Windows 10: Display Shutdown Event Tracker? Where is it?

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  1.    2 Weeks Ago #21

    EdTittel said: View Post
    If you can run your laptop from the wall socket continuously, you can remove the battery completely. Until you get a replacement (highly recommended!) I'd suggest this as a possible strategy to see if you can avoid the power/availability issues you've been experiencing.
    I actually do keep it plugged in pretty much 24-7, as I rarely use it outside of the house, just if we travel more than a day or so. But wouldn't that mean that the battery effectively isn't being used? If not, why would it be affected?

    EdTittel said: View Post
    Years ago, Tom's Hardware recommended that for laptops left constantly plugged in, it's better to discharge the battery to 40% capacity, then store it in double ZipLocs in the refrigerator to keep it from deteriorating (I translated this article from German into English, actually).
    Interesting. I've heard this too, loosely anyway, no percentages.

    EdTittel said: View Post
    After a full charge-up when re-inserted into the laptop (or a secondary charger) this is supposed to help ensure maximum battery life. I can't find that article anymore so that advice may be passe (I don't follow it myself, either; I just replace my batteries when their relative capacity drops below 80% of the factory-original rating).
    I'm looking at it now, and it says it's at 100%. This after about 5 years when it may have actually been on battery maybe the equivalent of a week or two. How is "relative capacity" detected?

    TIA
    elaine
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    2 Weeks Ago #22

    It's relatively easy to get Windows itself to report on remaining battery capacity (aka "battery life"). Open an administrative cmd.exe or PowerShell session, then paste this string into the prompt line:
    Code:
    powercfg /batteryreport /output "C:\battery_report.html"
    After this runs (it's quick!), you can exit the cmd.exe or PowerShell session, then open the battery_report.html file in your favorite Web browser. In Chrome, it looks like this:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	batreport.jpg 
Views:	7 
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ID:	174759
    Notice the lines at the bottom of the output page. They provide Windows' best (and a reasonably accurate) guess as to remaining battery life. When the percentage under the "Capacity Remaining" header drops close to 80%, I start looking for a good battery deal. I'm on my 2nd battery for both of my Lenovos, after purchasing them in late 2012/early 2013, so it's not something you need to do all that often.
    HTH,
    --Ed--
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.png  
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 18,834
    Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17083
       2 Weeks Ago #23

    eppack said: View Post
    I actually do keep it plugged in pretty much 24-7, as I rarely use it outside of the house, just if we travel more than a day or so. But wouldn't that mean that the battery effectively isn't being used? If not, why would it be affected?

    <Snip>

    TIA
    elaine
    Good morning, Elaine.

    My daughter and I both have ruined batteries by leaving the laptop plugged in 24/7. It's just not good for the battery and will make it fail down the line. Of course, this may not hold true for newer batteries, but I still make it a point to unplug and keep my laptop in its case when not in use. I haven't lost a battery since.

    Here's a link that will tell you a bit about batteries and how to care for same:

    Laptop Battery Care - How to extend the life of your laptop battery
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    2 Weeks Ago #24

    Helpful resource, Wynona! Thanks for posting. I've added it to my Favorites under the Laptops heading.
    --Ed--
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  5.    2 Weeks Ago #25

    Ed, I ran that report (VERY helpful, btw, didn't even know about it!) I've uploaded it here: Battery report Interesting tho, it shows as 100% capacity remaining, and the battery usage pretty much matches trips we've made. Interestingly too, even tho I'm a 100% admin on my machine, it made me run it as admin. Guess Windows wants to be extra specially sure you really really really want to do something

    That all said, to Wynona's point, I totally do not disagree, but FMI how does a battery go bad if it's not used at all? Luckily as I said, I DO have it on battery from time to time, but not all THAT much.

    Thanks to both of you!
    elaine
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    2 Weeks Ago #26

    Batteries degrade over time as the electrolyte (or equivalent) loses its oomph and as the positive and negative poles inevitably develop corrosion and their ability to conduct electricity degrades. It's the battery equivalent of aging: we don't remain as flexible and strong as we were in our primes, either!
    I usually get 2-3 years out of my laptop batteries on heavily used machines, and seldom keep one more than 5 years so I really can't tell you if they do or don't last long than that!
    HTH,
    --Ed--
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 18,834
    Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17083
       2 Weeks Ago #27

    eppack said: View Post
    Ed, I ran that report (VERY helpful, btw, didn't even know about it!) I've uploaded it here: Battery report Interesting tho, it shows as 100% capacity remaining, and the battery usage pretty much matches trips we've made. Interestingly too, even tho I'm a 100% admin on my machine, it made me run it as admin. Guess Windows wants to be extra specially sure you really really really want to do something

    That all said, to Wynona's point, I totally do not disagree, but FMI how does a battery go bad if it's not used at all? Luckily as I said, I DO have it on battery from time to time, but not all THAT much.

    Thanks to both of you!
    elaine
    Good morning, Elaine.

    Think of that flashlight sitting on the shelf for a few months. You take it down to use it one dark night, and it won't work. You open the battery compartment only to find that the batteries are all corroded. Put simply, batteries die from disuse. What Ed said!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    2 Weeks Ago #28

    Even if they aren't being used? I mean, I do understand entropy, guess that's what it is?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    2 Weeks Ago #29

    Ah, that I do understand, Wynona! Thanks! I've always been software, not hardware

    Is the battery the only piece of hardware that is susceptible to heat issues? Stuff that might be causing the original reported issue? So far as I can tell, once I removed BOINC, I haven't had any unexplained restarts.

    So the upshot is that even tho it's so rarely used, apparently the fact it is throwing at least SOME kind of heat related issues, it may well be time to swap it?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  10. Posts : 18,834
    Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17083
       2 Weeks Ago #30

    eppack said: View Post
    Ah, that I do understand, Wynona! Thanks! I've always been software, not hardware

    Is the battery the only piece of hardware that is susceptible to heat issues? Stuff that might be causing the original reported issue? So far as I can tell, once I removed BOINC, I haven't had any unexplained restarts.

    So the upshot is that even tho it's so rarely used, apparently the fact it is throwing at least SOME kind of heat related issues, it may well be time to swap it?
    And I'm the hardware one ... I love building computers and adding stuff to existing ones.

    From everything you've posted so far, and (whatever BOINC is) removing BOINC seems to have cured the issue, I'd hold off on replacing anything.

    I would suggest that maybe once a week or so, that you unplug the computer while you're using it and let the battery drain until it starts warning you. Then you can plug it in and continue on with what you're doing.

    Sometimes software can cause issues with hardware. Those issues are hardest to diagnose. But, just maybe, you've cured your own problem. Give it some time ...
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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