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  1. Joined : Sep 2016
    Posts : 1
    Windows 10
       27 Sep 2016 #1

    PSU Died...is it repairable?


    Hi, hope someone can help me here.

    So I have a Corsair CX430 PSU however, it has been modded to run outside of my computer in a completely different, non computer related setup. To cut a long story short, it got connected to a car battery (+12v rail to battery positive and ground to ground)...don't ask why, someone got the plugs the wrong way around!

    Anyway, because the battery has a voltage of about 13V, there was obviously current flowing back into the PSU (rather than into the battery), the PSU promptly shut itself down and wouldn't turn on again. The error was quickly spotted and the battery removed very quickly, no visible or audible damage occured but I haven't opened the PSU to see exactly yet.

    So, I was wondering what you think might have blown, is likely to have been a simple diode, or is it likely to have been extensive damage that is completely irrepairable?

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    All the best.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  2. Joined : Oct 2014
    Posts : 654
    Windows 7
       27 Sep 2016 #2

    Welcome to the forum.

    DO NOT ATTEMPT REPAIR.

    In theory it is likely possible but it is rarely even attempted. It just isn't economically viable. It is dangerous to do so for anyone who does not have the required knowledge and skills. Most computer technicians do not have this knowledge. These units were not designed to be repaired so replacement parts and service information is not readily available.

    That is not an expensive PSU.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  3. Joined : Jun 2015
    UK
    Posts : 1,316
    Windows 10 Home x64 (Laptop), Windows 10 Pro x64 (Desktop)
       27 Sep 2016 #3

    You won't see any output from the PSU until you connect two pins on the PSU cable. Try the paper clip test here http://support.antec.com/support/sol...paperclip-test

    Hopefully, your PSU protection circuits will have worked and the PSU will turn on. I would check all output voltages are within spec before connecting it to your PC.

    IF the PSU is dead, I would just buy a new one unless you are really confident in mending it.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  4. Joined : Aug 2014
    Forever West
    Posts : 2,555
    Win10 Home and Pro, Win10 Insider Preview, Win7 Home, Linux Mint
       27 Sep 2016 #4

    Agreed, too difficult to repair by most consumers. Most power supplies I've seen fail was because of burst capacitors. Have seen a few unexplained failures but couldn't determine if problems with the motherboard caused the failure or if the power supply caused the motherboard to fail.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  5. Joined : May 2015
    Posts : 1,373
    Win 10 14393.51
       27 Sep 2016 #5

    LMiller7 said: View Post
    DO NOT ATTEMPT REPAIR.
    I'm not sure why this post gave a warning without an explanation.

    For reasons I've never been clear on, it is common for PSUs to produce internal voltages of hundreds of volts. There's an electric shock hazard if you poke around inside of one, far beyond what you'd expect from the line voltages.

    A well-designed unit should have bleeder resistors so the capacitors in the PSU don't retain a charge for too long, but do you want to take a chance on that?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  6. Joined : Oct 2014
    Posts : 654
    Windows 7
       27 Sep 2016 #6

    I did explain why repair should not be attempted.
    1. It is not economical.
    2. It is difficult.
    3. It is potentially dangerous.

    I didn't have time for more lengthy explanations.

    I have worked on many power supplies and am quite familiar with their operation. Not in computers but the principles are the same. If reasonable precautions are taken the dangers in working with a PSU with no power applied are minimal. The problem is that there are often have no visible signs and measurements on a circuit without power applied don't get you very far. I many cases measurements must be made when power is applied. I have done this many times. This raises the potential dangers, both to the PSU and the individual, to a new level. Quite routine for an experienced technician but amateurs should stay far far away from this.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  7. Joined : Dec 2013
    Portsmouth Hampshire
    Posts : 1,190
    Windows 10 x86 14383 Insider Pro and Core 10240
       27 Sep 2016 #7

    Many PSUs have traditional fuses that blow in the event of overcurrent situations, but it may not be easy to get the correct replacements. Rarely do these units have published circuit diagrams or component size and value inventory lists, and once the unit has been extricated from the protective (and often razor edged) steel cage, cleaned from the filth they have collected while the fan has been sucking millions of air changes over the charged components, there is often a heavily oversoldered PCB without any hazard notifications or protection for the dismantler.

    I'd tend to believe the claim: "No user-serviceable parts inside"
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  8. Joined : Jun 2015
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Posts : 40
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       27 Sep 2016 #8

    While I certainly agree with the above cautions that very few should attempt a repair of this sort, be also aware that modern switching supplies need a certain MINIMUM current load to function.

    So a simple voltage test on outputs will probably not work.

    Maybe you can find an old motherboard that you don't mind sacrificing as a test.

    But all that said, I would just make things simple and buy a new power supply. Troubleshooting intermittent power supply problems would be difficult. It may work on low loads but go into overtemp too quickly - who knows?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  9. Joined : Jun 2015
    UK
    Posts : 1,316
    Windows 10 Home x64 (Laptop), Windows 10 Pro x64 (Desktop)
       27 Sep 2016 #9

    arachnaut said: View Post
    While I certainly agree with the above cautions that very few should attempt a repair of this sort, be also aware that modern switching supplies need a certain MINIMUM current load to function.

    So a simple voltage test on outputs will probably not work.

    Maybe you can find an old motherboard that you don't mind sacrificing as a test.

    But all that said, I would just make things simple and buy a new power supply. Troubleshooting intermittent power supply problems would be difficult. It may work on low loads but go into overtemp too quickly - who knows?
    The paper clip test I mentioned at Post 3 plus a drive as a load should tell if the PSU works, then test the output voltages if it powers on. I agree with the above posts not to attempt repair unless you are qualified.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  10. Joined : Jan 2014
    Oak Ridge TN, USA
    Posts : 23,934
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       27 Sep 2016 #10

    LMiller7 said: View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    DO NOT ATTEMPT REPAIR.

    In theory it is likely possible but it is rarely even attempted. It just isn't economically viable. It is dangerous to do so for anyone who does not have the required knowledge and skills. Most computer technicians do not have this knowledge. These units were not designed to be repaired so replacement parts and service information is not readily available.

    That is not an expensive PSU.
    I agree.. for the price of a new one it makes no sense to fix it at this point. If the OP checks Amazon he will find a new one would cost about 43 dollars, US. And for a few more dollars he can upgrade to a 500w PSU.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


 
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