Windows 10: Do I need to Wipe/Erase my SSD Partition after removing Bit-locker

  1.    3 Weeks Ago #1

    Do I need to Wipe/Erase my SSD Partition after removing Bit-locker


    I own SanDisk 256gb SSD, It has 2 Partitions C: for Windows & D: for my personal data. I have encrypted Drive D: with Bitlocker in Win 10.

    Now for the purpose of resale should I completely Wipe Partition C & D (so that purchaser couldn't recover any of my files) or it is impossible to recovery as it was having Encryption ? Thanks
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2.    3 Weeks Ago #2

    Most normal computer people cannot recover files off of a formatted drive.
    Because the drive was encrypted, the files will no longer be accessible if the drive is formatted and they do not have the password
    If you are paranoid, wiping the drive is a good idea.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3.    3 Weeks Ago #3

    You assume every computer person is "normal". That assumption is what allows hackers to hide in plain site. Anyway the OP intends to sell the drive and may not have an idea of who's going to buy it, thus their security concerns do matter and they are not being "paranoid".

    That said, I'm not sure how Bit Blocker works with regards to needing to wipe the drive after the drive has been removed from the affected machine. In short, I don't have the answer as to whether the drive actually needs further wiping.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4.    3 Weeks Ago #4

    If it's that much of a concern, just run something like MiniTool Partition Wizard and select wipe drive. Remember we are talking about an SSD here - an SSD is much harder to use forensics to recover data on than a traditional HDD. You can even do it with MiniTool Partition Wizard installed on the drive you are about to erase, it will reboot the computer, load itself into memory, and then wipe the system drive.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Capture.JPG 
Views:	24 
Size:	38.2 KB 
ID:	119420

    Recovering Evidence from SSD Drives in 2014: Understanding TRIM, Garbage Collection and Exclusions | Forensic Focus - Articles
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5.    3 Weeks Ago #5

    My question to you, NavyLCDR - is this really necessary being the drive "was" previously encrypted with Bit Blocker?

    Just curious.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6.    3 Weeks Ago #6

    sygnus21 said: View Post
    You assume every computer person is "normal". That assumption is what allows hackers to hide in plain site. Anyway the OP intends to sell the drive and may not have an idea of who's going to buy it, thus their security concerns do matter and they are not being "paranoid".

    That said, I'm not sure how Bit Blocker works with regards to needing to wipe the drive after the drive has been removed from the affected machine. In short, I don't have the answer as to whether the drive actually needs further wiping.
    Hi there

    My own take on this is that if you are that paranoid (no disrespect here -- these days you never can be too careful with computers) is that you should re-format the drive and then use one of those programs that writes X'00' (Hex zeros) to every data area on the HDD / SSD. If you are using Windows then NavyLcdr's post is good too.

    If I'm repairing anybody's computer that's had a virus on it for a start I boot up their machine with a Linux distro from a USB, reformat the HDD with Linux EXT4 (mkfs.ext4 command) and do my erase with X'00' before re-formatting the drive with NTFS and recovering Windows. The Linux "secure erase" utilities are a zillion times faster than the Windows ones - also re-formatting the HDD / SSD with ext4 (only takes a few seconds even on large TB HDD's) gives another level of "deletion" so doubly secure.

    Note - people like CIA / Mossad / Police etc can often decrypt things like Bitlocker from domestic machines -- commercial military grade encryption is obviously (or hopefully !!!) much harder to break.

    Personally I'd rather DONATE an old / unwanted computer to some organisation that needs it rather than sell it on the open market - but that's an individuals choice.

    As for relying on a Used HDD / SSD for "production" or everyday running machines - I'd never buy one -- although for using in a test lab / making backup copies of data it's probably OK though - I've loads of 2.5 inch HDD's from old laptops etc - these are useful for all sorts of purposes.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7.    3 Weeks Ago #7

    First and foremost I'm always the one telling people if their that paranoid they shouldn't be using electronic devices. In short I DON'T subscribe to the tin-hat society! Now that that's out the way - Just because one wants to practice sound security measures doesn't make one paranoid. I think a bit of common sense is in order here.

    If the measure isn't required, it isn't required. I think that's what the OP is asking. And also what I asked. No one is being paranoid here.

    Anyway, when I trash a hard drive I'll drill a hole through it. And the only people who get my old hard drives are family members, but this is after a simple reformat and OS install. Were I to sell a drive to say a stranger, I might take more secure measures in wiping the drive. That's me. Anyway that doesn't make one paranoid, that makes them security conscious.

    All locks do is keep honest men honest, an thief will find a way if they want it bad enough. Thus you can't go through life worrying.

    Peace
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8.    2 Weeks Ago #8

    jimbo45 said: View Post
    Note - people like CIA / Mossad / Police etc can often decrypt things like Bitlocker from domestic machines -- commercial military grade encryption is obviously (or hopefully !!!) much harder to break.
    FYI, your military grade encryption is what Bitlocker uses. AES is the encryption scheme the US government uses to encrypt confidential information. Currently it is not possible to decrypt AES using any brute force means. Instead other means of obtaining the key are used. The weakness of the encryption is the key and how well you guard it.

    Your military grade encryption can easily be broken, if you posted-note the password nearby for example. That is how they get around the encryption.

    The only way to decrypt Bitlocker is by getting access to the key.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9.    2 Weeks Ago #9

    sygnus21 said: View Post
    My question to you, NavyLCDR - is this really necessary being the drive "was" previously encrypted with Bit Blocker?

    Just curious.
    I would say no, so long as you deleted the partitions without decrypting them.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10.    2 Weeks Ago #10

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    I would say no, so long as you deleted the partitions without decrypting them.
    Thank you.

    Peace
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


 

Related Threads
Disable PRE-boot Bit-locker timeout in AntiVirus, Firewalls and System Security
I have had this problem before. The Pre-boot bit locker password randomly times out, sometime immediately after boot, sometime while I was typing the password. I found a solution to disable the timeout so it stays on the password page indefinitely....
We have a document scanner that was attached to a new Windows 10 PC BEFORE the manufacturer's drivers were installed. We have yet to capture a single scan. It stops midway through and after a long time of waiting, an error message appears saying...
Solved Secure Erase SSD Samsung in Drivers and Hardware
I have a samsung SSD and a PNY SSD that I installed on my laptop. I get an error and fix complete when I boot up windows 10. I was told I should do a secure erase and reinstall windows 10. I have tired using samsung magician and make bootable USB...
How can I erase win7 marker in SLIC? in Installation and Setup
Hi all, I installed Windows 10 dvd on an old notebook which was running vista(it means I cleaned the hard disk and installed Windows 10 dvd). However win 10 has a minor problems. I'm an insider, so I checked build 10240 and 10547(upgraded last...
Encryption of personal files with CTB-Locker in AntiVirus, Firewalls and System Security
https://www.pcrisk.com/removal-guides/8120-your-personal-files-are-encrypted-virus So my friend has this problem and i would like to give him good advice. Anyone here that had this problem before? My friend is on Windows 10. Thanks
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 18:09.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums