Windows 10: Should SSD's be defragmented Solved

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  1.    08 Jun 2016 #1

    Should SSD's be defragmented


    Here's a question that hasn't been asked before I'm sure. Should an SSD be defragmented. Seriously, I know there are a multitude of opinions on this but was wondering what the experts on this forum would suggest.
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  2. Posts : 824
    Win10/64 Pro 1511 (and 2 Win 7/64 Ult & Pro systems)
       08 Jun 2016 #2

    Hi:

    Short answer: NO, not like the defrag of a spinner.

    Longer answer: one can TRIM a SSD. See here (scroll down to Option 5).

    Cheers,

    MM
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  3.    08 Jun 2016 #3

    Maggidon, everything I have ever read says not to defrag an SSD.
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  4.    08 Jun 2016 #4

    There is nothing to gain by defragging an SSD. Defragging was done to reduce the movement of the read/write head in a hard disk drive. There is no read/write head in an SSD to minimize the movement of. Any "smart" defragging program would not give you the option to defrag an SSD anyway.
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  5.    08 Jun 2016 #5

    The answer definitely no. As I understand it Windows 10 will run the Trim command and no user interaction is needed.
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  6.    08 Jun 2016 #6

    Maggidon said: View Post
    Here's a question that hasn't been asked before I'm sure. Should an SSD be defragmented. Seriously, I know there are a multitude of opinions on this but was wondering what the experts on this forum would suggest.
    The reason there are a multitude of opinions is because Microsoft have never officially released a statement regarding this.

    The closest we have is a blog post from Scott Hanselman from 2014, who talked directly to developers on the Windows Storage team and they confirmed Windows does sometimes defrag SSD's and that it's by design. However, I've never seen anything official on a microsoft.com site to back this up.

    Link:
    The real and complete story - Does Windows defragment your SSD? - Scott Hanselman

    I have run SSD's for a number of years and have witnessed Windows defrag an SSD with my own eyes after a new Windows install, but I have never experienced any ill effects and now just let Windows take care of HDD/SSD optimisation. You kinda need to trust that OS and storage controller engineers know what they're doing to land that type of job in the first place, especially as SSD's aren't new technology anymore, however something official would be nice to put speculation to rest once and for all.
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  7.    08 Jun 2016 #7

    Winuser, please clarify for me. You say the answer is definitely no. But then you say Windows 10 will run the Trim command. What is the Trim Command? Is that something that kicks in only when the SSD is installed?
    Moxiemomma, you say "sroll down to number Where is number 5?

    Also, I'm being told not to hibernate an SSD drive. Is this true or false?
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  •    08 Jun 2016 #8

    You should only defrag a SSD if you want to destroy it in a matter of months. Other than that.......NO!!! Defragging generates los of write hits, which will gradually slow an SSD down and kill it as they go higher. It's an SSD flash-based device, not a hard drive with spinning platters. The seek time is near instant, unlike an HDD, which needs to be defragged regularly because info gets scattered around on the platters, making access times longer.
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  •    08 Jun 2016 #9

    Maggidon said: View Post
    Winuser, please clarify for me. You say the answer is definitely no. But then you say Windows 10 will run the Trim command. What is the Trim Command? Is that something that kicks in only when the SSD is installed?
    Moxiemomma, you say "sroll down to number Where is number 5?

    Also, I'm being told not to hibernate an SSD drive. Is this true or false?
    This is the trim command,

    A Trim command (known as TRIM in the ATA command set, and UNMAP in the SCSI command set) allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trim_(computing)

    The number 5 MoxieMomma is referring to is in the word "here" in her post,

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Or here,

    Optimize and Defrag Drives in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums
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  •    08 Jun 2016 #10

    Ok, so if I'm getting the messages correctly, then I should turn off Trim. Also, is "hibernating" an SSD going to hurt it or not?
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