootrec /fixboot
    41) bootrec /scanos
    42) bootrec /rebuildbcd
    43) (reboot and reopen command prompt if it does not boot to desktop)

    44) C:
    45) dir
    46) D:
    47) dir
    48) (view the dir for each drive letter and select the drive letter that has the windows files on the computer.
    (The proper drive will display: perflogs, program files, program files (x86), users, windows, etc,)
    49) cd \windows\system32\config
    50) dir
    51) (It should display: bbi, bcd-template, components, default, drivers, elam, sam, security, software, system, vsmidk, journal, regback, systemprofile txr, etc.)
    52) (for all steps please use a camera or smart phone camera to take pictures and post images of the commands and the results into the thread)
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    1 Week Ago #8

    Interesting but sounds complicated.
    It's all managed by the program.
    To start a differential image for a particular image task you right click on the backup job definition and click 'Differential'. 3 clicks.

    The number of differential images kept on disk is also managed automatically.

    So you first set up what you want to image, where you want to store the images - allocate names- and choose parameters like compression, scheduling, number of images to be kept. That creates the task definition which is stored. Then you start the creation of the base image.

    Thereafter, plug in storage disk, launch Macrium, 3 clicks, wait for job to finish (can still use PC).

    ============================
    Regback: that's a shame. That could have given you a way out.

    I found the relevant scheduled task was disabled some time back. I'm now wondering if this is a choice MS has made surreptitiously.

    See:
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    when the opportunity arises and your system is running again and make sure it's enabled.
    @zbook - is yours enabled?

    Here's mine just to show it works:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Otherwise, looks like zbook has again taken over, so I wish you good luck.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  9. Posts : 20,793
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       1 Week Ago #9

    The comments that were made were in addition those made dalchina so follow the steps that were outlined.
    The comments that were made were only if you wanted to try additional troubleshooting steps.
    They are command line steps as compared to windows steps.

    For the registry backup via task scheduler a computer with windows 1703 displayed 9/26/2018; one with 1803 displayed 9/27/2018 and the one that was upgraded to 1809 displayed: 11/30/1999 (not yet run)

    None of these were scheduled.

    There were no default settings modified after the upgrade to 1809:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Using Macrium the backup is an extra layer of protection.
    Dalchina, what schedule modifications did you make for the computers?
    If there is a computer that is not using a backup image what alternative schedule do you recommend?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    1 Week Ago #10

    For what it's worth, I backed up the old hard drive (which had been in use for ten, not eleven, years) using Acronis TrueImage and restored the backup to an SSD.


    Using the guide elsewhere on this site, I disabled Automatic Repair on the failing installation and booted it. Windows failed to start, with a 0xC0000225 error code (corrupted registry).

    Having established that a corrupted registry was at fault, I installed the SSD (with the restored image) in the machine as the boot drive, leaving the hard drive (with the corrupted installation) installed as a secondary. I booted to Windows 10, navigated to <oldwindir>\system32\config on the hard drive and renamed the five Registry files. I then copied over the five Registry files from <windir>\system32\config (on the restored installation) as replacements for the corrupted files, and rebooted.

    Lo and behold, the system booted. I launched System Restore and found that two (no longer five) restore points were available, and selected the oldest one. It is currently restoring the Registry, and hopefully the process will conclude successfully.

    I'll post back with the results either way.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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