Windows 10: Problem with SSD Solved

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  1. Posts : 10
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       02 Jan 2017 #1

    Problem with SSD


    Firstly Happy New Year everybody!
    My question!I install new SSD disk on my desktop computer Windows 10 x64.I migrate my OS to this.I see new drive in Windows Explorer but this not booting.Maybe problem in BIOS?There are only two things,my current disk and optiarc and i don't set SSD first boot.What i can do to boot throw my new SSD drive?I want this is my general disk and second is data disk!Excuse my bad english!Thanks!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    02 Jan 2017 #2

    Hi,
    Go to BIOS, move your SSD to first boot position( move with arrow keys or any buttons dedicated for your PC) and try.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 10
    Windows 10 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       02 Jan 2017 #3

    brummyfan said: View Post
    Hi,
    Go to BIOS, move your SSD to first boot position( move with arrow keys or any buttons dedicated for your PC) and try.
    Thank you for fast answer but my SSD in BIOS invisible!Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	115650Only in Windows Explorer
    Last edited by Egrupov; 02 Jan 2017 at 11:33.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    02 Jan 2017 #4

    What type of interface is the SSD? Is it just a standard SATA like the hard drive and optical drive are plugged into, or is it M.2? If it is SATA, you might want to try plugging the new SSD into the first SATA port (0 or 1), the optical drive into the next higher one, and your current hard drive/SSD into the next higher port.

    If the new SSD is the M.2 interface type (which I have never used), your motherboard may require a driver to be loaded at boot time to enable the M.2 interface which means you will have to boot from SATA hard drive/SSD even the OS can be on the M.2 SSD. I think, but not certain.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    02 Jan 2017 #5

    You could also try backing up your C drive to an external*HDD, create a recovery disk using Macrium Reflect and restore the image to new SSD.
    Create a Windows PE Rescue Environment
    v5: How to create a disk image (Backup, Image, v5)
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 10
    Windows 10 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       03 Jan 2017 #6

    My SSD is Crucial SSD SATA 275GB MX300!
    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    What type of interface is the SSD? Is it just a standard SATA like the hard drive and optical drive are plugged into, or is it M.2? If it is SATA, you might want to try plugging the new SSD into the first SATA port (0 or 1), the optical drive into the next higher one, and your current hard drive/SSD into the next higher port.

    If the new SSD is the M.2 interface type (which I have never used), your motherboard may require a driver to be loaded at boot time to enable the M.2 interface which means you will have to boot from SATA hard drive/SSD even the OS can be on the M.2 SSD. I think, but not certain.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 10
    Windows 10 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       03 Jan 2017 #7

    OK,thanks,but my SSD have also OS.I made this with Paragon Migrate OS to SSD 5.0
    brummyfan said: View Post
    You could also try backing up your C drive to an external*HDD, create a recovery disk using Macrium Reflect and restore the image to new SSD.
    Create a Windows PE Rescue Environment
    v5: How to create a disk image (Backup, Image, v5)
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    03 Jan 2017 #8

    Egrupov said: View Post
    Thank you for fast answer but my SSD in BIOS invisible!Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	6 
Size:	10.4 KB 
ID:	115650Only in Windows Explorer
    Egrupov said: View Post
    My SSD is Crucial SSD SATA 275GB MX300!
    Egrupov,

    From the image you posted, it appears that you have a 1TB HDD partitioned as C: and D: partitions. Your SSD is a M.2 type that plugs into a card slot on your motherboard. (I also have the same Crucial 275GB MX300 SSD).

    I believe that your problem is that the SATA header that your 1TB HDD is connected to, will always have priority over the M.2 SSD connector. That is how it is on my Acer Spin3 laptop. As long as you have a bootable operating system on your 1TB HDD, it will always boot instead of your SSD. (Regardless of the boot priority setup in the BIOS or by tapping the F12 or appropriate key for the boot priority. - Edit)

    Disconnect the 1TB HDD and then try booting. Since the M.2 SSD will be the only OS, it will be booted. If this works, then you will have to delete the Win10 on the 1TB HDD to be able to have the 1TB HDD installed along with your SSD and be able to boot from the SSD.

    However it is troubling that you say that the SSD is invisible in your BIOS. If that is really true, then why can Windows see it? Anyway, try disconnecting the 1TB HDD and try booting.

    I assume that your SSD is a clone of the C: partition from your 1TB HDD. If so, then it should boot. If you installed Win10 from scratch on the SSD, then it would matter if it is legacy or UEFI bootable. I'm not sure if Win10 can even be legacy bootable but from my past experience with earlier Windows OS', those could be UEFI or legacy bootable. BIOS must be set correctly for legacy or UEFI boot to match the OS that you're booting.

    mck
    Last edited by mck; 08 Jan 2017 at 15:20.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    03 Jan 2017 #9

    @mck,

    It is not the presence of a "C Drive" or operating system partition on a drive that makes it bootable or not. In the standard installation of Winodws 7, 8 or 10 (and maybe even before Windows 7, I don't remember) there is a separate partition that usually does not have a drive letter assigned and is not visible in file explorer that the computer boots from. This is called the system partition. The system partition contains the files that then loads the operating from the "C Drive" partition which is called the boot partition. Yes, I think Microsoft named them backwards, but that's the way it is.

    For a legacy BIOS computer, the physical drive itself will be the MBR partition type, with either a FAT32 or NTFS separate System Reserved partition that contains the boot files which then loads the OS from the larger normally NTFS boot partition (C Drive). The system partition the computer boots from must be marked as active, and the NTFS partition the OS resides on won't be (you can only have 1 active partition per physical drive, and that is what BIOS looks for - the active partition).

    For a UEFI computer, the physical drive itself will be the GPT partition type and will have a separate FAT32 EFI System Partition which will then load the OS from the boot partition (C Drive). UEFI does not use the active partition marker - it looks for an EFI System Partition to boot from.

    So - it's not really whether or not there is an OS installed on a partition on the drive that matters. It's whether or not there is an active partition containing the boots files on a legacy BIOS computer, or whether or not there is an EFI System partition on a UEFI computer. The user does not necessarily need to delete the C: drive partition - they need to remove the active partition (BIOS) or EFI System partition (UEFI). This is also the partition that must be cloned to the SSD to make it bootable.

    Below, you can see that my volume 3 is the partition that the computer boots from, an EFI System partition, whereas volume 1 is the partition that contains the OS.

    Code:
    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.14393]
    (c) 2016 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
    
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>diskpart
    
    Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.14393.0
    
    Copyright (C) 1999-2013 Microsoft Corporation.
    On computer: JOHN-LAPTOP
    
    DISKPART> list volume
    
      Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
      ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
      Volume 0     G                       DVD-ROM         0 B  No Media
      Volume 1     C                NTFS   Partition    446 GB  Healthy    Boot
      Volume 2         Recovery     NTFS   Partition    450 MB  Healthy    Hidden
      Volume 3                      FAT32  Partition    100 MB  Healthy    System
      Volume 4     D   Data         NTFS   Partition    856 GB  Healthy
      Volume 5     E                NTFS   Partition     69 GB  Healthy
      Volume 6     R   RECOVERY     FAT32  Partition   5633 MB  Healthy
      Volume 7     F                       Removable       0 B  No Media
    
    DISKPART>
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  10. Posts : 10
    Windows 10 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       06 Jan 2017 #10

    Thanks all,i solved problem!Specially thanks mck!
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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